Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales


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«I’m very proud of my gold pocket watch. My grandfather, on his deathbed, sold me this watch.»

— Woody Allen, American actor, writer, director and comedian

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convenience store — a shop where you can buy food, alcohol, magazines etc, that is often open 24 hours each day

department store — a large store, often with many floors and divided into departments, each selling a different type of goods, e.g. Harrods, Selfridges (London): KaDeWe (Berlin), Macy’s, Bloomingdales (New York), Karstadt (Germany), El Corte Ingles (Spain), Mitsukoshi, Sogo (Japan)

specialist retailer — an individual store or part of a chain selling one type of goods, e.g. electrical goods, shoes, books, etc.

shopping centre/mall — a group of shops together in one area, often in one large building. A shopping center/mall is usually bigger than a department store


Answer the questions

1. What do you like about shopping? What don’t you like?

2. When did you last visit these retail outlets? What did you buy?

a) a (street) market
b) a convenience store
c) a supermarket
d) a department store
e) a specialist retailer
f) a shopping centre/mall
g) an online retailer


Listen to three people talking about their shopping habits and answer these questions

Extract 1
I like shopping for things I’m interested in buying, like clothes, but I really hate going to the supermarket. I just find it really boring, walking round and round looking for things. Supermarkets don’t seem very well organised for customers. They have fruit and vegetables near the entrance, but then heavy things are further away and they move things around, which makes it difficult. Often the staff don’t know where things are and can’t help you!

Extract 2
I love the Internet for shopping. I buy lots of things on it. It’s just so easy and convenient. Most retailers now work online. You can compare prices and products so easily. I also like the auction sites like eBay — you can get some real bargains. Some people say it’s risky to shop this way, things can go wrong, but I’ve never had a problem. A lot of my friends like shopping malls, but I really hate them. They’re always so crowded, and they make me feel tired.

Extract 3
I enjoy the experience of shopping — you know, being a customer, being made to feel special. I prefer specialist shops where service is more personal, where people remember you, know your name and can help you. I also like trying to get discounts when I’m shopping, actually doing a deal with the assistants. I really enjoy shopping for shoes. I don’t think it’s something you can do on the Internet, although I know people do.

1. What do they like and dislike?
2. Which shopper are you most similar to?
3. How are shopping habits changing in your country?

Choose the correct word to complete each sentence

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A … is another name for a «producer».

  • supplier
  • distributor
  • manufacturer


Combine the words to make word partnerships. Use the definitions below to help you

Look at the retail outlets again. Where would you buy the following items? Why?

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Which factors would you expect to be important in each purchase? Discuss your ideas

Purchases

  • a pair of shoes — music — fruit
  • a bottle of perfume/cologne — a holiday — a watch / piece of jewellery
  • furniture — a book — concert tickets

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Sue Leeson

Sue Leeson is Director of Marketing at QVC, the global shopping channel.
Listen to the first part of the interview and answer these questions

DIY — «Do It Yourself» — products necessary for making or repairing things yourself instead of paying someone else to do it (e.g. home-made soap).


Interviewer: What does QVC do?
Sue Leeson: QVC is a global multichannel retailer. We sell products across a wide variety of categories, from food through to fashion, through to accessories, through to beauty, to gardening and DIY. And we sell to consumers in Germany, Japan, USA, UK and Italy, and we sell both through our… the television and online.

1. What are the six product groups that she mentions?
2. QVC sells to consumers in what countries?
3. What two media are used to sell QVCs products?

In the second part, Sue talks about the secret of a really good product presentation. Listen and complete this paragraph


Interviewer: What’s the secret of a really good sales presentation?
Sue Leeson: Firstly, having a product that you can easily demonstrate and a product that has a good story behind it. Secondly, that the person who’s actually giving the sales presentation can engage with their audience in a credible fashion, can tell the story very clearly and can demonstrate the features and benefits of each product in a very clear and easy-to-understand way.
Interviewer: Can you give us an example of how you develop a sales pitch?
Sue Leeson: First of all, it’s all in the preparation, so it’s all about knowing the product inside and out, what the product can do, what it can’t do, when it is suitable, when the product isn’t suitable, and then be able to demonstrate the product to its best advantage in a very clear and precise fashion, but also in an engaging way.


Listen again and complete these notes

Interviewer: What’s the secret of a really good sales presentation?
Sue Leeson: Firstly, having a product that you can easily demonstrate and a product that has a good story behind it. Secondly, that the person who’s actually giving the sales presentation can engage with their audience in a credible fashion, can tell the story very clearly and can demonstrate the features and benefits of each product in a very clear and easy-to-understand way.
Interviewer: Can you give us an example of how you develop a sales pitch?
Sue Leeson: First of all, it’s all in the preparation, so it’s all about knowing the product inside and out, what the product can do, what it can’t do, when it is suitable, when the product isn’t suitable, and then be able to demonstrate the product to its best advantage in a very clear and precise fashion, but also in an engaging way.

Listen to the third part and answer these questions


Interviewer: What was QVC’s most successful product sale, and why?
Sue Leeson: We have many successful product areas. One of our strongest is beauty.
Beauty works so well on TV for two reasons. First of all, each beauty brand has a fantastic story behind it, and we can really bring life to the brand and to the product presentation through telling that story in a very engaging way.
And, secondly, each product is very easy to demonstrate. So if it’s a skincare product, like a moisturiser, we can show how to apply it, how much to apply in order to give the best effects. Finally, we add another layer to our sales presentation in that we may invite the expert behind that product to tell the story.
Interviewer: Are some types of product easier to sell than others?
Sue Leeson: Yes, and in fact some products are very difficult to sell on our business model. So take fragrance, for example. Clearly the main, er, piece you want to communicate with a fragrance is how it smells, and that can be very challenging to do through a television environment.

1. Why are beauty products easy to sell on TV?
2. Which type of product is difficult to sell and why?


Listen to the final part. If customers want to buy a skin product, what four things can they see on the QVC website?

Interviewer: How has online shopping altered the way you sell?
Sue Leeson: It’s given us a fantastic opportunity to sell in a different way to our consumers. So if a customer wants to buy a skin care product at 10 o’clock at night, and perhaps on air we’re showing a gardening item, she can now go down to our website, she can browse through the range of products online that suit her at that moment in time, she can see an image of the product, she can see the product description, she can see what other customers think about the product through our ratings and review service, and as well she can see the video demonstration. So it opens up our range of 15,000 products to the customer at any time, day or night.

Watch the whole interview

Interviewer: What does QVC do?
Sue Leeson: QVC is a global multichannel retailer. We sell products across a wide variety of categories, from food through to fashion, through to accessories, through to beauty, to gardening and DIY. And we sell to consumers in Germany, Japan, USA, UK and Italy, and we sell both through our — the television and online.
Interviewer: What’s the secret of a really good sales presentation?
Sue Leeson: Firstly, having a product that you can easily demonstrate and a product that has a good story behind it. Secondly, that the person who’s actually giving the sales presentation can engage with their audience in a credible fashion, can tell the story very clearly and can demonstrate the features and benefits of each product in a very clear and easy-to-understand way.
Interviewer: Can you give us an example of how you develop a sales pitch?
Sue Leeson: First of all, it’s all in the preparation, so it’s all about knowing the product inside and out, what the product can do, what it can’t do, when it is suitable, when the product isn’t suitable, and then be able to demonstrate the product to its best advantage in a very clear and precise fashion, but also in an engaging way.
Interviewer: What was QVC’s most successful product sale, and why?
Sue Leeson: We have many successful product areas. One of our strongest is beauty. Beauty works so well on TV for two reasons. First of all, each beauty brand has a fantastic story behind it, and we can really bring life to the brand and to the product presentation through telling that story in a very engaging way. And, secondly, each product is very easy to demonstrate. So if it’s a skin care product, like a moisturiser, we can show how to apply it, how much to apply in order to give the best effects. Finally, we add another layer to our sales presentation in that we may invite the expert behind that product to tell the story.
Interviewer: Are some types of product easier to sell than others?
Sue Leeson: Yes, and in fact some products are very difficult to sell on our business model. So take fragrance, for example. Clearly the main, er, piece you want to communicate with a fragrance is how it smells, and that can be very challenging to do through a television environment.
Interviewer: How has online shopping altered the way you sell?
Sue Leeson: It’s given us a fantastic opportunity to sell in a different way to our consumers. So if a customer wants to buy a skin care product at 10 o’clock at night, and perhaps on air we’re showing a gardening item, she can now go down to our website, she can browse through the range of products online that suit her at that moment in time, she can see an image of the product, she can see the product description, she can see what other customers think about the product through our ratings and review service, and as well she can see the video demonstration. So it opens up our range of 15,000 products to the customer at any time, day or night.


Complete each sentence with one word. The number of letters in the necessary word is shown in brackets at the end of sentences


Listen to part one and complete the expressions


If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.



Complete these statements with the appropriate forms of verbs from part two


If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.



Listen to this extract from part three and replace the eight mistakes in the transcript below with what Sue Leeson actually says


If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.


Listen to part four and find words that mean the following


If you can’t understand the audio after the second listening, you can open its tapescript by this link and listen to it once more.


Read this article from the Financial Times and do the task below


Amazon goes to Hollywood with film deal

Joshua Chaffin and Jonathan Birchall

Amazon, the largest online retailer, is going to Hollywood after striking its first deal for the film rights to a best-selling novel.

It is expected to team up with a Hollywood studio and producer after it acquired the screen rights to The Stolen Child, a fantasy tale by first-time author Keith Donohue. As part of the agreement, Amazon pledged that it would market the film and its subsequent DVD on its website.

The deal comes during speculation that Amazon is poised to broaden its film ambitions by introducing a new video download service in conjunction with major Hollywood studios.

Amazon said it did not intend to co-finance the film, but that the company’s brand, retail expertise, and customers around the world could make it «an extremely valuable partner in the marketing and distribution of this film».

Amazon has this year increased its involvement in video programming on its site, launching a weekly interview programme with artists and authors. In 2004, the company also produced five short live-action films on its website, featuring famous actors, which it used to promote its credit card and the range of goods available on its US site.

Another asset Amazon could bring to the film-making process is the consumer research compiled by its website. Based on its sales data, for example, Amazon would be well positioned to target the film at customers who have read the book and others like it, or bought similar DVDs from the site.

The deal also reflects the growing presence of non-traditional producers in Hollywood.


Match the words and expressions with their meanings

Read the text again and decide if the sentences are True or False

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Amazon goes to Hollywood with film deal

Joshua Chaffin and Jonathan Birchall

Amazon, the largest online retailer, is going to Hollywood after striking its first deal for the film rights to a best-selling novel.

It is expected to team up with a Hollywood studio and producer after it acquired the screen rights to The Stolen Child, a fantasy tale by first-time author Keith Donohue. As part of the agreement, Amazon pledged that it would market the film and its subsequent DVD on its website.

The deal comes during speculation that Amazon is poised to broaden its film ambitions by introducing a new video download service in conjunction with major Hollywood studios.

Amazon said it did not intend to co-finance the film, but that the company’s brand, retail expertise, and customers around the world could make it «an extremely valuable partner in the marketing and distribution of this film».

Amazon has this year increased its involvement in video programming on its site, launching a weekly interview programme with artists and authors. In 2004, the company also produced five short live-action films on its website, featuring famous actors, which it used to promote its credit card and the range of goods available on its US site.

Another asset Amazon could bring to the film-making process is the consumer research compiled by its website. Based on its sales data, for example, Amazon would be well positioned to target the film at customers who have read the book and others like it, or bought similar DVDs from the site.

The deal also reflects the growing presence of non-traditional producers in Hollywood.


Complete the different forms of these words from the article. The first has been done for you

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Read Ya Ling’s e-mail and the words

Dear Rik & Sandra,

Many thanks for your latest mail and your useful ideas about our investment options.

Our investment plan will certainly be the main focus of our next meeting, which is scheduled for 14th June.

I’m attaching the draft agenda here for your information. If there are any points you’d like to add, please let me know.

Looking forward to seeing you both on 14th June.

Best wishes,
Ya Ling


Useful phrases

  • to reach sales targets
  • to maximize profits

Wordlist

  1. achieve
  2. sale
  3. item on the agenda
  4. increase
  5. make a profit
  6. expand
  7. important
  8. forthcoming

Write Rik’s reply to Ya Ling’s e-mail. In addition, suggest that setting up online sales should be on the agenda and say why

Instructions

1. Read the task and study the sample carefully.
2. Plan what you are going to write about.
3. Write according to your plan.
4. Check your writing before sending it for evaluation.
5. Learn the rules and see the sample here.
6. Please use Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.


Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Shopping
  • Making sales
  • Buying items
  • Selling on TV
  • Second part
  • Third part
  • The interview
  • Selling
  • QVC
  • Find mistakes
  • Film deals online
  • Amazon deals
  • E-mails
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing