Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful

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Discuss the quote with your teacher

«It is not enough to succeed. Others must fail.»

— Gore Vidal, US writer

charisma [kəˈrɪz.mə] — a ​special ​power that some ​people have ​naturally that makes them ​able to ​influence other ​people and ​attract ​their attention and ​admiration

dedication — the ​willingness to give a lot of ​time and ​energy to something because it is ​important

nepotism — the ​act of using ​your ​power or ​influence to get good ​jobs or ​unfair ​advantages for ​members of ​your own ​family

ruthlessness [ˈruːθləsnəs] — not ​thinking or ​worrying about any ​pain ​caused to ​others; ​cruelty

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Answer the questions

1. What makes people successful?

  • charisma
  • dedication
  • discipline
  • drive
  • imagination
  • looks
  • luck
  • money
  • nepotism
  • ruthlessness

2. What words can you add to this list?

3. Talk about a person you know who is successful. Why are they successful?

Comment on the indicators of success below. Decide how important they are in your culture

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🔹exotic holidays

🔹designer clothes

🔹pedigree pets

🔹trophy partner

🔹cosmetic surgery

🔹expensive jewellery

🔹luxury home(s)

🔹domestic help

🔹chauffeur-driven car(s)

🔹mixing with famous people

🔹exclusive club membership

🔹having your name in the media


Complete these statements with the words from the box

Orientated is used in BrE only; oriented is used in both BrE and AmE. It doesn’t matter which the Student (or you) uses as long as he is consistent.

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Read this news report and find nine words with common prefixes

Rabbit, the successful mobile phone company, has renamed itself ChitChat Media as part of its effort to establish itself worldwide. Although some industry commentators see the name change as risky and an indication of their overconfidence, the company continues to outperform all its rivals in the competitive telecoms market. In a statement, co-founder and CEO Markus Danton said that it was an exciting time for the company and that its achievements had been underestimated in the past. He went on to say, «We are an ultramodern company taking the next logical step to achieve our aim of becoming the leading company in the sector worldwide.»

He denied reports of problems in the recently entered Asian markets, claiming journalists had been misinformed. His ex-business partner Darius Schnell, who left the company less than three months ago, was not available for comment. Many experts feel Mr Schnell’s contributions to the success of the company have been devalued in recent press reports since his hasty exit last November.


Match the prefixes to these meanings

pic1|Business|Upper-Int|L20


Click on the word in each group that does not follow the prefix in bold

Complete these sentences with the given words

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ex-boss, deregulated, outbid, underperformed, co-authors, relaunch, mismanaged, ultramodern, overestimated

Comment on the statements

1. Outselling your rivals is the best indicator of success.

2. Mismanagement is the biggest cause of business failure.

3. Rebranding is often a pointless exercise.

4. Underfunding and overstaffing are the quickest way to failure.

5. Undercutting the competition is a dangerous business strategy.

Listen and complete the gaps

pic4|Business|Pre-Int|L3


Interviewer Tom Hockaday

Interviewer: What are the essential qualities of a successful business?
Tom Hockaday: I think that the absolute essence of a business is, or a successful business, is one which manages to manufacture and sell something, whether that’s a product or a service, but manages to sell it for more than it cost to produce it. So, you are generating profit from delivering a product or service and you’re getting more money in than is going out and that is absolutely at the heart of a successful business. Now, in our context at Isis, we are creating businesses which are based on developing very early-stage technology. So, actually, it’s going to take quite a few years for the company to go from those initial phases to actually having a product or service to sell. So, at the early stage of a technology business, really what we’re doing is we’re investing in the technology to take it through various stages of development, so that we can demonstrate it has increasing value, so that we might be able to attract more rounds of venture capital investment or finance from other sources. But, one day, of course, we are aiming for a product or service which we can sell for more than it cost us to produce.


Listen to the second part and summarise it

Interviewer Tom Hockaday

Interviewer: Which business success stories inspire you?
Tom Hockaday: I think the ones that are based upon a great team of people, where you can see the passion and the vision and the clarity of thought that has led to the creation of a successful business. So, from within Oxford, um, the work of Isis Innovation, in the last 10 years, we’ve helped set up 65 new companies — what we call university spin-out companies — based upon Oxford University technologies, Oxford University researchers, where we’ve got investment and management. And it’s probably unfair to pick out one from that list or, um … Nevertheless, there is a company called Natural Motion, which was set up in 2002, so already has had many years of development, and from its start — and I had the good fortune to be involved working with the people who set that company up at the beginning — um, it’s had those qualities of passion, vision and clarity. And it’s gone on to be a very successful software animation company. So, its software tools are used in the film industry, in the computer game industry, to help make software characters look more realistic in those formats. And it’s been fantastic to see the individuals involved working together from their early vision for what this company might be and seeing that being delivered, um, with, you know, passion and enthusiasm throughout those years. Of course, there have been some challenges along the way, but it’s been the clarity with which the team have taken forward their vision, over the years, which has been so impressive.

Listen to the final part of the interview and answer these questions

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Interviewer Tom Hockaday

Interviewer: Which types of business do you expect to succeed in the next five years?
Tom Hockaday: That’s a very difficult question to answer, of course, because we’re predicting the future. But it does seem to me that one of the areas in which there’s so much attention and so much focus, at the moment, is in environmental technologies, low-carbon technologies, alternative-energy technologies. So, in that overall area, um, within Oxford, we are already seeing an increased focus of research attention on those areas and we’ve successfully created some companies based upon developing technologies all aimed towards reducing carbon emissions, reducing energy consumption, to address the global challenge that we face at the moment. So, for example, we have set up a smart-metering technology company, so that domestic households will have far more information about their energy consumption and, with that, with that information, they can begin to modify their behaviour. And we’re also working on projects for tidal energy and wind energy and lightweight electric motors for the next generation of cars, all aimed at addressing this extraordinary problem we face of the, er, carbon emissions.


1. Which types of business does Tom expect to succeed in the near future?

2. Which four examples does he give?

Watch the whole interview and retell according to the plan

Interviewer Tom Hockaday

Interviewer: What are the essential qualities of a successful business?
Tom Hockaday: I think that the absolute essence of a business is, or a successful business, is one which manages to manufacture and sell something, whether that’s a product or a service, but manages to sell it for more than it cost to produce it. So, you are generating profit from delivering a product or service and you’re getting more money in than is going out and that is absolutely at the heart of a successful business. Now, in our context at Isis, we are creating businesses which are based on developing very early-stage technology. So, actually, it’s going to take quite a few years for the company to go from those initial phases to actually having a product or service to sell. So, at the early stage of a technology business, really what we’re doing is we’re investing in the technology to take it through various stages of development, so that we can demonstrate it has increasing value, so that we might be able to attract more rounds of venture capital investment or finance from other sources. But, one day, of course, we are aiming for a product or service which we can sell for more than it cost us to produce.
Interviewer: Which business success stories inspire you?
Tom Hockaday: I think the ones that are based upon a great team of people, where you can see the passion and the vision and the clarity of thought that has led to the creation of a successful business. So, from within Oxford, um, the work of Isis Innovation, in the last 10 years, we’ve helped set up 65 new companies — what we call university spin-out companies — based upon Oxford University technologies, Oxford University researchers, where we’ve got investment and management. And it’s probably unfair to pick out one from that list or, um … Nevertheless, there is a company called Natural Motion, which was set up in 2002, so already has had many years of development, and from its start — and I had the good fortune to be involved working with the people who set that company up at the beginning — um, it’s had those qualities of passion, vision and clarity. And it’s gone on to be a very successful software animation company. So, its software tools are used in the film industry, in the computer game industry, to help make software characters look more realistic in those formats. And it’s been fantastic to see the individuals involved working together from their early vision for what this company might be and seeing that being delivered, um, with, you know, passion and enthusiasm throughout those years. Of course, there have been some challenges along the way, but it’s been the clarity with which the team have taken forward their vision, over the years, which has been so impressive.
Interviewer: Which types of business do you expect to succeed in the next five years?
Tom Hockaday: That’s a very difficult question to answer, of course, because we’re predicting the future. But it does seem to me that one of the areas in which there’s so much attention and so much focus, at the moment, is in environmental technologies, low-carbon technologies, alternative-energy technologies. So, in that overall area, um, within Oxford, we are already seeing an increased focus of research attention on those areas and we’ve successfully created some companies based upon developing technologies all aimed towards reducing carbon emissions, reducing energy consumption, to address the global challenge that we face at the moment. So, for example, we have set up a smart-metering technology company, so that domestic households will have far more information about their energy consumption and, with that, with that information, they can begin to modify their behaviour. And we’re also working on projects for tidal energy and wind energy and lightweight electric motors for the next generation of cars, all aimed at addressing this extraordinary problem we face of the, er, carbon emissions.


Plan

1. The absolute essence of a successful business.

2. Creating successful businesses.

3. Inspiring business stories.

4. Prospective types of business.

Match the words to make the collocations


Complete the sentences using the collocations from the task above

Writing

Add the correct prefix to the words in italics

over, co, de, ex, mis, out, down, re, ultra, under

Listen to part one of the interview and do the task below

pic6_Business|Adv|L11


[h 5 p id=»9589″]

Interviewer Tom Hockaday

Interviewer: What are the essential qualities of a successful business?
Tom Hockaday: I think that the absolute essence of a business is, or a successful business, is one which manages to manufacture and sell something, whether that’s a product or a service, but manages to sell it for more than it cost to produce it. So, you are generating profit from delivering a product or service and you’re getting more money in than is going out and that is absolutely at the heart of a successful business. Now, in our context at Isis, we are creating businesses which are based on developing very early-stage technology. So, actually, it’s going to take quite a few years for the company to go from those initial phases to actually having a product or service to sell. So, at the early stage of a technology business, really what we’re doing is we’re investing in the technology to take it through various stages of development, so that we can demonstrate it has increasing value, so that we might be able to attract more rounds of venture capital investment or finance from other sources. But, one day, of course, we are aiming for a product or service which we can sell for more than it cost us to produce.


Are these statements True or False?


Listen to the second part and match the questions and the answers

[h 5 p id=»9591″]

Interviewer Tom Hockaday

Interviewer: Which business success stories inspire you?
Tom Hockaday: I think the ones that are based upon a great team of people, where you can see the passion and the vision and the clarity of thought that has led to the creation of a successful business. So, from within Oxford, um, the work of Isis Innovation, in the last 10 years, we’ve helped set up 65 new companies — what we call university spin-out companies — based upon Oxford University technologies, Oxford University researchers, where we’ve got investment and management. And it’s probably unfair to pick out one from that list or, um … Nevertheless, there is a company called Natural Motion, which was set up in 2002, so already has had many years of development, and from its start — and I had the good fortune to be involved working with the people who set that company up at the beginning — um, it’s had those qualities of passion, vision and clarity. And it’s gone on to be a very successful software animation company. So, its software tools are used in the film industry, in the computer game industry, to help make software characters look more realistic in those formats. And it’s been fantastic to see the individuals involved working together from their early vision for what this company might be and seeing that being delivered, um, with, you know, passion and enthusiasm throughout those years. Of course, there have been some challenges along the way, but it’s been the clarity with which the team have taken forward their vision, over the years, which has been so impressive.


Listen and match the two parts of these expressions from part three

[h 5 p id=»9592″]

Interviewer Tom Hockaday

Interviewer: Which types of business do you expect to succeed in the next five years?
Tom Hockaday: That’s a very difficult question to answer, of course, because we’re predicting the future. But it does seem to me that one of the areas in which there’s so much attention and so much focus, at the moment, is in environmental technologies, low-carbon technologies, alternative-energy technologies. So, in that overall area, um, within Oxford, we are already seeing an increased focus of research attention on those areas and we’ve successfully created some companies based upon developing technologies all aimed towards reducing carbon emissions, reducing energy consumption, to address the global challenge that we face at the moment. So, for example, we have set up a smart-metering technology company, so that domestic households will have far more information about their energy consumption and, with that, with that information, they can begin to modify their behaviour. And we’re also working on projects for tidal energy and wind energy and lightweight electric motors for the next generation of cars, all aimed at addressing this extraordinary problem we face of the, er, carbon emissions.


Find the expression for each example

  • Warm-up
  • What makes people successful
  • Indicators of success
  • Common prefixes
  • The meaning of prefixes
  • Using prefixes
  • Qualities of a successful business
  • Business and technologies
  • Whole interview
  • Useful collocations
  • Prefixes practice
  • Interview about success
  • Useful collocations
  • Prefixes practice
  • Interview about success
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2