Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people

Warm-up


What are the ways of getting a job?

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Read the quotation, explain it and say if you agree or disagree with this idea

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«One machine can do the work of 50 ordinary men. No machine can do the work of one extraordinary man.»

— Elbert Hubbard, American writer

Important factors


Which factors below are important for getting a job?
Choose five most important

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1/appearance

2/hobbies/interests

3/experience

4/personality

5/intelligence

6/marital status

7/contacts/connections

8/qualifications

9/references

10/age/gender

11/astrological sign

12/handwriting

13/blood group

14/sickness record

15/family background

16/education


Answer the questions


1. What was your best/worst job?
2. Have you had many job interviews? Which one was the most stressful?
3. What was the most interesting interview question?
4. Who was your best/worst boss? Why?
5. Who was your most helpful colleague?

People at work


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Discuss the statements


1. At work, appearance is more important than performance.

2. You should keep your private life totally separate from your work.

3. People don’t change much during their working lives.

4. It is best to work for as few companies as possible.

5. It doesn’t matter whether you enjoy your job or not as long as it’s a well-paid job.

6. It is impossible to have a successful career and a happy family life. You have to choose one or the other.

7. Qualifications are more important today than ever before.

8. Everybody should retire at 50.

Words and phrases


Match the captions to the photos


Complete the parts with the correct words

Recruitment words


Match the words and the definitions


Complete the sentences

Recruitment procedure

Recruitment procedure is designed to help the recruiter togo through the standard hiring process and ensure that the key aspects of the recruitment have been addressed.


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Complete the recruitment checklist below by adding these verbs:

Looking for a job

curriculum vitae [kəˌrɪkjʊləm|ˈvaɪtiː,-kəˌrɪkjʊləmˈviːtaɪ]

resume [ˈrɛzjuːmeɪ]

psychometric [ˌsaɪkəʊˈmɛtrɪk]


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Consultant’s talk


Match the verbs with the nouns to make word partnership

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Listen to a consultant talking about the recruitment process and answer the questions

Well, what usually happens is that an employer will advertise a vacancy or new post — sometimes both inside and outside the company. Then, after they have received all the applications, they will screen them — go through and shortlist the candidates for interview — choosing those who appear to meet the criteria for the job. Next, they will assemble an interview panel, which is perhaps as many as four or five people in some cases, and then call the candidates to interview. Some employers choose to check references at this stage to avoid delays later, while others wait until after the interview when they have chosen one of the candidates. Provided the panel is happy, the employer will make a job offer, and the successful candidate starts work. Often he or she will attend induction sessions or be given a mentor who helps to train new staff.

1. Where is a new post normally advertised?
2. What candidates are invited to the interview?
3. What is an interview panel ?
4. Are the references checked before or after the interview?
5. Is training obligatory for new employees?

Suitable people


Look at the different types of people.
Which do you think are the most desirable for companies to employ?

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Match the adjectives to the descriptions above

The ideal employee


Listen and repeat the adjectives. Pay attention to the stress


enthusiastic
adaptable
methodical
reliable
ambitious
objective
creative
analytical
authoritative
practical

a) enthusiastic
b) adaptable
c) methodical
d) reliable
e) ambitious
f) objective
g) creative
h) analytical
i) authoritative
j) practical


Answer the questions


1. Which of these adjectives describe you?
2. Which of the different types of people have you worked or studied with?
3. Which of the different types of people do you think are easy or difficult to work with?

Looking for a job


Complete the sentences with the words and phrases



Cross out the verb which does not normally go with the given noun

1. an interview — to call / for to hold / to apply / to carry out


2. a post — to shortlist / to take up / to advertise / to appoint somebody to

Answer: to shortlist

3. applicants — to interview / to advertise / to reject / to shortlist

Answer: to advertise

4. one’s CV — to fill up / to update / to submit / to send

Answer: to fill up

5. a contract — to sign / to enter into / to terminate / to work

Answer: to work

6. a salary — to earn / to pay / to receive / to submit

Answer: to submit

Getting a job: stages


Match the following recruitment terms with their definitions



Marcus Westerberg is a programmer with five years’ experience of working for an international bank. He has decided to look for a new job. Put the following stages from his job-hunting process into the correct order

Finding the right people


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The text below is about methods of recruiting new staff. Read the text and choose the best sentence from the list to fill each of the gaps. One of the sentences is extra


1. In contrast, a newspaper might charge the same price, or more, to run a job advertisement for only one or two days.

2. Many firms are still happy to recruit junior personnel themselves, but some companies find this too time-consuming.

3. Ninety per cent of companies in the industries we deal with now recruit externally as they cannot access the staff they need without outside help.

4. Now we are regularly asked to recruit middle-managers.

5. The largest ones also offer companies extra services, such as access to their databases of CVs.

6. This is particularly true of companies which need specialist or technical staff.

7. The most successful of these sites allow candidates to submit their CVs either by filling out an on-line form or by pasting an existing electronic CV file into the form.


Recruitment methods

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The company website

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Job posting on headhunting websites

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Recruitment agency

Complete the table with the advantages and disadvantages of each recruitment method. Then check yourself

difficult to design / informs potential employees about the company / applications and CVs still have to be processed / expensive / all the paperwork os dealt with / experts in finding the right people / very cost-effective / applications can be kept for future reference

 

Recruitment methods

Advantages for employers

The company website
informs potential employees about the company
|
applications can be kept for future references
Headhunting websites
very cost-effective
Recruitment agencies
experts in finding the right people
|
all the paperwork is dealt with

Recruitment methods

Disadvantages for employers

The company website
difficult to design
Headhunting websites
applications and Cvs still have to be processed
Recruitment agencies
expensive

Executive search


Dr Simon Kingston works for the international executive search consultants Heidrick & Struggles. Listen to the first part of the interview and complete the chart. Then check yourself

Interviewer: How do you identify and attract the best candidates for a particular job?
Dr Simon Kingston: Well, the most important thing for us at the beginning is to have clear and full briefing from our clients. So we spend a great deal of time talking to a range of people in the client organisation. And then, according to the sort of job that we are seeking to fill, we will use three different sorts of method for identifying candidates. One, the most obvious one, is advertisement in appropriate newspapers or journals. The second is by asking for nominations from within our client organisation of appropriate candidates. And the third, and most labour intensive for us, is our own, original research. And that will be derived from our database, from talking to authoritative sources in the relevant market place, and then from beginning to map the business sector in which we think we are most likely to find good candidates. All three of those different methods of identifying candidates will cross-reference, and ideally we’d like to find candidates who’re sourced from each of the three areas. And sometimes, when we’re very fortunate, we will find an individual who comes referred from each of the three approaches. In respect of our own research, it’s always very valuable for us to be able to speak, at the beginning of a search, to experts in a given sector, perhaps people from the media, commentators, sometimes academics who have wide networks of their own, that are independent from any single client organisation but span a broad cross-section of companies and organisations. And on those occasions, frequently those people will have access to, may have met, rising stars in a given sector, and can offer us an autonomous, an independent view of the skills and abilities of some of those people. And furthermore they may frequently have ideas on the interests and likely level of availability of people. So that when we make an approach to someone we haven’t spoken to before, we do it in an informed way.

nominations / research / journals / referencing / authoritative sources / sector / map / database / Advertising



Listen again and answer the question

Interviewer: How do you identify and attract the best candidates for a particular job?
Dr Simon Kingston: Well, the most important thing for us at the beginning is to have clear and full briefing from our clients. So we spend a great deal of time talking to a range of people in the client organisation. And then, according to the sort of job that we are seeking to fill, we will use three different sorts of method for identifying candidates. One, the most obvious one, is advertisement in appropriate newspapers or journals. The second is by asking for nominations from within our client organisation of appropriate candidates. And the third, and most labour intensive for us, is our own, original research. And that will be derived from our database, from talking to authoritative sources in the relevant market place, and then from beginning to map the business sector in which we think we are most likely to find good candidates. All three of those different methods of identifying candidates will cross-reference, and ideally we’d like to find candidates who’re sourced from each of the three areas. And sometimes, when we’re very fortunate, we will find an individual who comes referred from each of the three approaches. In respect of our own research, it’s always very valuable for us to be able to speak, at the beginning of a search, to experts in a given sector, perhaps people from the media, commentators, sometimes academics who have wide networks of their own, that are independent from any single client organisation but span a broad cross-section of companies and organisations. And on those occasions, frequently those people will have access to, may have met, rising stars in a given sector, and can offer us an autonomous, an independent view of the skills and abilities of some of those people. And furthermore they may frequently have ideas on the interests and likely level of availability of people. So that when we make an approach to someone we haven’t spoken to before, we do it in an informed way.

Simon mentions three different types of experts which his company usually speaks to at the beginning of an executive search. Who are they?

a) cross-section analysts
b) people from the media
c) experts from the client organisation
d) commentators
e) professionals from particular spheres
f) academics

Answers: b, d, f

Advice to ambitious people


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Listen to the second part of the interview with Dr Simon Kingston and complete the summary below

Interviewer: What advice would you give to someone planning an ambitious business career?
Dr Simon Kingston: I think there isn’t one single pattern for success in a business career. But there are one or two things that are apparent and common themes in the careers of a lot of successful people. One of those is an honest understanding of the individual’s own strengths and weaknesses, and that allows them, I think, both to plan the sort of organisations in which they will work and which they are likely to succeed; but also, very importantly, allows them to react rapidly but appropriately to opportunities that are unplanned that present themselves. And I do think that’s something that distinguishes really successful people from those who are average in their professions. I do think one of the other characteristics that is apparent amongst very successful business leaders is a curiosity that even thirty years in the same sort of business doesn’t dilute or indeed destroy. At the very top of major organisations, people like Sir John Browne, now Lord Browne, at BP, demonstrates, even after a lifetime with a single company, which one might say has meant he has been engaged in a very similar sort of activity for the whole of his career — he demonstrates real interest in innovation and also an open-mindedness about the structure of the industry that he leads and how it ought to consider its role and indeed the very essence of what it does in the future. That ability to remain interested in the core essence of one’s business is, I think, something that distinguishes the successful. Many of the rest of us lesser mortals get bored very easily, or lose the ability to spot the interest and to sustain motivation and momentum on the strength of it.

Homework. Writing a CV


Read the example and the words


Traditional CV

The traditional CV, sometimes known as a chronological CV is used to match your qualifications and work experience with the requirements for the job role. The CV is structured in reverse chronological order, i.e. the most recent qualifications and experience are listed first.

This type of CV makes it easy for employers to identify potential candidates. This format allows you to provide clear details of your qualifications, work history and responsibilities which match the criteria provided in the job description.

It’s important to include:

🔹 dates — cover any gaps in your history;

🔹 qualifications and work experience — match these to the role you’re applying for;

🔹 additional skills and knowledge — cover essential criteria for the role.



Wordlist

1/qualification
2/experience
3/recognition
4/be responsible for
5/carry out
6/career goal
7/interest
8/personal details
9/achievement
10/confident in
11/experience

Write a short version of your CV/resume. Include only the key points

Instructions

1. Read the task and study the sample carefully.
2. Plan what you are going to write about.
3. Write according to your plan.
4. Check your writing before sending it for evaluation.
5. Learn the rules and see the sample here.
6. Please use Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.


Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Important factors
  • People at work
  • Words and phrases
  • Recruitment words
  • Recruitment procedure
  • Looking for a job
  • Consultant’s talk
  • Suitable people
  • The ideal employee
  • Looking for a job
  • Getting a job: stages
  • Finding the right people
  • Recruitment methods
  • Executive search
  • Advice to ambitious people
  • Writing a CV
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing