Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies

Which adjectives and verbs could come in front of the word company?

pic1_Business|Int|L4


Company

My dream company


Which of these companies do you or would you like to work for?

Factors / Type of company A family-owned company A multinational company Your own company

(be self-employed)

Work environment

Pay

Promotion

possibilities

Job security

(probability that

you will keep the job)


Can you name a company in each of these business sectors? Is there one that you would like to work for?

1. Telecommunications/Media
2. Engineering
3. Pharmaceuticals/Chemicals
4. Construction
5. Banking and finance
6. Transport
7. Manufacturing
8. IT/Electronics
9. Food and drink
10. Retailing
11. Another service industry
12. Tourism

Complete the chart. Then make sentences about the companies similar to the example

Cisco Systems is an American company which supplies Internet equipment.



Complete the sentences below with the words and phrases

Complete this extract from a company report with the appropriate words or phrases

pic2_Business|Int|L4



Listen to the CEO reading from the company report and check your answers

1. We are planning …
2. We have successfully …
3. We have increased/decreased our …
4. We have had excellent/poor/average performance.
5. Increased /Decreased production and strong/weak demand have …

I am pleased to say the parent company has continued its excellent performance. We are changing, growing and doing well at a difficult time for the industry. Turnover was €57.2 million, an increase of 15% on last year, and net profit rose by 5% to €6.4 million.

We are a highly competitive business. We have increased our market share to 20%. Consequently, our share price has risen and is now at an all-time high of €9.6.

Increased production and strong demand have had a positive effect on our cashflow, so we are able to finance a number of new projects. We have successfully moved to our new head office in central London. We are now planning to start full production at the recently opened Spanish subsidiary in October.

Finally, thanks once again to our loyal and dedicated workforce. Our employees will always be our most valuable asset.

Listen to the first part of an interview with Susan Barratt, the Chief Executive Officer of Nature’s Way Foods, and correct six mistakes in this paragraph

pic3_Business|Int|L4
Susan Barratt

Interviewer: Can you tell us about your company?
Susan Barratt: Nature’s Way Foods is a food-manufacturing company based on the south coast of England. We put chilled product, the majority of which is lettuce and fruit, into various types of packaging for the major retailers and various food-service companies in the UK. Examples of retailers would be Tesco’s, Morrison’s and Waitrose, and in terms of food-service companies, our biggest customer is McDonald’s, which I’m sure most of you will be familiar with.


Listen to the second part, where Susan talks about the reasons for the company’s success, and complete these notes with one word from the list in each gap

Interviewer: What are the reasons for the company’s success?
Susan Barratt: There are various reasons for the company’s success. I think one of the major ones is the markets in which we operate. There are some, what we call «big marketing themes», which are: health, convenience, sustainability and indulgence. We think the products we produce in both leaf and fruit fit a lot of those themes. So a majority of the UK population have a desire to eat healthy products. They tend to be what we call «time-poor», i.e. they haven’t got much time in their lives for creating great food, so they want to be able to buy a convenient product of good, healthy food. There was also a theme for sustainability, so people want to feel like they are contributing towards a sustainable world, and a lot of our product has a fairly low level of what we call food miles and therefore is fairly sustainable. Some of our products also have a fairly indulgent feel, so the UK population, er, has a habit of wanting to be indulgent at certain times. So they might diet on a Monday to Friday, but when it gets to Friday night, they will have several pieces of cake and maybe a few drinks. I think the other reason for our success is the way we run our business. We are a high-volume business, so we’re producing hundreds of millions of units, so we need to be very efficient in the way we produce them. So we’ve invested heavily as a business in systems and process, to make sure we are very efficient in the manner in which we produce the products for our customers.

pic4_Business|Int|L4


Listen to the third part and answer these questions

Interviewer: When running a company, what have you enjoyed most and least?
Susan Barratt: I think most is achieving what you set out to achieve. So when you’re running a company, one of your key objectives, or key roles, is to set the strategy for the company, and then make sure the building blocks are in place to achieve that strategy. And that I find very satisfying – to set a clear goal for the business and then watch the business, and help the business go and achieve that goal.
I think the other thing which I find very satisfying is creating a team ethic and watching the people grow, and watching people develop and work towards the goals that you set as a business, and work as a team and get enjoyment out of that, and develop as people and as businesspeople within the organisation.
Interviewer: And least?
Susan Barratt: I think least is probably the relentlessness of the role as a chief executive. You’re never actually off duty, and a business like ours, which is a food-manufacturing company, it’s running 364 days a year, so there’s always something to be responsible for and something that’s happening within your organisation. So I think that can be quite tiring. And also, the other thing that sometimes can be wearing, is it is quite a lonely life. You know, you have to make decisions, sometimes you can’t talk to other people about them, and they have to be your decisions.

1. What two things has Susan enjoyed most when running a company?
2. What doesn’t she enjoy about running a company?


Listen to the final part and complete this extract

Interviewer: What lessons have you learned from the companies you’ve worked for?
Susan Barratt: I’ve learned a lot of lessons from the companies I’ve worked for. I think the key thing is that you have to make sure your people in the organisation are engaged with the organisation and have a clear understanding of what that organisation is trying to achieve. If you can get that clarity of direction and enthusiasm from the people within the organisation, then that will help move the business forward in itself.

Watch the whole interview and answer the questions

Interviewer: Can you tell us about your company?
Susan Barratt: Nature’s Way Foods is a food-manufacturing company based on the south coast of England. We put chilled product, the majority of which is lettuce and fruit, into various types of packaging for the major retailers and various food-service companies in the UK. Examples of retailers would be Tesco’s, Morrison’s and Waitrose, and in terms of food-service companies, our biggest customer is McDonald’s, which I’m sure most of you will be familiar with.
Interviewer: What are the reasons for the company’s success?
Susan Barratt: There are various reasons for the company’s success. I think one of the major ones is the markets in which we operate. There are some, what we call «big marketing themes», which are: health, convenience, sustainability and indulgence. We think the products we produce in both leaf and fruit fit a lot of those themes. So a majority of the UK population have a desire to eat healthy products. They tend to be what we call «time-poor», i.e. they haven’t got much time in their lives for creating great food, so they want to be able to buy a convenient product of good, healthy food. There was also a theme for sustainability, so people want to feel like they are contributing towards a sustainable world, and a lot of our product has a fairly low level of of what we call food miles and therefore is fairly sustainable. Some of our products also have a fairly indulgent feel, so the UK population, er, has a habit of wanting to be indulgent at certain times. So they might diet on a Monday to Friday, but when it gets to Friday night, they will have several pieces of cake and maybe a few drinks. I think the other reason for our success is the way we run our business. We are a high-volume business, so we’re producing hundreds of millions of units, so we need to be very efficient in the way we produce them. So we’ve invested heavily as a business in systems and process, to make sure we are very efficient in the manner in which we produce the products for our customers.
Interviewer: When running a company, what have you enjoyed most and least?
Susan Barratt: I think most is achieving what you set out to achieve. So when you’re running a company, one of your key objectives, or key roles, is to set the strategy for the company, and then make sure the building blocks are in place to achieve that strategy. And that I find very satisfying – to set a clear goal for the business and then watch the business, and help the business go and achieve that goal. I think the other thing which I find very satisfying is creating a team ethic and watching the people grow, and watching people develop and work towards the goals that you set as a business, and work as a team and get enjoyment out of that, and develop as people and as businesspeople within the organisation.
Interviewer: And least?
Susan Barratt: I think least is probably the relentlessness of the role as a chief executive. You’re never actually off duty, and a business like ours, which is a food-manufacturing company, it’s running 364 days a year, so there’s always something to be responsible for and something that’s happening within your organisation. So I think that can be quite tiring. And also, the other thing that sometimes can be wearing, is it is quite a lonely life. You know, you have to make decisions, sometimes you can’t talk to other people about them, and they have to be your decisions.
Interviewer: What lessons have you learned from the companies you’ve worked for?
Susan Barratt: I’ve learned a lot of lessons from the companies I’ve worked for. I think the key thing is that you have to make sure your people in the organisation are engaged with the organisation and have a clear understanding of what that organisation is trying to achieve. If you can get that clarity of direction and enthusiasm from the people within the organisation, then that will help move the business forward in itself.

1. What have you learned about the company?
2. Is the company successful? Can you prove it?
3. When running a company, what are the most and least enjoyable things?
4. What lessons has Susan learned from the companies she’s worked for?

Review the information about prepositions and complete the extract from a company report

pic5_Business|Int|L4


«At»

  • Used to point out specific time:
    I will meet you at 12 p.m.
    We will open a new office at the beginning of the year.
  • Used to indicate a place:
    There is a corporate event at the club house.

«In»

  • Used for not specific times during a day, month, season, year:
    The new semester will start in March.
  • Used to name the sphere where something appears:
    We’ve noticed a slight reduction in the price of oil.

«By»

  • Used to say how great a change or difference is (after verbs):
    The price of oil fell by $2 a barrel last week.

«Of»

  • Used to state specifically what a particular number, amount, age etc (after nouns) is:
    He became a CEO at the age of 52.
    This led to an increase of 3%.

«To»

  • Used to indicate the point to which something has risen or fallen:
    The annual income fell down to $2,5 billion.

«On»

  • Used if something affects or is related to something else:
    What effect will these changes have on the tourist industry?

«For»

  • Used in the meaning «with regard to», or «in respect of»:
    She is responsible for the efficient running of their department.

Pinelcom

Financial performance

Pinelcom is committed (at/by/for/in/of/to/on) creating and delivering value — value to its customers, value to its employees and value to the region. Our success in moving towards this goal is most evident in the financial results for this year.



Match the companies to the industry sector they belong to


IT (Information Technology) — Lenovo, Apple, Dell, Microsoft


pic6_Business|Int|L4


Read the sentences and write the missing letters to complete the words

Listen to part one and find the answers for the points below

Interviewer: Can you tell us about your company?
Susan Barratt: Nature’s Way Foods is a food-manufacturing company based on the south coast of England. We put chilled product, the majority of which is lettuce and fruit, into various types of packaging for the major retailers and various food-service companies in the UK. Examples of retailers would be Tesco’s, Morrison’s and Waitrose, and in terms of food-service companies, our biggest customer is McDonald’s, which I’m sure most of you will be familiar with.

If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.



Listen to part two and complete the table with words that Susan Barratt uses

Interviewer: What are the reasons for the company’s success?
Susan Barratt: There are various reasons for the company’s success. I think one of the major ones is the markets in which we operate. There are some, what we call «big marketing themes», which are: health, convenience, sustainability and indulgence. We think the products we produce in both leaf and fruit fit a lot of those themes. So a majority of the UK population have a desire to eat healthy products. They tend to be what we call «time-poor», i.e. they haven’t got much time in their lives for creating great food, so they want to be able to buy a convenient product of good, healthy food.
There was also a theme for sustainability, so people want to feel like they are contributing towards a sustainable world, and a lot of our product has a fairly low level of what we call food miles and therefore is fairly sustainable.
Some of our products also have a fairly indulgent feel, so the UK population, er, has a habit of wanting to be indulgent at certain times. So they might diet on a Monday to Friday, but when it gets to Friday night, they will have several pieces of cake and maybe a few drinks.
I think the other reason for our success is the way we run our business. We are a high-volume business, so we’re producing hundreds of millions of units, so we need to be very efficient in the way we produce them. So we’ve invested heavily as a business in systems and processes, to make sure we are very efficient in the manner in which we produce the products for our customers.

If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.


Match the adjectives to their meanings in this context

pic4_Business|Int|L4



Listen to part three. Which of these things does Susan Barratt mention?


If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.


Read the article from the Financial Times

pic7_Business|Int|L4

HP beats forecasts and raises outlook

Kevin Allison

Hewlett Packard, the world’s second-biggest computer maker, continued to benefit from its $1.9bn cost-cutting drive after it reported higher profits for the third quarter and raised its outlook for the year. HP reported net earnings of 48 cents a share — sharply higher than the 3 cents a share reported one year ago.

Mark Hurd, who launched the company’s $1.9bn restructuring after he became chief executive last year, said: «We remain focused on growth and continue to perform well in the market.» He said HP was on track to close its latest cost-cutting round by the end of the year, although he added that the company would «always be looking for ways to optimise» costs.

Sales grew by 6 per cent to $21.9bn as HP expanded in growing Asian markets and saw renewed activity in its core US market. HP shares rose by 1.3 per cent to $34.43 ahead of the announcement.

Mr Hurd said that the company’s personal computer division saw margins of 4 per cent — the highest since HP bought Compaq, a rival personal computer maker, for $21bn in 2002. «We continue to see a competitive environment (in PCs), but I would not call it an extraordinarily difficult (environment),» he said.

HP, which makes products ranging from laptop computers to printers and servers that power corporate data networks, said revenues in the Americas grew by 8 per cent year on year to $9.7bn.

Asia also experienced strong growth, with revenue up 7 per cent. Sales in Europe, the Middle East and Africa were behind, however, with revenues up just 2 per cent.


Match the numbers with what they refer to


pic8_Business|Int|L4


Read the text again and complete each sentence below with a preposition from the box

HP beats forecasts and raises outlook

Kevin Allison

Hewlett Packard, the world’s second-biggest computer maker, continued to benefit from its $1.9bn cost-cutting drive after it reported higher profits for the third quarter and raised its outlook for the year. HP reported net earnings of 48 cents a share — sharply higher than the 3 cents a share reported one year ago.

Mark Hurd, who launched the company’s $1.9bn restructuring after he became chief executive last year, said: «We remain focused on growth and continue to perform well in the market.» He said HP was on track to close its latest cost-cutting round by the end of the year, although he added that the company would «always be looking for ways to optimise» costs.

Sales grew by 6 per cent to $21.9bn as HP expanded in growing Asian markets and saw renewed activity in its core US market. HP shares rose by 1.3 per cent to $34.43 ahead of the announcement.

Mr Hurd said that the company’s personal computer division saw margins of 4 per cent — the highest since HP bought Compaq, a rival personal computer maker, for $21bn in 2002. «We continue to see a competitive environment (in PCs), but I would not call it an extraordinarily difficult (environment),» he said.

HP, which makes products ranging from laptop computers to printers and servers that power corporate data networks, said revenues in the Americas grew by 8 per cent year on year to $9.7bn.

Asia also experienced strong growth, with revenue up 7 per cent. Sales in Europe, the Middle East and Africa were behind, however, with revenues up just 2 per cent.


Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • My dream company
  • Describing companies
  • A company report
  • A successful company
  • Final parts
  • The whole interview
  • Prepositions in a report
  • Missing letters
  • «Nature’s way food»
  • The job of CEO
  • «Hewlett-Packard»
  • Prepositions from the text
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing