Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs

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Choose the statements you agree with and explain why. Use the words from the Wordlist

«Your career success in the workplace of today – independent of technical expertise – depends on the quality of your people skills.»

— Max Messmer Jr., Managing Your Career for Dummies


«Don’t confuse having a career with having a life.»

— Hillary Rodham Clinton


«Our careers aren’t paths so much as landscapes that are navigated.»

— Keith Ferrazzi, Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time


«When you reach the middle of your career ladder, turn it the other way around and slide down to the top.»

— Benny Bellamacina, Philosophical Uplifting Quotes and Poems


Wordlist

1. make a career 8. make progress 15. do part-time work
2. take a career break 9. make a living 16. do your best
3. decide on a career plan 10. get a promotion 17. take early retirement
4. career path 11. get fired 18. take time off
5. climb a career ladder 12. get the sack 19. work flexitime
6. career opportunity 13. earn commission 20. work anti-social hours
7. make a fortune 14. earn 21. work overtime

Listen to the first part of the interview and answer these questions

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Melissa Foux

Interviewer: Can you tell us about your job?
Melissa Foux: I’m currently the Finance Director of CSC Media Limited, Chart Show Channels Group, which is the largest independent television business in the UK. We have a mixture of 16 channels — some are music, some are children’s and some are movie channels.
Interviewer: What was your previous job?
Melissa Foux: I was previously the Finance Director of a chocolate-pudding business, so very different from television. But, um, the good thing about being in the finance world is that it’s relatively easy to move from sector to sector. The basic skills that you need are, are similar in each case.

1. How does she describe her current company?
2. What was her previous job?
3. Why is it easy to move from sector to sector in the finance world?


Listen to the second part and complete this extract

to do an internship — to do a job that lasts for a short time, that someone, especially a student, does in order to gain experience

accountancy firm — a company that keeps or checks financial accounts, calculates taxes etc.

to start off as an auditor — to begin the career as someone whose job is to officially examine a company’s financial records


Interviewer: How did you get into finance as a career?
Melissa Foux: When I was a student, although l was studying chemistry, I thought I would like to do something, er, different afterwards, and I actually did a summer internship with one of the big accountancy firms, um, which was, which was an excellent way to get an understanding of what the job would be like. I started off as an auditor, and it was, it was through that experience that I got my first job.

Listen to the third part and number these points in the order in which she mentions them

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to overcomplicate — to make a problem or situation too difficult

to get bogged down — to be/become so involved in something difficult or complicated that you cannot do anything else

to maintain clarity — to keep it clear, to understand


Interviewer: Have you had any good advice during your career?
Melissa Foux: Um, yes, I’ve had lots of advice during my working career. I think the thing that stands out is, really, not to overcomplicate things. Um, especially in the finance world, people can get bogged down in a lot of detail, and it’s important to try and maintain clarity and always be able to see above all the numbers that you’re given and all the data, and what is really the key point and the key decision you have to make.


Listen to the final part and decide which was the interviewer’s question

to apply for — to ask officially for something, often by writing

It makes all the difference — This is what has an effect on a situation.


What I found, in coming across people who’ve applied for positions in the companies I’ve worked, um, in, is … the key difference is, people who’ve done a lot of research on the companies that they’ve applied to. People have taken the time to, not just read company accounts, but, you know, research on what the company is moving into, and are able to really ask those interesting questions at interview. It makes all the difference. So I say, research is the key.

Watch the whole interview and summarize the information in your own words

Interviewer: Can you tell us about your job?
Melissa Foux: I’m currently the Finance Director of CSC Media Limited, Chart Show Channels Group, which is the largest independent television business in the UK. We have a mixture of 16 channels — some are music, some are children’s and some are movie channels.
Interviewer: What was your previous job?
Melissa Foux: I was previously the Finance Director of a chocolate-pudding business, so very different from television. But, um, the good thing about being in the finance world is that it’s relatively easy to move from sector to sector. The basic skills that you need are, are similar in each case.
Interviewer: How did you get into finance as a career?
Melissa Foux: When I was a student, although I was studying chemistry, I thought I would like to do something, er, different afterwards, and I actually did a summer internship with one of the big accountancy firms, um, which was, which was an excellent way to get an understanding of what the job would be like. I started off as an auditor, and it was, it was through that experience that I got my first job.
Interviewer: Have you had any good advice during your career?
Melissa Foux: Um, yes, I’ve had lots of advice during my working career. I think the thing that stands out is, really, not to overcomplicate things. Um, especially in the finance world, people can get bogged down in a lot of detail, and it’s important to try and maintain clarity and always be able to see above all the numbers that you’re given and all the data, and what is really the key point and the key decision you have to make. What I found, in coming across people who’ve applied for positions in the companies I’ve worked, um, in, is … the key difference is, people who’ve done a lot of research on the companies that they’ve applied to. People have taken the time to, not just read company accounts, but, you know, research on what the company is moving into, and are able to really ask those interesting questions at interview.

Match these functions to the examples

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Read the rule

Form

+

I/You/He/She/It/We/They can go.

I/You/He/She/It/We/They can’t (= cannot) go.

?

Can I/You/He/She/It/We/They go

Can and could

We use can and could to

Example

make requests Can I make a phone call?
Could you tell me the time, please? (a little more formal)
give or refuse permission You can use my mobile phone.
You can’t go in there. It’s private.
make an offer Can I help you?
I can take you to the station if you like.
describe ability Paola can speak Chinese.
When he was younger, he could (= was able to) run a marathon in under three hours.
say that something is possible or impossible You can make a lot of money if you work hard.
I can’t get through to them. Their phone’s always engaged.

Could

We use could to

Example

refer to future possibilities I think we could increase our market share in the long term.

Would

We use would to

Example

make requests Would you open the door for me, please?
make offers Would you like a glass of water?
describe imaginary situations I would buy a Ferrari if I had enough money.

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Rearrange the words to make questions from a job interview


Read the phrases. What category do they belong to?

Match the questions to the interviewee’s answers

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currently — at the present time

notice period — the period of time that an employee must work in their job after they have said that they are leaving, or after they have been asked to leave



Choose a role of an interviewer or an interviewee. The teacher will play the other role. Then switch roles

The interviewer asks the questions below and the interviewee answers them truthfully.


1. Offer tea or coffee.

2. Find out the interviewee’s ability to:

a) speak any languages;
b) use Excel, PowerPoint or Publisher;
c) drive.

3. Ask the interviewee:

a) to tell you about themselves;
b) for the best number to contact them tomorrow;
c) to repeat the number;
d) if they would like to work abroad;
e) if there are any hours they wouldn’t be able to work.

Listen to three phone calls and answer these questions

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VTS reception: Good morning, VTS. Which department, please?
Sophie Boiteaud: I’d like to speak to Corina Molenaar in Human Resources, please.
VTS reception: Thank you. Hold on. I’ll put you through.
Corina Molenaar: Hello. Human Resources.
Sophie Boiteaud: Hello. Is that Corina Molenaar?
Corina Molenaar: Speaking.
Sophie Boiteaud: Yes, I’m phoning about your advert in Careers Now. Could you send me an application form, please?
Corina Molenaar: Certainly. Can I take some details? Could you give me your name and address, please?
Sophie Boiteaud: Yes, sure, it’s Sophie Boiteaud, which is B-O-l-T-E-A-U-D. And my address is …

Johan: Hello. Could I speak to Giovanna, please?
Secretary: I’m afraid she’s not here at the moment. Can I take a message?
Johan: Yes, please. This is Johan from Intec. Could you tell her I won’t be able to make the training course on Saturday? She can call me back if there’s a problem. I’m on 0191 498 0051.
Secretary: OK. Thank you. Bye.

Matt: Hello, Matt speaking.
Karl: Hi, Matt. Karl here.
Matt: Oh, hello, Karl. How are you?
Karl: Fine, thanks. Listen, just a quick word.
Matt: Yeah, go ahead.
Karl: Do you think you could let me have the other number for Workplace Solutions? I can’t get through to them. Their phone’s always engaged.
Matt: Er, I’ve got it here. It’s 020 9756 4237.
Karl: Sorry, I didn’t catch the last part. Did you say 4227?
Matt: No, it’s 4237.
Karl: OK. Thanks. Bye.
Matt: No problem. Bye.

Question — Call 1 — Call 2 — Call 3

▶ What is the purpose of each call?

▶ Do the callers know each other?

Call 1 — No; Call 2 — No; Call 3 — Yes


Listen to the first call again. Complete the expressions on the right so they have the same meaning as the ones on the left

VTS reception: Good morning, VTS. Which department, please?
Sophie Boiteaud: I’d like to speak to Corina Molenaar in Human Resources, please.
VTS reception: Thank you. Hold on. I’ll put you through.
Corina Molenaar: Hello. Human Resources.
Sophie Boiteaud: Hello. Is that Corina Molenaar?
Corina Molenaar: Speaking.
Sophie Boiteaud: Yes, I’m phoning about your advert in Careers Now. Could you send me an application form, please?
Corina Molenaar: Certainly. Can I take some details? Could you give me your name and address, please?
Sophie Boiteaud: Yes, sure, it’s Sophie Boiteaud, which is B-O-l-T-E-A-U-D. And my address is …

Listen to the second call again and complete this extract

pic8_Business|Int|L2


Johan: Hello. Could I speak to Giovanna, please?
Secretary: I’m afraid she’s not here at the moment. Can I take a message?
Johan: Yes, please. This is Johan from Intec. Could you tell her I won’t be able to make the training course on Saturday? She can call me back if there’s a problem. I’m on 0191 498 0051.
Secretary: OK.Thank you. Bye.


Listen to the third call again. Select and write the words the speaker uses

Matt: Hello, Matt speaking.
Karl: Hi, Matt. Karl here.
Matt: Oh, hello, Karl. How are you?
Karl: Fine, thanks. Listen, just a quick word.
Matt: Yeah, go ahead.
Karl: Do you think you could let me have the other number for Workplace Solutions? I can’t get through to them. Their phone’s always engaged.
Matt: Er, I’ve got it here. It’s 020 9756 4237.
Karl: Sorry, I didn’t catch the last part. Did you say 4227?
Matt: No, it’s 4237.
Karl: OK. Thanks. Bye.
Matt: No problem. Bye.

Listen to part one and match the two parts of these expressions

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Melissa Foux

Interviewer: Can you tell us about your job?
Melissa Foux: I’m currently the Finance Director of CSC Media Limited, Chart Show Channels Group, which is the largest independent television business in the UK. We have a mixture of 16 channels — some are music, some are children’s and some are movie channels.
Interviewer: What was your previous job?
Melissa Foux: I was previously the Finance Director of a chocolate-pudding business, so, very different from television. But, um, the good thing about being in the finance world is that it’s relatively easy to move from sector to sector. The basic skills that you need are, are similar in each case.

If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this 🔗link and listen to it once more.



Now put the expressions into these groups

Listen to parts one and two and replace the verbs in italic with the infinitive forms of the verbs that Melissa Foux actually uses. One of the verbs she uses is a phrasal verb


If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.



If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.



Listen to parts three and four. Choose the correct alternative to replace the expression in italic so as to keep the closest meaning


If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.



If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.


Complete the interviewer’s questions. Put the words in the correct form

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Match the interviewee’s answers to the interviewer’s questions

Would you mind working at weekends? — Not at all, as long as it’s in the morning.

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Study the examples. Then complete the dialogues below with could оr was able to

could (general ability)

— Can you use a PC?
— Yes, I can. In fact, I could use a PC when I was 10!

was able to (one occasion)

— So, were you late for the interview?
— No. Sue gave me a lift, so I was able to get there in time.


Read the article from the Financial Times

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Retail banking: Appeal of the softer side of the business

Clare Gascoigne

Retail banking used to be an aspirational career. But as the banks have changed, so has the attraction. «Graduates have to be led into thinking about retail banking,» says Terry Jones of the Association of Graduate Career Advisory Services. «They think first about the investment banks or accountancy — they think retail is not as interesting as working on mergers and acquisitions or trading.»

He may be right. High-street bank managers are no longer as respected as they used to be. Staff are much more concerned with selling products and financial services, and much of the customer contact has moved to big call centres or the Internet. «The work feels relatively low status,» says Mr Jones.

However, the banks don’t feel the same way. «We are looking for people who are customer driven, who can form good working relationships and lead sales teams,» says John Morewood, senior manager for graduate recruiting at HSBC. «We look for graduates who have had experience of working with customers.»

HSBC is typical of the high-street banks in running two main graduate schemes. The executive management scheme is a two-year development programme that aims to put graduates into a leadership role. It takes between 25 and 30 every year. «These people have the potential to go very high,» says Mr Morewood. «We are looking for strategic thinkers.»

The second scheme, which is more concerned with retail and commercial banking, takes between 120 and 150 people a year and gives graduates responsibility much earlier.


Choose the correct meaning for the words in italics

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Read the text again and decide if the statements are True or False

Retail banking: Appeal of the softer side of the business

Clare Gascoigne

Retail banking used to be an aspirational career. But as the banks have changed, so has the attraction. «Graduates have to be led into thinking about retail banking,» says Terry Jones of the Association of Graduate Career Advisory Services. «They think first about the investment banks or accountancy — they think retail is not as interesting as working on mergers and acquisitions or trading.»

He may be right. High-street bank managers are no longer as respected as they used to be. Staff are much more concerned with selling products and financial services, and much of the customer contact has moved to big call centres or the Internet. «The work feels relatively low status,» says Mr Jones.

However, the banks don’t feel the same way. «We are looking for people who are customer driven, who can form good working relationships and lead sales teams,» says John Morewood, senior manager for graduate recruiting at HSBC. «We look for graduates who have had experience of working with customers.»

HSBC is typical of the high-street banks in running two main graduate schemes. The executive management scheme is a two-year development programme that aims to put graduates into a leadership role. It takes between 25 and 30 people every year. «These people have the potential to go very high,» says Mr Morewood. «We are looking for strategic thinkers.»

The second scheme, which is more concerned with retail and commercial banking, takes between 120 and 150 people a year and gives graduates responsibility much earlier.


Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Changing jobs
  • Good advice
  • The whole interview
  • Modals 1: ability, request
  • A request, an offer or asking about ability
  • Questions and answers
  • Telephoning: making call
  • Other calls
  • CSC Media Limited
  • Expressions
  • Requests
  • Past abilities
  • Retail banking
  • Graduate schemes
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing