Business|Adults|Pre-Int|2. Career moves

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Answer the questions

1. What stages are there in a typical career?

2. Is career important to you?

Read the quotation

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«Many people quit looking for work when they find a job.»

— Steven Wright, US comedian


Discuss these questions

1. How ambitious are you?

2. Do you have a career plan? Where do you want to be in 10 years’ time?

3. Which of the following would you prefer to do?

a) work for one company during your career

b) work for several different companies

c) work for yourself

Look at these activities. Match each activity to its corresponding area of work

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What should you do to get ahead in your career? Choose four most important tips from this list

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These phrases all include the word career. Match each of them to its correct meaning

Listen to three people talking about their careers. Answer the question

Pronunciation

 


Speaker 1

Well, for a long time, I think I was very ambitious — you know, wanting to get to the top and to earn as much money as possible. But then I decided that other things are more important. I recently decided to take a career break, so I’m travelling for a year and doing some unpaid work. I want to see something of the world and look at my options. Everyone at work says it’s not a very good career move, but it’s what I want to do. All my friends think I’m mad, but I think I have time. I’m only in my thirties, after all.

Speaker 2

It’s been very difficult, l think — to get a start without much experience, you know. It’s the chicken-and-egg situation — you can’t get a job without experience, and you can’t get experience without a job. The career opportunities everybody talks about are not really happening for me. Maybe the problem is that I don’t really have a career path in mind. I’m still not really sure what I want to do in the long term. I’ve done different things, but they don’t seem to lead anywhere. I don’t really know where I’m going. Studying at university made a lot of sense at the time, but now I’m not so sure. l don’t feel very prepared for my working life.

Speaker 3

Well, I suppose I always had a career plan, and for me, it seems to have been successful. I first worked for the company part time when I was a student, part of a work placement, which I organised myself. I always wanted to work in this area and only really for one company. They offered me a full-time job, and then I worked my way up the career ladder from trader to associate to manager to director. I’m now a partner. Maybe it’s a bit unusual these days to only work for one company, but for me it’s all I wanted. It’s only been 17 years, but I’m going to take early retirement next year and buy a boat.


Listen again. Which of the phrases with career does each speaker use?

Which of these experiences are common in your country?

Speaker 1

Well, for a long time, I think I was very ambitious — you know, wanting to get to the top and to earn as much money as possible. But then I decided that other things are more important. I recently decided to take a career break, so I’m travelling for a year and doing some unpaid work. I want to see something of the world and look at my options. Everyone at work says it’s not a very good career move, but it’s what I want to do. All my friends think I’m mad, but I think I have time. I’m only in my thirties, after all.

Speaker 2

It’s been very difficult, l think — to get a start without much experience, you know. It’s the chicken-and-egg situation — you can’t get a job without experience, and you can’t get experience without a job. The career opportunities everybody talks about are not really happening for me. Maybe the problem is that I don’t really have a career path in mind. I’m still not really sure what I want to do in the long term. I’ve done different things, but they don’t seem to lead anywhere. I don’t really know where I’m going. Studying at university made a lot of sense at the time, but now I’m not so sure. l don’t feel very prepared for my working life.

Speaker 3

Well, I suppose I always had a career plan, and for me, it seems to have been successful. I first worked for the company part time when I was a student, part of a work placement, which I organised myself. I always wanted to work in this area and only really for one company. They offered me a full-time job, and then I worked my way up the career ladder from trader to associate to manager to director. I’m now a partner. Maybe it’s a bit unusual these days to only work for one company, but for me it’s all I wanted. It’s only been 17 years, but I’m going to take early retirement next year and buy a boat.

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Complete the sentences below with the verbs from the box

Look at these groups of words. Click on the noun or noun phrase in each group which doesn’t go with the verb in italics

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Complete each of these sentences with the appropriate form of a word partnership from the box

Scan the article below quickly and answer these questions

🔹Facebook profile — the information about yourself that you share on Facebook;
🔹online image — your ‘personality’ on the Internet as shown by pictures of you, comments you write, and so on;
🔹online reputation — the opinion people have of you because of what they see on the Internet;
🔹faux pas — (from French) an embarrassing mistake;
🔹personal brand — the image you want people to have of you.


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  1. What percentage of employers research candidates online?
  2. Which social-networking sites are mentioned?
  3. Who do Peter Cullen and Farhan Yasin work for?

Be aware of your online image

Jobseekers have been warned that their Facebook profile could damage their employment prospects, after a study found that seven in ten employers now research candidates online.

According to new figures released by Microsoft, checks on Facebook and Twitter are now as important in the job-selection process as a CV or interview.

The survey, which questioned human-resource managers at the top 100 companies in the UK, the US, Germany and France, found that 70 per cent admitted to rejecting a candidate because of their online behaviour.

But HR bosses also said that a strong image online could actually help job hunters to land their dream job. Peter Cullen, of Microsoft, said: «Your online reputation is not something to be scared of, it’s something to be proactively managed. These days, it’s essential that web users cultivate the kind of online reputation that they would want an employer to see.» Facebook faux pas include drunken photographs, bad language and messages complaining about work.

Farhan Yasin of online recruitment network Careerbuilder.co.uk said: «Social networking is a great way to make connections with job opportunities and promote your personal brand across the Internet. People really need to make sure they are using this resource to their advantage, by conveying a professional image.» But Mr Yasin cautioned job seekers to be aware of their online image, even after landing the perfect job, after their own research found that 28 per cent of employers had fired staff for content found on their social-networking profile. He added, «A huge number of employers have taken action against staff for writing negative comments about the company or another employee on their social-networking page.»


Listen to the article and choose the best headline

Listen to the audio and do the exercise.

Be aware of your online image

Jobseekers have been warned that their Facebook profile could damage their employment prospects after a study found that seven in ten employers now research candidates online. According to new figures released by Microsoft, checks on Facebook and Twitter are now as important in the job-selection process as a CV or interview. The survey, which questioned human-resource managers at the top 100 companies in the UK, the US, Germany and France, found that 70 per cent admitted to rejecting a candidate because of their online behaviour. But HR bosses also said that a strong image online could actually help job hunters to land their dream job. Peter Cullen, of Microsoft, said: «Your online reputation is not something to be scared of, it’s something to be proactively managed. These days, it’s essential that web users cultivate the kind of online reputation that they would want an employer to see.» Facebook faux pas include drunken photographs, bad language and messages complaining about work. Farhan Yasin, of online recruitment network Careerbuilder.co.uk. said: «Social networking is a great way to make connections with job opportunities and promote your personal brand across the Internet. People really need to make sure they are using this resource to their advantage, by conveying a professional image.» But Mr Yasin cautioned job seekers to be aware of their online image, even after landing the perfect job, after their own research found that 28 per cent of employers had fired staff for content found on their social-networking profile. He added, «A huge number of employers have taken action against staff for writing negative comments about the company or another employee on their social-networking page.»


Choose the best word to complete each space in the advert

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Open the presentation and do the task

Read this article from the Financial Times. Do the task below

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It’s time to sack job appraisals

By Lucy Kellaway

Last week an e-mail went round the office asking for suggestions on ways to improve our performance appraisal system. My suggestion is dead easy and dirt cheap: get rid of the whole thing and replace it with nothing at all.

Over the past 30 years, I have been appraised 30 times — as a banker, a journalist and a non-executive director. I’ve lived through the fashion for long, complicated forms. I’ve also survived the fashion in which appraisals are called «career chats». I’ve done appraisals across a table, on a sofa, even over a meal.

But I have never learnt anything about myself as a result. I have never set any target that I later hit. Instead, I always feel as if I am playing a particularly bad party game that isn’t fun and that doesn’t answer the most basic question: am I doing a good job? The resulting form is then put on file even though you know from experience how much attention will be paid to it later: none at all.

At least I’ve only had to suffer one side of the process. I have never — thank goodness — had to appraise anyone else. This must be even worse, as you have to perform the same operation with each employee in turn. You have to let people believe they are doing more or less okay, because it’s too tiring to tell them that they aren’t doing okay at all.


Complete the table with the words from paragraphs 1, 2 and 3


Now match the nouns to their definitions


Choose the correct alternative to complete these statements about the expressions in italic from paragraphs 1 and 2

Read this article from the Financial Times. Choose the right question for each paragraph

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Who mentioned these facts?

Read the text

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Ten ways to improve your career

Ajilon Finance, a leading staffing and recruiting services firm, offers the following tips for getting ahead in your career.

«You’re in line for a promotion. Unfortunately, the line is six miles long.»

1. Make a list of your priorities and outline your tasks for the day. Write down your short- and long-term goals, evaluate your progress frequently and stay focused.

2. Are you really present? You may physically be at work, but are you there mentally?

3. Learn how to work through others. Delegating tasks is an important skill to master at any level.

4. Always look for opportunities to broaden your skills. For example, you can attend professional development seminars.

5. Socialise with colleagues. This will help you learn about what’s happening in other departments.

6. Create your own goals. Determine where you want to be professionally and what skills you need to reach that goal.

7. Be comfortable with being uncomfortable. Accept challenges that force you to try something new.

8. Be clear about what you want. If you believe you deserve a promotion, ask for one.

9. Take time off and relax. Attending to your personal life and doing things that make you happy will help your performance at work.

10. Seek satisfaction. If you’re disappointed by your current career, look for ways to transform your job into more of what you want. If this does not solve the problem, maybe it’s time to look for a new position.

«If you follow this advice, you will significantly increase your opportunities to earn more money, get promoted sooner and move ahead faster,» says Mr Lebovits, President and Chief Operating Officer of Ajilon Finance.


Listen to people discussing the article. Which tips do Debbie and Nikola consider the most useful? Choose tips from 1 to 10 in the order they discuss them

Nikola: Mm. Lots of helpful advice here … Debbie? … What do you think?
Debbie: Um, just a sec … Right … Well, I’d say the most useful tip from this list was the one about creating your own goals. I’ve always believed that if you don’t know where you want to go, well, you’ll never get anywhere …
Nikola: … you’ll be stuck.
Debbie: Exactly. Stuck in the same old job for the rest of your life! Right. Next, «be comfortable with being uncomf …» Oh, sorry, no. That’s my third point, actually. What I’ve chosen is ‘make a list of your priorities …
Nikola: … and outline your tasks for the day’?
Debbie: Yep. That’s the one. It’s logical, isn’t it? First you need to set your objectives, and once you’ve done that, you need to prioritise them. And if you want to move ahead in your career, you also need to evaluate your progress regularly, as it says here. If you do that, you get a better idea of what you’re good at, and also of the areas that you need to work on.
Nikola: It’s all connected with feedback, isn’t it? Mm … And what’s your last point then?
Debbie: Well, as I said a minute ago, «be comfortable with being uncomfortable».
Nikola: Mm. I wasn’t too sure how to interpret that one …
Debbie: Well, my understanding of this is that when a challenge presents itself, you have to take it on. I mean, if you play it safe all the time, if you just settle into a routine, you’ll never move ahead in your career.
Nikola: That reminds me of a quote I read recently.
Debbie: Yeah?
Nikola: It said «If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll only get what you’ve already got.»
Debbie: Mm, I really like that. It’s so true, isn’t it? You can’t make progress if you don’t take risks, sometimes. Now, Nik, your turn. Which of these ten tips do you think are the most useful?
Nikola: Hard to believe, but my first one is the same as yours!
Debbie: Really! That’s so interesting … A meeting of minds!
Nikola: For me, this was the easiest to decide on. I believe that once you’ve established your own goals, in many ways all the rest follows. Anyway, the second piece of advice I chose is «always look for opportunities to broaden your skills». Some companies — like mine, for instance — look after their employees’ professional development really well, but others don’t, and in that case it’s your personal responsibility to look for suitable opportunities. And finally, my third point was «Are you really present?», because I believe it’s crucial to be 100% focused on whatever task you’re engaged in. But now, after talking with you, I think I’d like to change it. I like what you said about being uncomfortable. We really have to try something new. If we don’t, we’ll never grow professionally or even personally.
Debbie: So, if we compare our final ranking, our number one and number three are the same. We just differ on the second point.
Nikola: That’s right, yes. Mm. I quite enjoyed discussing this article with you …

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Listen to these extracts from the discussion and complete them

Debbie: … if you want to move ahead in your career, you also need to evaluate your progress regularly … If you do that, you get a better idea of what you’re good at, and also of the areas that you need to work on.
… when a challenge presents itself, you have to take it on … if you play it safe all the time, if you just settle into a routine, you’ll never move ahead in your career.
Nikola: If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll only get what you’ve already got.

Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Careers
  • Areas of work
  • Career moves
  • Career paths
  • What's the verb?
  • Career collocations
  • Be aware of your online image
  • Lambrois 303
  • Performance reviews
  • Overseas experience
  • 10 ways to improve your career
  • Improving your career