Adults|Spoken|Intermediate|7. Survivors

What is going on in the picture?

pic1_Spoken|Int|L7


Look at the picture. Discuss the questions.

  1. Have you ever had to cope with difficulties and survive? Where and when was it?
  2. Have you ever taken any surviving training courses? Were they useful? Why?

to mug — to threaten or assault (a person) with the intent to rob

to break down — If a machine or vehicle breaks down, it stops working


pic2_Spoken|Int|L7


Which three of these situations are the worst? Tick them and explain your choices.

Read and answer the questions

to sever — to cut through something, especially a part of the body

to tighten — to fit very close to your body

bleeding — the process of losing blood


pic3_Spoken|Int|L7


Boy uses belt to stop bleeding

Abbeville, S.С (AР) A boy whose leg was severed by a train used his belt to stop himself from bleeding to death — a skill he learned from his mother when she was studying to be a nurse.

Alex Compton, 10, was crossing the tracks near his home on Monday when his foot got caught on some rocks.

After the accident, he removed his belt and tightened it around his thigh to stop the bleeding, rescue workers said. He learned the technique from his mother, Lisa Compton, who had studied first aid at school. A neighbour found Alex beside the track. His leg was also found but doctors couldn’t reattach it.

Abbeville County Coroner Ronnie Ashley said he had never known anyone to survive such an accident. «Alex is a very, very brave child,» Ashley said. «He’s something special. He keeps wanting to know how he’s going to ride his bicycle and how he is going to run and play with the other kids.»

Lost woman survives in woods

Kelly Salt (AP) A 55-year-old woman who wandered into the Angeles National Forest a month ago and got lost has been found alive, police said.

Kelly Salt , who was reported missing on September 30th, was found by a hunter on Monday about 60 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, sheriff’s Deputy Michael Lorenci said.

Kelly was too weak to walk, so rescuers transported her by helicopter to Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, where she was treated.

Kelly told the hunter she had been lost for about two weeks and survived by eating roots and bugs. To survive, she covered herself with dirt and branches at night to keep warm.

«We’re all surprised that she’d been out there for 30 days and that she survived,» Lorenci said. «It’s not every day that something like this happens.»


  1. What has happened?
  2. Did the person survive?

Boy uses belt to stop bleeding

Abbeville, S.С (AР) A boy whose leg was severed by a train used his belt to stop himself from bleeding to death — a skill he learned from his mother when she was studying to be a nurse.

Alex Compton, 10, was crossing the tracks near his home on Monday when his foot got caught on some rocks.

After the accident, he removed his belt and tightened it around his thigh to stop the bleeding, rescue workers said. He learned the technique from his mother, Lisa Compton, who had studied first aid at school. A neighbour found Alex beside the track. His leg was also found but doctors couldn’t reattach it.

Abbeville County Coroner Ronnie Ashley said he had never known anyone to survive such an accident. «Alex is a very, very brave child,» Ashley said. «He’s something special. He keeps wanting to know how he’s going to ride his bicycle and how he is going to run and play with the other kids.»

Lost woman survives in woods

Kelly Salt (AP) A 55-year-old woman who wandered into the Angeles National Forest a month ago and got lost has been found alive, police said.

Kelly Salt , who was reported missing on September 30th, was found by a hunter on Monday about 60 miles north of downtown Los Angeles, sheriff’s Deputy Michael Lorenci said.

Kelly was too weak to walk, so rescuers transported her by helicopter to Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, where she was treated.

Kelly told the hunter she had been lost for about two weeks and survived by eating roots and bugs. To survive, she covered herself with dirt and branches at night to keep warm.

«We’re all surprised that she’d been out there for 30 days and that she survived,» Lorenci said. «It’s not every day that something like this happens.»


Read the text. Choose True, False or NEI (not enough information).

Look at the underlined sentence. Does this mean that it is very unusual or that it is commonplace? Choose what the expressions mean: «very unusual» or «more common»

«We’re all surprised that he’d been out there for 30 days and that he survived,» Lorenci said.

«It’s not every day that something like this happens.»

pic4_Spoken|Int|L7


Look at the picture. What’s going on? How can people survive? What do you usually say when you see the news of this kind on the Net? Let’s respond to some news with the expressions we’ve just learnt.

a pile-up — a traffic accident involving several vehicles that hit each other

to resign — to give up a job or position by telling your employer that you are leaving

flooding — an overflow of a large amount of water beyond its normal limits, especially over what is normally dry land


pic5_Spoken|Int|L7


Choose the correct response

pic6_Spoken|Int|L7


Discuss the best ways to survive in these situations

  1. You are on holiday in Australia. You are swimming about a mile off shore. You have just seen a shark about 100 metres away.
  2. The small plane you were travelling in has crashed in the middle of the jungle. You are unharmed, but you have no food or water.
  3. You are in a busy street in the city. Buildings start moving. It’s an earthquake!
  4. You are on holiday — on safari in Africa. You are camping. A very large snake has entered your tent.
  5. You wake up, smell smoke and realise that there is a fire in your house.
  6. You are trapped in a crowded lift — 2 hours have passed and still no help has arrived.

Look at the picture. Who’s the man?

  • In the previous step we discussed survival situations.
  • What are top 5 household items to use for survival in the wild from your point of view?
  • Let’s see what Michael will tell us. Cross out the names of household items you didn’t hear.

pic7_Spoken|Int|L7


Choose the names of the household items you didn’t hear

Cooper | Grylls

Cooper: You have a list of top 10 household items to save your life in the wild. I just want to read the top five and have you tell me how each one can save you. Number five is a shoe lace. What do you do with that?
Grylls: Well, there’s so much to do with a shoe lace — making traps, to climbing up trees, to stitching stuff, to securing yourself to something. So, you know, what I love about survival is the fact that it’s not just all about the text but knowledge. It’s about improvising, you know, when you’re up against it. And, you know, thousand different ways you can use stuff.
And I think the one edge over the animals is this ability to really improvise and really adapt. And, you know, that’s a part of survival I love. I love getting dropped on these places with very little and showing how you can use just a couple of simple things to achieve something that you’d never come to think possible, whether sitting up a tree (ph) using shoe laces, or, you know, making a raft out of kind of almost nothing. And, you know, that’s a part of it I love.
Cooper: Number four is a sock. What would you use a sock for?
Grylls: A sock? Again, loads of things. You know, you can filter water through it. I’ve filtered so much water myself and even my underpants over years, you know, and got stuffed it with grass and charcoal and sand and gravel and filtered water through it. But, again, you know, the heart of «Man Versus Wild» is that this might not look pretty but it could save your life.
Cooper: Number three is a wristwatch. What is that, for direction as a compass?
Grylls: You know, wristwatch, it’s just good. You know, number one thing is to you’re going to get your bearings if you’re going to get yourself out of there. You need to know which way you’re doing And, you know, most people don’t carry compass with them. There’s a simple way of using wristwatch and pointing the hour hand of sun (inaudible) 12:00 to give you a south line and, you know, you have worked out the directions.
So, it’s a simple thing. But, you know, again, it’s something all of us carry that might not necessarily know that there’s more ways of using your wristwatch.
Cooper: Well, wait a minute, I didn’t actually know that. If you point the 12:00 to the sun and what is it?
Grylls: Yes. So in the Northern Hemisphere, 12:00 at the sun, split the line between your hour hand and the 12:00 and that will give you a southerly direction.
Cooper: So, that’s the direction of south. Oh, that’s interesting. OK. Number two on the list was a paper clip.
Grylls: Anderson, you should know that. Even my kids know that one.
Cooper: What? It’s a compass or it’s magnetized? Is that right?
Grylls: A paper clip. Yes. Again, so many things — you can thread with it. You can use it as triggers for traps. Again, you could use it for a compass. You magnetize it on and put it a leaf and some water and it will show you a magnetic north direction.
So, again, it’s about taking every day items and thinking a bit left field and, you know, they always say necessity is the mother of invention and that is survival to kind of think all I’ve got is a paper clip. I got to work out a direction, you’d eventually come out with a way of finding it.
Cooper: And final thing was a battery. Is that for what, starting a fire or something?
Grylls: Yes. Again, you know, battery — so many things, again, that, you know, you might be, you know, you need a signal out. You can use a radio, a cell phone, and rig it up to work again. You can use it for fire and I’ve started loads of fires over the years with car batteries just to get a bit of tinder going. So, yes, useful thing.


pic8_Spoken|Int|L7

Let’s watch the video again and see how each of the items can be used to survive.

a wristwatch — a small watch that is attached to a bracelet or strap and is worn around the wrist

a trap — a device for taking game or other animals; especially: one that holds by springing shut suddenly

to stitch — make, mend, or join (something) with a thread

a raft — a collection of logs for support or transportation on water

a trigger — a lever on a gun that you pull to fire the gun


Watch again. Match the household items with the explanations how to use them

Cooper | Grylls

Cooper: You have a list of top 10 household items to save your life in the wild. I just want to read the top five and have you tell me how each one can save you. Number five is a shoe lace. What do you do with that?
Grylls: Well, there’s so much to do with a shoe lace — making traps, to climbing up trees, to stitching stuff, to securing yourself to something. So, you know, what I love about survival is the fact that it’s not just all about the text but knowledge. It’s about improvising, you know, when you’re up against it. And, you know, thousand different ways you can use stuff.
And I think the one edge over the animals is this ability to really improvise and really adapt. And, you know, that’s a part of survival I love. I love getting dropped on these places with very little and showing how you can use just a couple of simple things to achieve something that you’d never come to think possible, whether sitting up a tree (ph) using shoe laces, or, you know, making a raft out of kind of almost nothing. And, you know, that’s a part of it I love.
Cooper: Number four is a sock. What would you use a sock for?
Grylls: A sock? Again, loads of things. You know, you can filter water through it. I’ve filtered so much water myself and even my underpants over years, you know, and got stuffed it with grass and charcoal and sand and gravel and filtered water through it. But, again, you know, the heart of «Man Versus Wild» is that this might not look pretty but it could save your life.
Cooper: Number three is a wristwatch. What is that, for direction as a compass?
Grylls: You know, wristwatch, it’s just good. You know, number one thing is to you’re going to get your bearings if you’re going to get yourself out of there. You need to know which way you’re doing And, you know, most people don’t carry compass with them. There’s a simple way of using wristwatch and pointing the hour hand of sun (inaudible) 12:00 to give you a south line and, you know, you have worked out the directions.
So, it’s a simple thing. But, you know, again, it’s something all of us carry that might not necessarily know that there’s more ways of using your wristwatch.
Cooper: Well, wait a minute, I didn’t actually know that. If you point the 12:00 to the sun and what is it?
Grylls: Yes. So in the Northern Hemisphere, 12:00 at the sun, split the line between your hour hand and the 12:00 and that will give you a southerly direction.
Cooper: So, that’s the direction of south. Oh, that’s interesting. OK. Number two on the list was a paper clip.
Grylls: Anderson, you should know that. Even my kids know that one.
Cooper: What? It’s a compass or it’s magnetized? Is that right?
Grylls: A paper clip. Yes. Again, so many things — you can thread with it. You can use it as triggers for traps. Again, you could use it for a compass. You magnetize it on and put it a leaf and some water and it will show you a magnetic north direction.
So, again, it’s about taking every day items and thinking a bit left field and, you know, they always say necessity is the mother of invention and that is survival to kind of think all I’ve got is a paper clip. I got to work out a direction, you’d eventually come out with a way of finding it.
Cooper: And final thing was a battery. Is that for what, starting a fire or something?
Grylls: Yes. Again, you know, battery — so many things, again, that, you know, you might be, you know, you need a signal out. You can use a radio, a cell phone, and rig it up to work again. You can use it for fire and I’ve started loads of fires over the years with car batteries just to get a bit of tinder going. So, yes, useful thing.


Think of ideas for your comment. Read the task, plan and the words.

pic9_Spoken|Int|L7


You are a trainer at a Survival School. Plan a survival course.

  1. What is the course called and what are the aims?
  2. When does it take place and how much is it?
  3. How long is it?
  4. What knowledge and skills will the trainee have obtained after the course?

Wordlist

Wordlist|Spoken|Int|L7


Write a comment on the website

Instructions

  1. Read the topic and the questions carefully.
  2. Plan what you are going to write about.
  3. Write at least 3 paragraphs: introduction, main body and conclusion.
  4. Check your essay before sending it for revision.

Урок Homework Курс
  • Survivors
  • The worst survival situation
  • Two successful stories?
  • Unusual or common?
  • It's hard to believe
  • The best ways to survive
  • Bear Grylls
  • Household items
  • Writing