Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation

Discuss the questions with your teacher

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1. What is job satisfaction?

2. What is motivation? Are you a motivated person?


Quotation

«A man can stand anything except a succession of ordinary days.»

— Johan Wolfgang Goethe (1749-1832), German writer

Choose top five factors that might motivate you



Listen and tick off the factors which the speakers mention

I suppose I do have great people around me, which is good, and I do enjoy coming to work, but my main motivation is the financial incentive. Being in sales means that I can really increase my salary because of my efforts — the more I sell, the more I can earn. The only thing that worries me is that things are a bit unstable at the moment — I don’t think anyone is really safe. I just try to keep my head down and do a good job.


What really motivates me is the variety I have at work. There are a lot of challenges. No two jobs are the same. I’m learning all the time, you know — developing. The other thing is, the company offers plenty of chances to talented people. You can climb the ladder quickly if you’re good. That’s very motivating — you feel that if you do good work, it’ll be rewarded.


It’s a huge company, so I’m just a small part of a very big machine. I don’t really get to see the results of my work. The company could do more. Someone saying «well done» now and again would be nice. The main thing for me is flexibility, and I guess freedom I’d like to work from home some of the time and be able to organise what I do and when I do it, but the company is keen on people being in the office.


Read the text and do the task below


Find the Job that’s Right for You!

Nearly 50% of all workers have jobs they aren’t happy with. Don’t let this happen to you! If you want to find the right job, don’t rush to look through the ads in the newspaper. Instead, sit down and think about yourself. What kind of person are you? What makes you happy?

According to psychologist John Holland, there are six types of personalities. Nobody is just one type, but most people are mainly one type. For each type, there are certain jobs that might be right and others that are probably wrong.

The Realistic type is practical and likes working with machines and tools.

The Investigative type is curious and likes to learn, analyze situations, and solve problems.

The Artistic type is imaginative and likes to express himself/herself by creating art.

The Social type is friendly and likes helping or training other people.

The Enterprising type is outgoing and likes to persuade or lead other people.

The Conventional type is careful and likes to follow routines and keep track of details.

If you think about who you are, you can make the right job decision. Liz is a good example. Liz knew she wanted to do something for children. She thought she could help children as a school counselor or a lawyer. She took counseling and law courses — and hated them. After talking to a career counselor, she realized the problem was that she’s an Artistic type. Liz studied film, and now she produces children’s TV shows — and loves it.


In each group choose the job which does not suit the given personality type

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Do the quiz

Are you in danger of burning out?

You’re turning up for meetings at the right time, but in the wrong week. You’re pouring milk into the wastepaper basket rather than your coffee. You’ve lost your temper with half of the office, and the other half are cowering under their desks. You could be suffering from burnout, a debilitating condition caused by working too hard for too long and failing to prioritise. Try this quiz to see if you are in danger of self combusting.









Results_Burning out test

19-24 points

The Olympic flame is more likely to burn out than you. You glow gently when necessary, but rarely get above Gas Mark 3. This is because your stress levels are comfortably low and you know what to do at the first sign that things are getting on top of you.

11-18 points

You are smouldering slightly, and any spark could set you off. You may not think that you are a candidate for burnout, but you are heading in that direction. Try to develop your life outside work, and if it’s the job itself that’s causing the problem, think about looking for a new one.

8-10 points

It is simply a matter of time before there is a little pile of white ash on the chair where you used to sit. Take some positive action to prevent total burnout before it’s too late. Prioritise, delegate, improve your time management and, above all, ask for help immediately.

Choose the synonyms

pic1|GE|Adults|Int|Revise and Check 18-23


Complete the sentences with one word

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Answer the questions using the new words

1. What do you find satisfying and frustrating about your work or studies?

2. How true do you think these statements are?

a) There is no such thing as company loyalty these days.

b) Only successful people can have a good work-life balance.

c) Job satisfaction is about personality, not external factors.

d) Job satisfaction increases with age.

e) Improvements in technology lead to greater job satisfaction.

f) Job sharing and job rotation are not good for motivation.

g) People who work from home tend to work harder than people who work in offices.


1. assessment
2. breakdown
3. empowerment
4. fringe benefit
5. red tape
6. remuneration
7. severance payment
8. take industrial action

Listen to Madalyn Brooks, Director of Human Resources at Procter & Gamble (UK), and answer these questions

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Interviewer Madalyn Brooks

Interviewer: A recent survey rated Procter & Gamble as one of the best workplaces in the UK. How do you encourage job satisfaction among your staff?
Madalyn Brooks: I think attracting, retaining and motivating employees is key to any successful business. And that’s core of how you drive job satisfaction. At Procter & Gamble, I think we achieve this really in two main ways. The first way is that we seek to be a business that’s committed to its people. Most of our leaders of the organisation have grown up through the organisation. So they know it very well. They’ve come through individual, personalised career paths and development plans, committed to invest in them as they’ve developed their careers with us. We reward and recognise people individually as a company, for their individual contributions. Not as a group or as a total, but individually — driving their connection to what they work on to the reward and recognition that they get. Diversity and celebrating difference of people is another core principle by which we operate. Recognising that great innovation comes from diversity. We seek to make this part of what we call our DNA in our company. So, I think it’s commitment to people, but, beside that, we also focus on challenging our people. People need to be challenged to drive job satisfaction. We are in a very tough market place. We operate in the fast-moving consumer goods arena and this drives constant challenge and dynamic change. Our consumers are very demanding. They constantly want new products, new ideas that are going to improve their lives, which is company purpose. So, our people are constantly challenged to come up with new innovation, new ideas and build ever-stronger and better customer relationships and supplier relationships. So, I think through two-pronged approach of committed to people and driving challenging opportunities for them has driven our job satisfaction.


1. What is the key to a successful business?

2. What are the two main ways in which Procter & Gamble drives job satisfaction?


Listen to the second part of the interview and take notes

Interviewer Madalyn Brooks

Interviewer: Do you think that job priorities among employees have changed much over the last 10 years?
Madalyn Brooks: Yes, I do. I think job priorities have changed in the last 10 years, since I’ve been working in this field. I think there are several areas that I can think of that come to mind. The first one, I think, is flexibility. A stronger demand these days for flexibility in the way … when people work, where they work and how they work. This was initially driven, I think, by the changing role of women in the workplace. As more women entered our workplaces, the demand for flexible hours, flexible timing, started. But, as time’s moved on, it’s the new emerging generations in the workplace who are demanding even greater flexibility of where they work through new emerging technologies, of, of remote communications and also the demand for sabbaticals and opportunity to take time out, which is changing the workplace of today. I think another key area that has changed is the drive for personal learning and growth — a second area where, I think, people really want to take personal control of their growth. I think, before, individuals looked at the company to do that for them. People don’t expect to stay with the same company, or even doing the same type of work, all their lives any more. So, there’s a much stronger drive towards my growth, my development and what am I learning in everything I do. And I think the third area I’d pick up on for the change is people’s requirement that the organisations they work for are socially responsible. That’s clearly moved a huge amount in the last 10 years. People now want to work for companies that are committed not just to greener environmental issues — such as reducing carbon footprint and recycling and, and these areas — but also things like how we’re committed to supporting our local communities. Can they get involved in charitable work and other voluntary areas? And these are hugely different to how I remember it being just 10 years ago.


1. Flexibility

2. The drive for personal learning and growth

3. Working for socially responsible organisations

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Listen and give a brief summary of the talk

Interviewer Madalyn Brooks

Interviewer: Looking forward, what changes do you see in the way people feel about work?
Madalyn Brooks: I think it’s more of what I was talking about with the changes. I think we’re on a journey. I think we’ll see an increase in this desire for training. Self-actualisation, building self and skills will be a constant demand. People are encouraged to be lifelong learners, to grow and develop, and we really see this demand increasing in the workplace. People want opportunity to grow through training, through opportunities of challenging assignments, and I think that will get ever, ever bigger. I think P&G is well set up to deal with that. Leadership and ownership are core of our principles, so that will come through as we, as we move ahead into the future. I do think this drive for feeling a company is socially responsible will also get higher. We are seeing, today, a drive for people’s desire to have time out, to get involved in voluntary work, to think how they can put back into the society that they’ve taken out of up until now. And I think people will want to feel proud of their workplaces in that respect. They’ll want to feel that they can share with their families and their friends an environment they are working in to be responsible. They’ll want to be able to take time to do voluntary work, such as working in schools, working in local communities and, and giving back. So, more of the changes we have already seen getting deeper into our workplaces, will be the challenge for us, employers, in the future.


Read this article from the Financial Times by Brian Groom and do the exercise that follows

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Unhappiness at work rises to record level

Brian Groom, Business and Employment Editor

Job satisfaction has dropped to a record low — with a particularly sharp fall among young people — as the pressures of recession take their toll, according to a leading business group. A study of 2,000 workers by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development suggests that, even if official figures mark an end to the recession, employees are still paying a high price in job insecurity and stress.

Evidence of unhappiness among young workers is disclosed after the launch of the government’s guarantee of a job, training or work experience place for every unemployed person aged 18 to 24 for six months. «We do not want to have the lost generation of the 1980s,» said the prime minister.

The government says that up to 470,000 opportunities will be created over 15 months, with 100,000 youngsters eligible straight away. ВТ, the telecoms group, announced 3,000 work placements in partnership with smaller companies. The CIPD’s survey, conducted by YouGov, found job satisfaction levels had fallen from a net +48 last summer to +35. The job satisfaction score is the difference between those saying they are satisfied and those who say they are not. In addition, fewer than one in 10 said their standard of living had improved in the past six months.

Job satisfaction among people aged 18 to 24 fell from +44 to just +5. Happiness at work was higher among older age groups, with those aged 55-64 most satisfied. Claire McCartney, a CIPD adviser, said, «Even though the economy is no longer flat on its back, the «real economy» as experienced in the day-to-day lives of workers is crippled.»

She said unhappiness among young people may be partly explained by the fact they had grown up in an era of plenty and had not seen anything like this. «The lack of opportunities to learn new skills or make their first steps up the career ladder is also likely to be grinding them down. The stagnant labour market means people are not moving on and up as they would like, leaving many young people stranded in entry-level jobs.» Most workers surveyed said it would be difficult to find another job if made redundant, while a fifth thought it likely they would lose their job. Public sector workers were more likely to report that their organisation had made, or planned to make, redundancies than in the previous quarter.


Read the text again and find in the first paragraph the words which have the given meanings


Look through the text to be ready to match the numbers and what they stand for


Decide if these statements are True or False


Answer the question

Complete each space in the article with the best word

Listen to Madalyn Brooks, director of human resources, Procter & Gamble (UK) and match the parts of the phrases

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Interviewer Madalyn Brooks

Interviewer: A recent survey rated Procter & Gamble as one of the best workplaces in the UK. How do you encourage job satisfaction among your staff?
Madalyn Brooks: I think attracting, retaining and motivating employees is key to any successful business. And that’s core of how you drive job satisfaction. At Procter & Gamble, I think we achieve this really in two main ways. The first way is that we seek to be a business that’s committed to its people. Most of our leaders of the organisation have grown up through the organisation. So they know it very well. They’ve come through individual, personalised career paths and development plans, committed to invest in them as they’ve developed their careers with us. We reward and recognise people individually as a company, for their individual contributions. Not as a group or as a total, but individually — driving their connection to what they work on to the reward and recognition that they get. Diversity and celebrating difference of people is another core principle by which we operate. Recognising that great innovation comes from diversity. We seek to make this part of what we call our DNA in our company. So, I think it’s commitment to people, but, beside that, we also focus on challenging our people. People need to be challenged to drive job satisfaction. We are in a very tough market place. We operate in the fast-moving consumer goods arena and this drives constant challenge and dynamic change. Our consumers are very demanding. They constantly want new products, new ideas that are going to improve their lives, which is company purpose. So, our people are constantly challenged to come up with new innovation, new ideas and build ever-stronger and better customer relationships and supplier relationships. So, I think through two-pronged approach of committed to people and driving challenging opportunities for them has driven our job satisfaction.


Listen again and find the words which mean the following

Interviewer Madalyn Brooks

Interviewer: A recent survey rated Procter & Gamble as one of the best workplaces in the UK. How do you encourage job satisfaction among your staff?
Madalyn Brooks: I think attracting, retaining and motivating employees is key to any successful business. And that’s core of how you drive job satisfaction. At Procter & Gamble, I think we achieve this really in two main ways. The first way is that we seek to be a business that’s committed to its people. Most of our leaders of the organisation have grown up through the organisation. So they know it very well. They’ve come through individual, personalised career paths and development plans, committed to invest in them as they’ve developed their careers with us. We reward and recognise people individually as a company, for their individual contributions. Not as a group or as a total, but individually — driving their connection to what they work on to the reward and recognition that they get. Diversity and celebrating difference of people is another core principle by which we operate. Recognising that great innovation comes from diversity. We seek to make this part of what we call our DNA in our company. So, I think it’s commitment to people, but, beside that, we also focus on challenging our people. People need to be challenged to drive job satisfaction. We are in a very tough market place. We operate in the fast-moving consumer goods arena and this drives constant challenge and dynamic change. Our consumers are very demanding. They constantly want new products, new ideas that are going to improve their lives, which is company purpose. So, our people are constantly challenged to come up with new innovation, new ideas and build ever-stronger and better customer relationships and supplier relationships. So, I think through two-pronged approach of committed to people and driving challenging opportunities for them has driven our job satisfaction.


Listen to part two and put the adverbs in the order you hear them

Interviewer Madalyn Brooks

Interviewer: Do you think that job priorities among employees have changed much over the last 10 years?
Madalyn Brooks: Yes, I do. I think job priorities have changed in the last 10 years, since I’ve been working in this field. I think there are several areas that I can think of that come to mind. The first one, I think, is flexibility. A stronger demand these days for flexibility in the way … when people work, where they work and how they work. This was initially driven, I think, by the changing role of women in the workplace. As more women entered our workplaces, the demand for flexible hours, flexible timing, started. But, as time’s moved on, it’s the new emerging generations in the workplace who are demanding even greater flexibility of where they work through new emerging technologies, of, of remote communications and also the demand for sabbaticals and opportunity to take time out, which is changing the workplace of today. I think another key area that has changed is the drive for personal learning and growth — a second area where, I think, people really want to take personal control of their growth. I think, before, individuals looked at the company to do that for them. People don’t expect to stay with the same company, or even doing the same type of work, all their lives any more. So, there’s a much stronger drive towards my growth, my development and what am I learning in everything I do. And I think the third area I’d pick up on for the change is people’s requirement that the organisations they work for are socially responsible. That’s clearly moved a huge amount in the last 10 years. People now want to work for companies that are committed not just to greener environmental issues — such as reducing carbon footprint and recycling and, and these areas — but also things like how we’re committed to supporting our local communities. Can they get involved in charitable work and other voluntary areas? And these are hugely different to how I remember it being just 10 years ago.


Listen to part three. Choose the correct alternative to replace for the expression in italics.

Interviewer Madalyn Brooks

Interviewer: Looking forward, what changes do you see in the way people feel about work?
Madalyn Brooks: I think it’s more of what I was talking about with the changes. I think we’re on a journey. I think we’ll see an increase in this desire for training. Self-actualisation, building self and skills will be a constant demand. People are encouraged to be lifelong learners, to grow and develop, and we really see this demand increasing in the workplace. People want opportunity to grow through training, through opportunities of challenging assignments, and I think that will get ever, ever bigger. I think P&G is well set up to deal with that. Leadership and ownership are core of our principles, so that will come through as we, as we move ahead into the future. I do think this drive for feeling a company is socially responsible will also get higher. We are seeing, today, a drive for people’s desire to have time out, to get involved in voluntary work, to think how they can put back into the society that they’ve taken out of up until now. And I think people will want to feel proud of their workplaces in that respect. They’ll want to feel that they can share with their families and their friends an environment they are working in to be responsible. They’ll want to be able to take time to do voluntary work, such as working in schools, working in local communities and, and giving back. So, more of the changes we have already seen getting deeper into our workplaces, will be the challenge for us, employers, in the future.


Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Motivating factors
  • 6 types of personalities
  • Burning out test
  • Synonyms and word-building
  • Job satisfaction
  • Employee satisfaction - 1
  • Employee satisfaction - 2
  • Job satisfaction survey
  • Herzberg's Theory
  • Procter & Gamble interview
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing