Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global

Warm-up



Revise the phrases to communicate at a brainstorming session

Useful language

1. Stating objectives

a) The purpose of the meeting this morning is to …

b) What we need to achieve today is …

c) Our objective here is to …

2. Expressing enthusiasm

a) That’s great!

b) That’s the best idea I’ve heard for a long time.

c) That’s an excellent suggestion.

3. Encouraging contributions

a) Don’t hold back.

b) Say whatever comes to mind.

c) Any other ideas?

d) At this stage, we want all your ideas, however crazy you think they are.

4. Agreeing

a) Yes, that’s a good idea because …

b) Absolutely, because …

c) Exactly, because …

d) You’re (absolutely) right because …

Brainstorming practice


Correct the mistakes in these expressions. One word in every expression is wrong

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Useful language

1. Stating objectives

a) The purpose of the meeting this morning is to …

b) What we need to achieve today is …

c) Our objective here is to …

2. Expressing enthusiasm

a) That’s great!

b) That’s the best idea I’ve heard for a long time.

c) That’s an excellent suggestion.

3. Encouraging contributions

a) Don’t hold back.

b) Say whatever comes to mind.

c) Any other ideas?

d) At this stage, we want all your ideas, however crazy you think they are.

4. Agreeing

a) Yes, that’s a good idea because …

b) Absolutely, because …

c) Exactly, because …

d) You’re (absolutely) right because …


Hold brainstorming meetings about these situations

1. The lease on your company’s headquarters in the city centre is ending and the firm must vacate the building. 80 managers and employees work there. Brainstorm …

a) the possible new locations for it;

b) solutions which would not require an HQ building at all.

2. Your company has developed a new electric car that can go much further without recharging the batteries than existing models. Brainstorm an advertising campaign for the car.

3. A national sports team from your country (choose the sport) has, yet again, just done very badly at the world championships. Brainstorm ideas for changes to the way the sport is managed and organised.

4. The percentage of rubbish and unwanted goods sent for recycling in your country (paper, plastic, electrical goods) is much lower than in neighbouring countries. Brainstorm ways to increase this percentage.

5. The chief executive of your company is leaving after 10 years of excellent performance and results. You and your fellow directors at the company brainstorm unusual ideas to mark his/her retirement.

Creating a global brand


Read the text and complete the tables

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Henri-Claude Cosmetics: Creating a global brand

A successful French cosmetics company plans to go global

Background

Henri-Claude Cosmetics (HCC), a French cosmetics and personal-care company, has created a highly successful eau-de-cologne for men under the brand name Physique. This is the company’s best-selling men’s fragrance and the best-known brand in their product portfolio. HCC is now planning an international campaign for Physique early next year. It intends a high-profile launch in 10 countries, which will enable the brand to achieve international recognition. The theme of the campaign will be «Physique for the Urban Man».

A global ambassador — a celebrity in the arts world — will be chosen to lead the campaign.

Key features of Physique

Based on redwood and cedar, with citrus and spices, Physique has a fresh, woody, long-lasting aroma.

  • It has five other secret ingredients, known to only a small number of senior managers.
  • The scent is very appealing to women. Men who use Physique say they feel confident, attractive and sophisticated.
  • Its target audience in France is ambitious, career-minded men in the 30–40 age range.

The eau-de-cologne is positioned as a premium fragrance. It is priced at the top end of the market.



Listen to the conversation and make notes on the aspects of the product

Carla Fernández, Global Marketing Manager, and Pierre Martin, Chief Executive of HCC, are talking about the results of research carried out in overseas markets concerning the international launch of Physique.



Carla Fernández | Pierre Martin

Carla Fernández: We’ve had some interesting results from the focus groups in the markets, Pierre. It seems we may have to change the group we’re targeting when we have the international launch. From the research, it looks as if we’ll need to target a lower age group. And perhaps reposition the brand, targeting the masculine adventurous, energetic male, rather than the sophisticated, aspiring urban man.
Pierre Martin: Oh, why’s that?
Carla Fernández: It’s really about the competition. A lot of top producers are coming out with premium brands aiming at the urban man. It seems that this segment of the market is well catered for — in fact, it’s becoming rather overcrowded. Givenchy, Jean-Paul Gaultier, Hugo Boss, even Kylie Minogue — they’re all launching male fragrances at the top end of the market.
Pierre Martin: I see. Well, it’ll mean changing the brand image of Physique. That’ll be a big step, and we’ll need to think it through.
Carla Fernández: Absolutely. Another thing that’s come out of the focus groups is, Physique is seen as a French brand, and it seems that won’t work in many of our target markets. We may need to change its name to appeal to an international audience, especially a younger one.
Pierre Martin: Mmm, does it mean Physique should no longer be a premium product? Are they saying we should market it as a high-volume mass-market fragrance?
Carla Fernández: Perhaps it may come to this. Certainly in the emerging markets, for example China, we could make a lot of money if we promoted it as a mass-market fragrance at an affordable price.
Pierre Martin: OK. Tell me about packaging. What did the research come up with? It’s essential that we get the packaging right.
Carla Fernández: Not good news, I’m afraid. The packaging we’re using here just isn’t appealing for most of the international markets. We’re going to have to think again and create a new look that’ll have universal appeal. And our creative team is going to have to produce a really exciting advertising campaign that we can use in all the markets, with a few changes here and there.
Pierre Martin: OK. Anything else the research found?
Carla Fernández: You’ll have a full report on your desk tomorrow. But one other thing, we’ll definitely need a new slogan if we change the audience we’re targeting. So that’s something else the Marketing Department must start thinking about.


Speaking. Product details


Read the product details and discuss the questions

Product details — Physique

Product shape: Tall, rounded bottle, solid appearance. Black, with the brand name in the centre. Silver top. Screw top or spray.

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Average retail prices:

  • 40ml $60
  • 75ml $75
  • 100ml $95
  • 125ml $110

The price places Physique in the top ten most expensive male fragrances.

Distribution in France: sold exclusively in parfumeries (specialised stores for cosmetics and toiletries) and in shops in top hotels.

Promotion: Commercials on French television; radio spots; full-page advertisements in prestigious magazines, e.g. Paris Match, Marie Claire, etc. Special promotions at high-class events such as Longchamp racing stadium, and in embassies and duty free shops at the airports.

Words associated with Physique by consumers (in order of frequency): masculine, sensual, sophisticated, elegant, energetic, alluring, spicy, glamorous, individualistic.

Quotation from sales literature: «Physique man is confident, ambitious and resilient. He is at home in any city and enjoys the challenge of urban life. He has a lot of creative energy, travels widely and is optimistic about the future.»

1. What image of the product do you have now after getting informed about the details?

2. Do you think Physique will be popular? Why (not)?


Read the information and brainstorm ideas

Preparation for the international marketing launch

Having received the results of research in a number of potential overseas markets, the Marketing Department of HCC has organised a meeting to brainstorm ideas for the global marketing strategy of Physique.

You are members of the Marketing Department of HCC.

  • Brainstorm the points listed in the rough notes.
  • Devise a one-minute television commercial for the international launch. Using a storyboard*, present the ideas.
    * A series of pictures showing the sequence of scenes (setting, action, dialogue) of a TV commercial. A storyboard helps marketing staff to visualise the concept for the commercial.

Brainstorm session

1. Which 10 countries should be chosen for the launch?

2. Does Physique need a new name? If so, what?

3. Should Physique continue to be targeted at the 30-40 age group? If not, what age group should it target?

4. Should Physique continue to be positioned as a premium fragrance, or should HCC market it as a mass fragrance, with a different pricing structure?

5. The container of Physique must be changed. How should the new container look? Plan the new packaging (shape, design, materials).

6. Price: Are the present pricing levels appropriate? Should HCC offer a cheaper version of Physique for emerging markets?

7. Distribution: Should HCC continue to sell the fragrance in exclusive outlets in overseas markets, or should it use a wider variety of outlets? If so, what sort of outlets should it choose?

8. Promotion: Who should be the international ambassador(s) for the brand? What special promotions could HCC organise in the overseas markets?

9. Physique needs a new slogan. Ideas?

10. Manufacture: Is it now time to manufacture the fragrance in low-cost countries? If so, which countries would be suitable?

Expert’s commentary


Watch the Case study commentary and answer the questions


Interviewer | Lis Credé

Interviewer: Lis Credé is an organization development consultant. She believes that the results of any organization can be improved by building the quality of the relationships within it, whether they are person to person, team to team, department to department, or organization to organization. Lis, what options for growth does the company have?
Lis Credé: I think there are two main options for growth. The first would be to take the name global, doing things in different markets in different ways, so the market is very competitive in the luxury end. So, picking up on the particular niches in each of the countries, doing this, for example, like Burberry, the fashion brand, did it – taking their distinctive pattern, but applying it to different pieces of clothing. So, that would be a way for them to compete in the market, very competitive market, and do so successfully by being more distinctive within that market.
The second option would be to go for a younger market, a different market for them, to reposition the fragrance, still going global but with a different positioning. Might be a bit more challenging for the cosmetics company, because it’s not a market they’re used to competing in.
Interviewer: What opportunities and risks does the company face in each case?
Lis Credé: Well, in the first one, going with the premium brand, taking that globally, opportunity is really high-end pricing, really pushing up the premium pricing to cope with those niche markets, so wonderful opportunity there bringing in a high profile celebrity, maybe a film star to back it up, that’s globally known. So, great opportunity. The risk there is that the competition can be expected to fight back fiercely and aggressively. So, they might get into a price war … Who knows … But that’s the risk.
For the second option of taking it to the younger market, they’ll have to lose their name name and rebrand the fragrance. The danger with that is that the heritage of the brand is lost and it will be equivalent to really launching a new brand globally rather than building on the track record of their name. If they keep with their name, then the danger is in the grey market traffic when … they’re sold lower … at a lower price in some of the markets. Traders can buy at that low price and then take it to a different country and sell at a higher price. So, that’s the danger in keeping the brand name same when you’re going to a different market. But the opportunity is huge, you know, China and Asia are big markets and the volume will definitely be there. The other risk is that they are not familiar with trading in a high volume low price market. It takes it different marketing strategy to do that and they might not have the expertise in-house to market in that particular field.


1. What options for growth does the company have?

2. What opportunities and risks does the company face in each case?

1. There are two main options for growth. The first would be to take the name global, doing things in different markets in different ways. The second option would be to go for a younger market, to reposition the fragrance, still going global with a different positioning.

2. In the first one, going with the premium brand, taking that globally. The risk there is that the competition can be expected to fight back fiercely and aggressively. For the second option of taking it to the younger market, they’ll have to loose their name and rebrand the fragrance. The danger with that is that the heritage of the brand is lost. Traders can buy at that low price and then take it to a different country and sell at a higher price.

Linking ideas


Match the appropriate sentence halves below 

A marketing letter


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The letter below was sent by an institute for management development to a large number of companies throughout Eastern and Central Europe. As you read it, complete it with the words below

 


Listen to the recording and complete the noun phrases


1. This year’s been marked by expanding overseas operations.

2. We’ve had to cope with an extremely volatile exchange rate.

3. All I can say is that it’s been an incredibly successful trade fair.

4. Do you know who’s the head of their new public relations department?

5. We’re going to launch a highly ambitious market research programme.


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Listen to 10 extracts from meetings and decide what the female speaker is doing in each one


Extract 1

Man | Woman

Man: Maybe this is just another wacky idea of mine.
Woman: Well, at this stage, we want all your ideas, however crazy you think they are.

Extract 2

Man | Woman

Man: OK! Right! Please! We’re about to start!
Woman: So … the purpose of the meeting this morning is to discuss ways of adapting our new soft drink for the South American market.

Extract 3

Man | Woman

Man: I think we need to look for ways to reduce manufacturing costs.
Woman: You’re absolutely right. That should be our priority.

Extract 4

Man | Woman

Man: Edith. I thought you wanted to say something.
Woman: Yes. Well, one thing we could do is modify the communications.

Extract 5

Man | Woman

Man: Let’s be radical and change both the product and the communications.
Woman: Wow! That’s the best idea I’ve heard for a long time.

Extract 6

Man | Woman

Man: I think it’s really worth sponsoring some kind of event.
Woman: Definitely. That’s what our main competitors are doing, and it seems to be working quite well. So yes, I’m with you on that.

Extract 7

Man | Woman

Man: Erm … Well … No. I thought I had an idea, but …
Woman: … Don’t hold back, Roger. Just say whatever comes to mind.

Extract 8

Man | Woman

Man: So what’s on the agenda?
Woman: Well, what we need to achieve today is see what conclusions we can draw from Tom’s market research report and then discuss the way forward on the basis of that.

Extract 9

Man | Woman

Man: I have some good news. We can spend 50,000 euros on press advertising.
Woman: Fantastic!

Extract 10

Man | Woman

Man: Any other ideas?
Woman: I think we could spend more on Internet advertising.


Homework. Writing practice


Read the letter

Central European Institute for Management Development
Hviezdoslavovo nam. 128
812 03 Bratislava
20 June

Dear Sir or Madam,

I have pleasure in enclosing five copies of our new brochure, detailing the Strategic Leadership programme and the Advanced Management Programme available here at the Bratislava Central European Institute for Management Development for entry next September.

I should be grateful if you could please forward the brochure as appropriate within your organisation, so that it is available to both the Head of Human Resources and employees when considering professional development options.

In addition, I enclose a poster which includes prepaid response cards and should be most grateful if you could arrange for this to be displayed.

Should you require further copies of either brochure or poster, please contact Igor Cutka at our Admissions Office by email on I.Cutka3@pk.uniba.sk.

Finally, I hope you and your staff find the brochure of interest.

Yours faithfully,

Irene Trollerova

Head of the CEIMD


Ivan Gasperlin, the manager of Kommerz Bank (Trubarjeva 47,1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia) wishes to order five more copies of both the brochure and the poster. Write an e-mail message with the request

Instructions

1. Read the task and study the sample carefully.

2. Plan what you are going to write about.

3. Write according to your plan.

4. Check your writing before sending it for evaluation.

5. Learn the rules and see the sample here.

6. Please use Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.


Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Brainstorming practice
  • Creating a global brand
  • Speaking. Product details
  • Expert’s commentary
  • Linking ideas
  • A marketing letter
  • Nouns in connected speech
  • Interaction during meeting
  • Writing practice
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing