Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?

Explain the words

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1. Ethics

2. Ethical

3. Corporate social responsibility


Read the quotation and explain it in your own words

«Morality is largely a matter of geography.»

— Elbert Hubbard (1856-1915), American writer

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Discuss this list of unethical activities

1. Finding ways of paying as little tax as possible.

2. Using your work computer or phone for private purposes (e.g. online shopping).

3. Accepting praise for someone else’s ideas or work.

4. Selling something as genuine when you know it is not.

5. Using your influence to get jobs for friends or relatives (nepotism).

6. Phoning in sick at work when you are not ill.

7. Not telling the truth about your age or experience on an application form.

8. Not saying anything when you are charged too little for something by mistake.

9. Paying people in cash for jobs done around the home in order to reduce the cost.

10. Claiming extra expenses (e.g. getting a taxi receipt for more than the actual fare).


How ethical do you think these professions are? Order them accordingly. Put the most ethical first

Look at the situations. Which do you think are the most unethical?

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1. A new contact suggests that a payment into his private bank account will enable a company to win a valuable supply contract.

2. An employee informs some friends about a company takeover before it is generally known so they can buy shares and make a profit.

3. A company is making copies of luxury branded products and selling them in street markets.

4. An upmarket private airline only employs attractive women under 25 years old as cabin crew and ground staff.

5. An industrial company is disposing of waste chemicals in the sea.

6. A car manufacturer is secretly taking photos of a rival’s new model at a test track.

7. A cosmetics and pharmaceutical company tries out all its products on rats and mice.

8. Some criminals buy property and expensive cars with money they got from illegal activities. The goods are then sold and the now «clean» money is used in other businesses and new bank accounts.

9. A group of rival mobile phone companies get together and agree to charge approximately the same amount for a range of services and packages.

10. A company tells the authorities that it is making a lot less profit than it actually is.


Match the words to make word partnerships and guess which situation each of them describes

Read the text and find 7 words connected to dishonesty



The ethics of résumé writing

by Clinton D. Korver

It’s never OK to lie on a résumé. But what about stretching the truth?
How much can you «dress up» your résumé to make yourself as strong a candidate as possible without crossing the ethical line of deception? Consider a few conflicting thoughts:

Over 50% of people lie on their résumé.

A Monster.com blog about the dangers of lying on your résumé elicited 60 comments from job seekers recommending lying and only 46 discouraging it. Recommenders justified lying by claiming: everyone else is doing it, companies lie about job requirements, and it’s hard to get a good job.

Executives caught lying on their résumés often lose their jobs.

If you are reading this blog, you probably are not tempted by dishonesty. But what about the following:

🔹Claiming a degree that was not earned because you did most of the work and were only a few credits short.

🔹Creating a more impressive job title because you were already doing all of the work of that position.

🔹Claiming a team’s contributions as your own, because other members did not carry their weight.

🔹Inflating the number of people or range of functions for which you had direct responsibility because you really did have a great deal of influence over them.

These are called rationalizations — constructing a justification for a decision you suspect is really wrong. You create a story that sounds believable but doesn’t pass close examination. You begin to fool yourself. You develop habits of distorted thinking. So where is the line? You need to decide that for yourself. Here are some tests to keep your thinking clear:

🔹Other-shoe test: How would you feel if the shoe were on the other foot and you were the hiring manager looking at this resume? What assumptions would you draw and would they be accurate?

🔹Front-page test: Would you think the same way if the accomplishment in question were reported on the front page of the Wall Street Journal? Or your prior employer’s internal newsletter?

But wait, you say. My résumé doesn’t quite pass these tests, but there is something real underneath my claims, and I do not want to sell myself short. When in doubt, ask an old boss. While asking an old boss may be difficult, it has many benefits. Precisely because it is difficult, it forces you to think clearly and sometimes creatively. Asking also checks the accuracy of your claims, trains your old boss in how to represent you during reference checks, and sometimes your old boss may give you better ways to represent yourself.

from Business Week



Read the article again and answer the questions

  1. What reasons are given for not being totally honest on your CV?
  2. What can happen to senior managers who lie on their CVs?
  3. Which of the four rationalisations do you think is the most serious? Why?
  4. What happens to you when you start using rationalisations?
  5. What are the advantages of asking an old boss?

Read the examples and answer the questions

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We can use different tenses to narrate a story.

Past Simple The company fired her.
Past Continuous Everything was going really well.
Past Perfect She had lied on her CV.
Present Perfect Since then, I’ve advised everyone to be honest.


1. The Past Simple is common when we describe a sequence of events or tell a story in chronological order about events that happened in the past.

On Monday 3 December 1984, a poisonous cloud of gas escaped from a pesticide plant in Bhopal, India. Eye witnesses described a cloud in the shape of a mushroom which rose above the plant and then descended over the town.

2. We use the Past Perfect to situate an event that happened before another past event.

By the end of the week, 1,200 people had died and at least 10,000 had been affected very seriously.

3. The Present Perfect is used to describe past events of current significance.

A major problem for doctors in Bhopal was lack of information on how to treat the chemical’s effects. A pathologist said: «Why hasn’t Union Carbide come forward to tell us about the gas that has leaked and how to treat it? Is it not their moral duty? They have not come forward.»

4. We use the Past Continuous to describe unfinished events which were in progress around a particular past time.

By Monday 10 December, the death toll had risen to 2,000, and American lawyers representing Indian families were suing Union Carbide for $12.5 billion in compensation. Meanwhile, journalists were asking the company difficult questions about its safety procedures, and the share price was dropping sharply, as investors became worried about the billions of dollars of compensation that the company might have to pay.


Listen to the conversation again and note down the examples of each of these tenses

Man Woman

Man: There have been a number of cases of résumé dishonesty in the papers recently.
Woman: That’s right. And unfortunately, it happened to a really good friend of mine.
Man: Oh? What happened?
Woman: Well, she got a really good job — Head of Sales at a prestigious company. She was over the moon. Everything was going really well. She was getting on with all her sales staff, she was receiving strong performance reviews and she was exceeding all her sales targets. She was getting a bit of a reputation as a rising star. Then suddenly, after four years in the job, her company fired her.
Man: Was it her CV?
Woman: Yeah. She had lied on it. She had claimed she had a Master’s degree — and she had also made up a fictitious previous employer.
Man: Do you know why she had done it?
Woman: She said she had felt desperate because she had been unemployed for a few months.
Man: And how did they find out?
Woman: An HR initiative. It required employees to show all college transcripts. And they found out she didn’t have a Master’s degree after all. It wasn’t the lack of the degree that cost her her job. It was her dishonesty. Since then, I’ve advised everyone to be honest on their CV.


Complete this text with the correct tenses of the verbs

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Tell a story about any of these ideas

1. A significant news event you remember well.

2. An ethical problem you know about.

3. A memorable event in your life (good or bad).

4. An unusual or memorable experience while you were travelling abroad.

5. Your first or last day in a job or organisation.

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Complete the sentences with the given words


Read this article from the Financial Times


Japan goes after industrial spies

by Michiyo Nakamoto

The advanced manufacturing plant in Kameyama, where Sharp manufactures liquid crystal display (LCD) panels and TVs, sits in a remote mountain range, safely out of view of most prying eyes. But a mysterious car has been seen, once a month, outside the site that is home to the Japanese group’s closely guarded secrets of advanced LCD production. Although the sightings of the car are not evidence that a rival company has been in search of sensitive information, they are nevertheless a reminder of the challenges that Japanese high-technology companies face in protecting their most valuable trade secrets.

When it comes to industrial espionage, Japanese companies have long been better known as defendants in high-profile cases, such as the notorious incident in 1982 in which employees of Hitachi were accused of stealing intellectual property from IBM. Hitachi admitted theft in the criminal case and settled a civil suit. But increasingly, as new competitors emerge in industries they once dominated, Japanese companies are falling victim to industrial espionage that threatens to rob the country of a critical advantage over lower-cost rivals.

Last week, the Japanese government detained Takashi Okamoto, a Japanese scientist charged in the US with stealing genetic material on Alzheimer’s disease nearly three years ago. The case, which is the first time the US Economic Espionage Act has been used, has led to changes in Japanese domestic law as well. In response to growing alarm in the business community, the Japanese government enacted legislation this month to make it a criminal offence to leak corporate trade secrets.

«The flow of technology out of Japan is leading to a decline in competitiveness and in employment,» says Yoshinori Komiya, director of the intellectual property policy office at the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (Meti). «We believe that there is some technology that should be transferred, but what is happening now is that technology that top management does not want transferred is getting passed on,» he says.

The problem is a highly sensitive one for the Japanese government, but is attracting attention as Japan’s neighbours in Asia gain skills as manufacturers of high technology goods, forcing even the best Japanese companies onto the defensive. Consequently, intellectual property has become critical to Japanese companies in differentiating their products and keeping ahead of the competition.

«We are taking many measures to prevent technology leakage,» says Yukio Shotoku, executive vice-president of Matsushita. Rival Sony says, «We would certainly welcome a regulatory system to protect intellectual property in countries such as China and South Korea.»


What is the key message of the article? Choose the best alternative

Find the appropriate expressions in the article that mean the same as the verbs in italics


Last week, the Japanese government detained Takashi Okamoto, a Japanese scientist charged in the US with stealing genetic material on Alzheimer’s disease nearly three years ago. The case, which is the first time the US Economic Espionage Act has been used, has led to changes in Japanese domestic law as well. In response to growing alarm in the business community, the Japanese government enacted legislation this month to make it a criminal offence to leak corporate trade secrets.

«The flow of technology out of Japan is leading to a decline in competitiveness and in employment,» says Yoshinori Komiya, director of the intellectual property policy office at the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (Meti). «We believe that there is some technology that should be transferred, but what is happening now is that technology that top management does not want transferred is getting passed on,» he says.

The problem is a highly sensitive one for the Japanese government, but is attracting attention as Japan’s neighbours in Asia gain skills as manufacturers of high technology goods, forcing even the best Japanese companies onto the defensive. Consequently, intellectual property has become critical to Japanese companies in differentiating their products and keeping ahead of the competition.

«We are taking many measures to prevent technology leakage,» says Yukio Shotoku, executive vice-president of Matsushita. Rival Sony says, «We would certainly welcome a regulatory system to protect intellectual property in countries such as China and South Korea.»

Read the information and the words

Informational Memos

An informational memo is an in-house communication addressed to one or more individuals. The objective is to convey one or more pieces of information that relate specifically to the topic in the subject line. Besides the actual information, the scope of a memo must provide a reason for why the information in it is relevant to the reader.

  • Identify Your Reader
  • Establish Your Objective
  • Determine Your Scope
  • Organize Your Letter
  • Draft Your Memo
  • Close Your Memo
  • Review and Revise Memo

Crafston Solutions, Inc.

1100 N Central,

Rowlett, TX 75083

(972) 463 1549

Memo

To: Department Heads

From: Debora Lynn

Date: December 10,2006

Subject: Annual Bonus Leave for Employees with Outstanding Performance

Starting January 1, we will introduce the following modification in our company policy with regard to annual leave: every year one employee from each department will be awarded special annual bonus leave for outstanding performance.

The eligible employees will have additional five (5) days of annual leave credited on January 15. The bonus leave will be accounted for separately and will remain available until used, notwithstanding any other imitation of the total number of days of annual leave that may be carried forward.

We will have a meeting on December 15 at 10:00 a.m. to discuss the results of the 2006 performance evaluation and approve the final list of employees eligible for the bonus. The announcement to the employees will follow the meeting. If you have any questions or comments, please let me know before the meeting.


Wordlist_HW|Business_L18


You are the HR of a big company. Write the informational memo to the new employees telling them about the ethics policy of the company

Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Ethical or unethical
  • Ethical jobs
  • Ethics of situations
  • The ethics of résumé writing
  • Narrative tenses
  • A pushy salesman
  • Telling a story
  • Code of ethics
  • Narrative tenses
  • Industrial espionage
  • Industrial spies
  • Informational Memos
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing