Business|Adults|Pre-Int|14. Selling overseas

Read the quote and give your opinion about it


«In modern economy exporting isn’t just for big companies, especially now that the Internet has made it easy to reach customers around the globe.»

— Randy Myers, a former reporter for The Wall Street Journal


Choose the appropriate topic and answer the questions

1. What is it that you sell?

2. What sort of things should you think about if you want to sell your product abroad?

3. What decisions do you have to make?

4. How do you deal with:

a) shipping costs;

b) currency conversion;

c) distribution;

d) taxes and duties;

e) marketing;

f) labeling and packaging requirements;

g) customs clearance?

1. Does your company purchase anything overseas?

2. Do you think your company will ever start selling abroad? Why / Why not?

3. What challenges can you think of for the companies considering shipping internationally:

a) shipping costs;

b) currency conversion;

c) distribution;

d) taxes and duties;

e) marketing;

f) labeling and packaging requirements;

g) customs clearance?

Answer the questions


1. What famous products are exported from your country?

2. Is your country’s production popular overseas?

3. Does your country produce anything which you think would not be sold well overseas? Why not?


Order the endings of the sentences so that they match the beginnings. Then give your opinion on each piece of advice about selling abroad

Read the exam tips

pic1_Adults|Grammar|Pre-Int|L14

Exam tip

Part 5: Multiple choice

This part tests candidates’ reading for gist and specific information.This part presents a single text accompanied by six multiple-choice comprehension questions.

The text is informative and is often taken from a leaflet or a newspaper or magazine article. Candidates are expected to employ more complex reading strategies in this task, in that they should demonstrate their ability:

  • to extract relevant information,
  • to read for gist and detail,
  • to scan the text for specific information,
  • and to understand the purpose of the writer and the audience for which the text is intended.

Choose the correct answer to the questions below

Read the following article


Thinking of selling your product abroad?

It can be a great way to expand your market, but you need to go into it with your eyes open. It needs careful research and a number of key decisions.

First of all, you need to carry out research into your target market to find out about local conditions. You shouldn’t assume that a product which is sold well at home will be sold well overseas. You may have to change it in some way (for example, the label or packaging) to suit the local culture. In another language your brand name may not sound good or be easy to say. The French soft drink Sic is an example of a product which would certainly have to change its name in English-speaking countries!

You also have to come up with an idea on how to organise your sales. Sometimes you may be able to sell directly to the consumer, over the Internet or at trade fairs. In general, however, you should look for a partner who already understands the local market. This may be a sales agent who will sell the product for you or a distributor who will buy your product and then sell it locally.

Another key decision is what mode of transport to use. Often there will be more than one, for example, you may need to send goods to a port by lorry and then overseas by ship. Your responsibility for transport depends on your agreement with your customer. You should have a written contract which says who is responsible for transport using «Incoterms» (the international trade terms for sales). Usually you must take responsibility for your country’s customs procedures, and your customers look after customs procedures in their country. A lot of paperwork is needed, so you should consider hiring a freight forwarding specialist, because then you don’t have to deal with customs procedures personally.

Intellectual property (IP) protection is another important issue. Patents and trademarks are only protected in their country of origin, so you will have to get trademark protection in every country where you would like to sell.

British and American terms

pic1|Business|Pre-Int|L14 pic2|Business|Pre-Int|L14
mode of transport means of transport
lorry truck


Choose the best answer to the questions according to the article

Read the definition of a phrasal verb. Then match phrasal verbs from the article you’ve just read to their meanings

pic3|Business|Pre-Int|L14

A phrasal verb is an idiomatic phrase consisting of a verb and another element, typically either the adverb, as in break down, or the preposition, for example see to.


Complete sentences with a suitable phrasal verb. Pay attention to the tense (Present Simple, Present Continuous or Past Simple) and modify the verb

Watch the video trying to catch as much information as you can. Then answer the questions

The organisation of a trade fair begins with the renting of the exhibition centre in the town where the fair will take place. Once the organisers know the number of square metres available to them, they can canvass for clients to hire stands during the fair.

The multinationals book the largest stands because they’ve got more clients to see. The smaller companies only take up a few square metres.

Before a trade fair, every company must prepare the sales documents that it wishes to show to potential customers. Typing mistakes or bad colour reproduction would immediately make a bad impression.

The trade fair is taking place in Jakarta, in Indonesia. The sales representatives have to collect their passes from the reception desk. Some sales reps have already begun their demonstrations, trying to highlight the products and services their company is offering.

Even if they’re representing different companies, the sales reps all do the same job. A trade fair is a succession of appointments, meetings and demonstrations. There’s no let-up! For this man, the day begins at nine o’clock with the representative of an Australian distributor.

It continues at ten with a potential client keen to clinch a distribution agreement. Another appointment has been arranged for eleven. The sales reps get used to the jet lag quickly but never to the fatigue of a trade fair’s first day!

They are exhausted from their toing and froing and from repeating the same thing a thousand times.

There’s no rest at lunchtime either for this rep who’s invited his clients to a restaurant to discuss business. It’s often here that the foundations for new contracts are laid. What a pity to have travelled so many miles and not be able to visit the country!

The mobile phone is an essential tool at a trade fair. But it can be annoying when your colleagues on the other side of the world call at two in the morning, because they’ve forgotten about the time difference!

Come the evening, the sales rep meets his clients for dinner. The evening begins in the restaurant with a bottle of champagne. Everyone’s satisfied because the terms of the freshly signed contract prove advantageous for both parties.

Once the trade fair’s over, the entire sales team returns to the company headquarters. The сhairman is delighted to learn that the products have won prizes, and that numerous contracts have been signed.


  1. What can you do at a trade fair?
  2. What does the required square metres depend on?
  3. What should companies prepare before the trade fair?
  4. What does a sales representative have to do at a fair trade?
  5. Can you describe a sales representative routine at a trade fair? Do they suffer from anything?
  6. Do sales representatives have a chance to explore the city?
  7. What’s an essential tool at a trade fair?
  8. What happens after contracts are signed at the trade fair?

This time listen to the audio and complete the missing information

pic4|Business|Pre-Int|L14

The organisation of a trade fair begins with the renting of the exhibition centre in the town where the fair will take place. Once the organisers know the number of square metres available to them, they can canvass for clients to hire stands during the fair.

The multinationals book the largest stands because they’ve got more clients to see. The smaller companies only take up a few square metres.

Before a trade fair, every company must prepare the sales documents that it wishes to show to potential customers. Typing mistakes or bad colour reproduction would immediately make a bad impression.

The trade fair is taking place in Jakarta, in Indonesia. The sales representatives have to collect their passes from the reception desk. Some sales reps have already begun their demonstrations, trying to highlight the products and services their company is offering.

Even if they’re representing different companies, the sales reps all do the same job. A trade fair is a succession of appointments, meetings and demonstrations. There’s no let-up! For this man, the day begins at nine o’clock with the representative of an Australian distributor.

It continues at ten with a potential client keen to clinch a distribution agreement. Another appointment has been arranged for eleven. The sales reps get used to the jet lag quickly but never to the fatigue of a trade fair’s first day!

They are exhausted from their toing and froing and from repeating the same thing a thousand times.

There’s no rest at lunchtime either for this rep who’s invited his clients to a restaurant to discuss business. It’s often here that the foundations for new contracts are laid. What a pity to have travelled so many miles and not be able to visit the country!

The mobile phone is an essential tool at a trade fair. But it can be annoying when your colleagues on the other side of the world call at two in the morning, because they’ve forgotten about the time difference!

Come the evening, the sales rep meets his clients for dinner. The evening begins in the restaurant with a bottle of champagne. Everyone’s satisfied because the terms of the freshly signed contract prove advantageous for both parties.

Once the trade fair’s over, the entire sales team returns to the company headquarters. The сhairman is delighted to learn that the products have won prizes, and that numerous contracts have been signed.



Match the idioms to their meaning

pic7|Business|Pre-Int|L5

Give some advice to the companies planning to export their goods concerning the following:

  • advertising and marketing;
  • sales channels;
  • customs regulations;
  • transport;
  • preventing people from copying their product.

Useful language

  • You should / shouldn’t …
  • You have to / don’t have to …
  • You must / mustn’t …

pic5|Business|Pre-Int|L14

Choose the correct option for each sentence

pic1|Business|Pre-Int|L9

Listen to the entrepreneur describing five important steps of setting up a new business. Complete the table below with short phrases

Well, the first step, of course, is to develop a new product idea. Many people decide to start a business, because they have a good idea.
But you have to remember that about 80% of new business ideas fail. Usually it’s because people don’t understand the market.
So, the second step is to conduct market research. Your research should answer two key questions. First, is there a demand for your product or service? Second, who are your competitors?
When you know you have a market, the next step is to prepare a good business plan. Your business plan helps you to focus on what you want to do. It also helps with the fourth step – getting finance.
You have to decide what type of business you want to have, your goals, your product or service and its key selling points. In the plan, you also need to show that you can run the business. So you include information about staff, management, production, marketing and, of course, finance. This shows that you know how to run a business.
But the most important step is the fifth one – to build a customer base. You need a number of regular customers who come back to you year after year. A strong customer base is key to making a success of your business.

Read the part of a letter below from Ms Chong, inviting you to a trade fair her company is organizing

pic3|Business|Pre-Int|L8

We would like to invite you to take part in and give a presentation at our trade fair for companies having business with Asian countries. The dates are 14 and 15 November. We would be grateful if you could talk for about ten minutes on why partnership with Asian countries is an exciting opportunity to expand your business. A summary of your presentation would also be very useful. Please, advise us if you are able to accept this invitation as well as which size of stands you need.


Write a letter to Ms Chong

  • thanking her for her invitation;
  • saying which of the two dates you would prefer;
  • giving a brief summary of your presentation;
  • enquiring about largest stands.

Write 60-80 words. Do not include any postal addresses


Instructions

  1. Read the situation and instructions carefully.
  2. Plan what you are going to write about.
  3. Write the text according to your plan.
  4. Check your writing before sending it for evaluation.
  5. Learn the rules and see the sample 🔗here.
  6. Please use 🔗Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.

Sample answer

Dear Ms Chong,

I really appreciate your invitation to the trade fair.
I would be happy to take part in it on November 14. My presentation will consist of three parts. I will tell participants of the trade fair why, when and how to start exporting to Asian market successfully and risks free.
We would also like to have largest stands in the centre of the room, if possible.

Yours faithfully,
(name)


Useful language

  • Dear (name),
  • Thank you for …
  • I really appreciate your …
  • I would prefer …
  • My presentation will consist of …
  • Yours sincerely,
  • Yours faithfully,

Read the task and prepare your two-minute speech on the topic «Brand names in different countries»


Follow the link, scroll through the pictures in the presentation and read the article.

🔗»Brands which are distributed to countries under different names»


In your speech, mention the following:

1. Why are the same products distributed under different names? Explain these reasons and give your own ones:

a) cultural difference;

b) strange spelling;

c) different meanings due to loss in translation.

2. What examples of different brand names can you give?

3. Do you think to distribute the products under different names is right or wrong?


Allow your browser the access to the microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Some advice on exporting
  • Exam tip Reading Part 5
  • International trade
  • Phrasal verbs workshop
  • Trade fair
  • Being a sales rep
  • Speaking
  • What should you do?
  • Setting up a new business
  • Asian trade fair
  • Speak up your mind