Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally

Warm-up



Choose a statement and discuss it using the words below


«Marketing is too important to be left to the marketing department.»

— David Packard


«The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well the product or service fits him and sells itself.»

— Peter Drucker


«Marketing is what you do when your product is no good.»

— Edwin Land


Wordlist

1. marketing mix 8. customer profile 15. survey 22. aspire
2. market adaptation 9. customer retention 16. market niche 23. relentless
3. market penetration 10. customer base 17. withdraw a product 24. competitive advantage
4. market segmentation 11. brand positioning 18. wholesaler 25. mature market
5. product placement 12. brand identity 19. seduce 26. global ambition
6. product portfolio 13. brand extension 20. discerning
7. product feature 14. expanding market 21. realm

Listening


Listen to Svend Hollensen, Professor of International Marketing at the University of South Denmark, and answer these questions

pic2_BusinessAdvL5
Svend Hollensen

pic3_BusinessAdvL5
Darrell Kofkin


Interviewer: How can products be designed to be suitable for international markets?
Svend Hollensen: Well, basically, there are two different strategies. There is one strategy where you have one product and you sell it all over in the same format, and there is another strategy where you try to adapt your product to the different cultures, to different countries that you are in. And I would like to show one example of a company who has really marketed one product concept for the whole world. And that is the OneCafe company. And this product is actually selling all over in the same format and, er, it is a small company, it is based in Denmark and in Sweden. So, it is a company which is kind of «born global». This means that it is getting into the global markets very fast and it is doing this by setting up production in Uganda in Africa and then from there, it tries to sell in other countries of the world. So, by setting up, for instance, a website from where they also sell these coffee products, they can sell to all kinds of hotel chains and to airline companies and to different retail chains. So, this would be an example of a global product concept.
And of course then there is the other situation where you have to adapt to the different cultures that you are in. So, you have to adapt to the cultural traditions, er, in China if you are going to China, or to India, and that means that you have to adapt your product and your concept, your communication, to the culture you are in and to the different environmental, er — environment that you face. That means that you have to adapt all levels of the marketing mix to the different regions and the different countries that you are in. And, er, that can be done in different ways, but, basically, again, two different strategies — one strategy where you have one product for all global markets and another strategy where you go into different markets with different product concepts. I like to mention another global company that will do one product concept and, for instance, the soap brand, Lux, is one example of a global brand that will sell all over. But, actually, most brands in the world are local brands. Um, most people don’t realise that, but that is actually the case. So most brands that you buy in retail stores in global markets are manufactured for local markets.

1. Which two marketing strategies does he mention?

2. What does he say about …

a) the OneCafe company,

b) Lux?


Darrell Kofkin is Chief Executive of the Global Marketing Network, a training organisation which offers qualifications in international marketing. Listen to the interview and complete the gaps in these two extracts


Interviewer: How can people be trained to be international marketeers?
Darrell Kofkin: Of course, people can learn on the job. One minute they may be asked by the Head of Marketing, ‘Go away and develop a global marketing strategy. We want to enter X country.’ And, therefore, they may learn by doing. We wouldn’t necessarily say that is the best way and certainly, since 2007, what we have done is to work very closely with Ashcroft International Business School at Anglia Ruskin University, and with our global faculty and with our global advisers in shaping a new curriculum that enables marketers worldwide to have the latest practices, the latest knowledge and techniques, to enable them to become international marketers. And the way we have also looked at doing it is to ensure that we enable really global relevance, but real world learning. So there are no exams for this programme. It’s purely based upon work-based assignments. So our students are asked to write a report, develop a business plan, develop a presentation, write a webcast, present an internal briefing paper — just as they would do in the workplace. Because we know in talking to employers worldwide that they want marketing professionals that have the capabilities and skills required of today’s demanding global business environment.

Grammar


Read the rules

A compound noun is two nouns together. Noun compounds are common in business because they are shorter and more convenient than noun phrases.

For example:

  • a market survey rather than a survey into the market
  • a product design brief rather than a brief for the design of a product

Longer noun phrases are also common. They may consist of adverbs, adjectives and compound noun. This pattern is typical:


adverb

adjective / — ing participle

noun

head noun

highly confidential sales report
excellent sponsorship deal
rapidly expanding customer base

1. When two nouns occur together, the first noun is used as an adjective and describes the second noun. The first noun answers the question «what kind of?».

a) a manufacturing subsidiary

b) a draft agenda

c) a phone conversation

d) a network operator

2. Noun + noun compounds can often be transformed into structures where the second noun becomes the subject.

a) an oil refinery (= a refinery that produces oil)

b) company executives (= executives that work for the company)

c) a travel agency (= an agency that sells travel)

3. Noun + noun compounds may also be reformulated using a preposition.

a) market research (= research into markets)

b) rail transport (= transport by rail)

c) leisure activities (= activities for leisure)

d) a web page (= a page on the Web)

e) their Paris store (= their store in Paris)

f) income distribution (= distribution of income)

4. The first noun is usually singular.

a) a five-star hotel (not five-stars)

b) consumer-purchasing behaviour (not consumers)

c) risk assessment (not risks)

d) brand names (not brands)

5. However, some words retain the plural form.

a) sales policy

b) needs analysis

6. Sometimes three or more nouns occur together.

a) line management system

b) production research centre

c) travel insurance claim form

d) Motorola’s software development establishments

7. Hyphens can be used to avoid ambiguity in such compounds.

a) software-development establishments

8. Noun compounds can be modified by adjectives and adverbs.

a) inspiring team leadership

b) international business development directors

c) extremely boring conference presentation

d) increasingly volatile mobile phone market

Reading


Find noun phrases in the article which have similar meanings

pic4_Business|Adv|L5



Diego Della Valle: Italian atmosphere is central to Tod’s global expansion

by Vincent Boland

1. It is not too difficult, in the high-ceilinged elegance of Palazzo Della Valle on the Corso Venezia in Milan, to be seduced by the charms of a certain kind of Italian lifestyle. Here is the headquarters of Tod’s Group, which has become a powerhouse in the marketing of that vision to the world’s wealthy and discerning.

2. The atmosphere is deliberate: where some Italian fashion houses have expanded even further into the realms of celebrity and glamour, Tod’s is anchored as firmly as it can be to its family roots and its traditional, hand-made, century-old heritage.

3. Its signature products — shoes and bags — are made of leather, a raw material that has remained almost unchanged since it was first discovered. A new advertising campaign will take the company back to basics, with a focus on Italian families and their lifestyles — actual Italian families, however rich and privileged — rather than on celebrities.

4. «The Italian lifestyle is in our DNA, and in our group, we believe in our DNA,» says Diego Della Valle, the Chairman and Chief Executive of Tod’s Group.

5. This image is especially important in new markets, such as China and India, he says. In common with other luxury-goods makers, he is intent on capturing consumers in those markets who aspire to the same sense of the Italian lifestyle as do customer in more mature markets. «A luxury-goods company has to have control of its image,» he says. «For Tod‘s, the thing is to communicate this tradition, the generations of work that have gone into our products. For us, it’s an absolute priority.»

6. To achieve it, one must put quality before quantity, and one must maintain the group’s traditions even as it globalises, which it has been doing fairly relentlessly in the past decade.

7. The challenge is to marry tradition with modernity in a way that not all Italian luxury-goods and fashion producers have managed. Tod‘s has done it. Mr Della Valle says, by maintaining one key vision: «We’re a luxury-goods company, not a fashion company.»

8. This distinction between fashion and luxury is central to Mr Della Valle’s global ambitions. «The two have different products and ought to have different strategies,» he says. «The competitors he admires most,» he says, «are Louis Vuitton, Hermes and Chanel.»

9. Mr Della Valle says that the goal in the next five years is «to complete the globalisation» of Tod‘s, for which he has been laying the groundwork. «I’d like Tod’s to be much bigger than it is now, without diluting the brand,» he says.

10. He expects China and India to account for as much as 25 per cent of revenues by then, because the growth potential is much higher than in more traditional markets. «There is a much bigger appetite for luxury goods in those markets than in mature markets, and day by day more people are coming into this market.»

11. But as for China as a competing producer, Mr Della Valle is sceptical about its ability to produce luxury goods. «It lacks the structure of small companies, the tradition, the concept of excellence that Italian luxury-goods producers have inherited and which they must maintain as a competitive advantage,» he says. «‘Made in ltaly’ doesn’t necessarily mean expensive goods,» he says. «It means excellent goods.»


Mark the word in each group which does not make a compound noun with the word in bold

Correct order


pic5_Business|Adv|L5


Put the words in each of these noun phrases in the correct order


Listen and check your answers

Brainstorming


Brainstorming is a useful way of generating creative ideas in meetings. Decide which of these tips are good advice and which ones you disagree with


1. Explain the purpose of the meeting clearly.

2. Ask each person to speak in turn, starting with the most senior.

3. Announce the time limit for the meeting.

4. Avoid criticising or judging ideas during the session.

5. Encourage ideas, however unusual they may be.

6. Don’t interrupt when people are offering suggestions.

7. Make sure everyone keeps to the point.

8. Don’t spend time on details.


Listen to the first part of a brainstorming meeting. Then answer the questions

This is a brainstorming meeting between Martin Thomas, the Marketing Director, who chairs the meeting, and three other members of the Marketing Department at Business Solutions Limited: Carol Rueckert, Caroline Holloway and Guillem Rojas.



Martin Thomas: Hi, good morning everyone, so the purpose of the meeting this morning is to have a look at the international sales conference we’re having next, um, year in January, and our objective here is to come up with location, activities that we can do in the, um, in the conference and look also at the accommodation and also some leisure-time activities so … What I’d like is for us to, um, brainstorm some ideas. OK, guys?
Caroline Holloway: Yeah, it sounds great.
Martin Thomas: OK. So maybe Caroline, do you want to … have you got any ideas for where we can have this?
Caroline Holloway: Yeah, um, I was thinking, maybe we should go to Amsterdam and we’ve had a few, um, conferences there in the past and they’ve been really successful, the facilities were great, so I think that would be a really good idea.
Martin Thomas: OK, anyone else?
Guillem Rojas: Actually, yeah, I also tend to like the summer conferences, like in Amsterdam, it was great, I … I’m just a bit worried about, you know, like the time of the year because it’s January, so it might just as well be just like a location more like in southern Europe, maybe like south of Portugal. Which would be, you know, it could be interesting like for everybody, you know.
Martin Thomas: That’s great. Any other ideas, any options?
Carol Rueckert: Well, l, my … my suggestion would be Florence. I think it’s a great city, um, lots of things to do there, there’s great food obviously, um, and they have very nice accommodation as well.
Martin Thomas: Mm-hm, OK, that’s great. Now, can we think of some, um, activities that, er, we can do in this sales conference?
Caroline Holloway: Mm, um, product launches, um, we always have something coming out, um, ah, at the beginning of the year, so, um, that’d be a great, um, session to have.
Carol Rueckert: Mm, and probably following that would be some product training?
Caroline Holloway: Good idea, yeah, mm-hm.

1. What do they want to achieve at the meeting?

2. What three locations are suggested?


1. To come up with suggestions for the location, accommodation and leisure-time activities for their international sales conference.

2. Amsterdam, south of Portugal, Florence.

The rest of the meeting


Now listen to the rest of the meeting and answer these questions

pic7_Business|Adv|L5



Martin Thomas| Carol Rueckert| Caroline Holloway | Guillem Rojas

Martin Thomas: That sounds … that’s an excellent suggestion, yeah, that’s great. OK, what about the accommodation, anybody any ideas on that?
Carol Rueckert: Well, I suppose we could do some different things, um, I mean, we could just go for a four-star hotel or, um, look at maybe some boutique hotels.
Caroline Holloway: Mm, that’s a good idea, but, um, yeah, l think it’ll end up coming down to price, but, um, accommo- um, there’s great accommodation in all the locations we’ve mentioned, so …
Guillem Rojas: Definitely, let’s see if we can get a good deal, you know, like research a bit on each, on each case, you know?
Caroline Holloway: Yeah.
Guillem Rojas: And it depends on the deal, I guess that will decide.
Caroline Holloway: Yeah.
Guillem Rojas: The budget is always important.
Martin Thomas: Yeah, any other ideas about what we … what we can do with the participants in their free time, what they — you know, all the delegates — can do?
Carol Rueckert: Well, I think it’ll depend on how long we’re actually going to have the conference …
Martin Thomas: Mm-hm.
Carol Rueckert: … um, but it would be nice to maybe take a half a day or something and go and see some of the sights.
Martin Thomas: That’s a good idea, yeah.
Caroline Holloway: Mm, excursions, yeah, you’re right, um, what’s always been successful, I think, is, um, gala dinner, the … um, it’s quite nice in the … in the evening to get to know, um, other delegates from all over the world, so dinner is a great way to interact with other colleagues.
Martin Thomas: That’s true.
Carol Rueckert: It’s a good idea.
Guillem Rojas: And finally, you know, all, maybe like, just like, um, some time you know, like doing, like I don’t know how many cases we’re going to like to have the conference, but like for networking, you know, because during the gala dinner you are not usually like discussing about too many issues about work. So just that you know there are no like, um, an hour, a day, you know, where the people can meet to discuss about anything.
Martin Thomas: OK, good, that’s really great, yeah.
Caroline Holloway: Mm-hm, that sounds good.
Martin Thomas: Thanks, guys, that’s … there’s some really brilliant ideas, so OK, we need to look at the location, then — we’ve got some ideas of Amsterdam, southern Portugal or Florence; we need to look at the … the timing more, but we know that we should take a half day out for some kind of leisure time activity to do with, um, the delegates for this. And the accommodation, we’ll look at depending on price, and also who can accommodate these, um, these people, and also we need to look at the, um, the workshops that you’ve suggested and the different sessions. OK, that’s great, thank you very much for some brilliant ideas.
Caroline Holloway: No problem, thanks.


1. What types of accommodation does Carol suggest?

2. What suggestions are made concerning the free time of delegates?

1. Four-star hotels or boutique hotels.

2. A half day to see the sights; a gala dinner; an hour a day for networking and for people to meet and discuss anything.


Match the comments made by the participants to the headings in the Useful language box below. Some comments can be put under more than one heading.


Useful language

Stating objectives

🔷The purpose of the meeting this morning is to …
🔷What we need to achieve today is …
🔷Our objective here is to …

Expressing enthusiasm

🔷That’s great!
🔷That’s the best idea I’ve heard for a long time.
🔷That’s an excellent suggestion.

Encouraging contributions

🔷Don’t hold back.
🔷Say whatever comes to mind.
🔷Any other ideas?
🔷At this stage, we want all your ideas, however crazy you think they are.

Agreeing

🔷Yes, that’s a good idea, because …
🔷Absolutely, because …
🔷Exactly, because …
🔷You’re (absolutely) right because …

Brainstorming practice


pic8_Business|Adv|L5


Choose a situation and hold a brainstorming meeting

Your company has developed a new sports or music magazine.
Brainstorm ideas for an advertising campaign.

Your company will shortly be receiving a visit from some important Chinese businesspeople who wish to set up a joint venture with your firm. Brainstorm ideas for a suitable programme for the three Chinese visitors.


Useful language

Stating objectives

🔷The purpose of the meeting this morning is to …
🔷What we need to achieve today is …
🔷Our objective here is to …

Expressing enthusiasm

🔷That’s great!
🔷That’s the best idea I’ve heard for a long time.
🔷That’s an excellent suggestion.

Encouraging contributions

🔷Don’t hold back.
🔷Say whatever comes to mind.
🔷Any other ideas?
🔷At this stage, we want all your ideas, however crazy you think they are.

Agreeing

🔷Yes, that’s a good idea, because …
🔷Absolutely, because …
🔷Exactly, because …
🔷You’re (absolutely) right because …

Listen to part one of the interview and match the verbs with the expressions that follow them

pic9_Business|Adv|L5


Svend Hollensen, professor of international marketing at the university of south Denmark.



Read the tapescript and check

Interviewer | Svend Hollensen

I: How can products be designed to be suitable for international markets?

S: Well, basically, there are two different strategies. There is one strategy where you have one product and you sell it all over in the same format, and there is another strategy where you try to adapt your product to the different cultures, to different countries that you are in. And I would like to show one example of a company who has really marketed one product concept for the whole world. And that is the OneCafe company. And this product is actually selling all over in the same format and, er, it is a small company, it is based in Denmark and in Sweden. So, it is a company which is kind of «born global». This means that it is getting into the global markets very fast and it is doing this by setting up production in Uganda in Africa and then from there, it tries to sell in other countries of the world. So, by setting up, for instance, a website from where they also sell these coffee products, they can sell to all kinds of hotel chains and to airline companies and to different retail chains. So, this would be an example of a global product concept.
And of course, then there is the other situation where you have to adapt to the different cultures that you are in. So, you have to adapt to the cultural traditions, er, in China if you are going to China, or to India, and that means that you have to adapt your product and your concept, your communication, to the culture you are in and to the different environmental, er — environment that you face. That means that you have to adapt all levels of the marketing mix to the different regions and the different countries that you are in. And, er, that can be done in different ways, but, basically, again, two different strategies — one strategy where you have one product for all global markets and another strategy where you go into different markets with different product concepts.
I like to mention another global company that will do one product concept and, for instance, the soap brand, Lux, is one example of a global brand that will sell all over. But, actually, most brands in the world are local brands. Um, most people don’t realise that, but that is actually the case. So most brands that you buy in retail stores in global markets are manufactured for local markets.

Complete the table with the words as Darrell use them

Darrell Kofkin, chief executive of the Global Marketing Network, a training organisation.

pic3_BusinessAdvL5




Read the tapescript and check

Interviewer | Darrell Kofkin

I: How can people be trained to be international marketeers?

D: Of course, people can learn on the job. One minute they may be asked by the Head of Marketing, ‘Go away and develop a global marketing strategy. We want to enter X country.’ And, therefore, they may learn by doing. We wouldn’t necessarily say that is the best way and certainly, since 2007, what we have done is to work very closely with Ashcroft International Business School at Anglia Ruskin University, and with our global faculty and with our global advisers in shaping a new curriculum that enables marketers worldwide to have the latest practices, the latest knowledge and techniques, to enable them to become international marketers.
And the way we have also looked at doing it is to ensure that we enable really global relevance, but real world learning. So there are no exams for this programme. It’s purely based upon work-based assignments. So our students are asked to write a report, develop a business plan, develop a presentation, write a webcast, present an internal briefing paper — just as they would do in the workplace. Because we know in talking to employers worldwide that they want marketing professionals that have the capabilities and skills required of today’s demanding global business environment.

Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Listening
  • Grammar
  • Reading
  • Correct order
  • Brainstorming
  • The rest of the meeting
  • Brainstorming practice
  • Svend Hollensen
  • Darrell Kofkin
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing