Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies


Do you think that these activities conform to the basic rules of society?

1. Bribing corrupt foreign officials in order to win foreign orders.

2. Selling supposedly durable goods which you know will not last more than a few years.

3. Telling only half the truth in advertisements, or exaggerating a great deal, or keeping quiet about bad aspects of a product.

Match the titles to the photos


Complete the quotes below with one of the words or phrases


Complete the text using the words and phrases below


The first McDonald’s restaurant opened in 1955 in Des Plaines, Illinois, USA. Today the company operates in 121 countries around the world, with eight key markets (Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, the UK and the US) representing about 80% of its worldwide sales. Its most famous products are hamburgers and cheeseburgers, although a variety of other ready dishes are served.

Read the text about a code of ethics


Ethics count

Text_1

Text_2

Text_3




The Ethical trading Initiative is a UK-based alliance of companies, non-governmental organisations and trade unions working together to promote ethical trade. Members address questions of workers’ rights, child labour, forced labour, sweatshops, working conditions and health & safety at work.

Marks & Spencer is one of the UK’s leading retailers of clothing, foods, household goods and financial services. The company, established in 1884, operates over 300 stores in the UK, and has an additional 150 stores in 27 other countries.

Zurich Financial Services Group, based in Zurich, Switzerland, was founded in 1872. The group offers insurance, investment and retirement planning products and services to individuals and businesses worldwide. It has offices in 60 countries, and also sells through banks, brokers, partners, direct marketing and the Internet.

Match the words to their meanings


Complete the sentences using the words from the previous exercise

Listen to the first part of the interview and complete the gaps

EarthWatch is an international research and conservation and education organisation, and we have over 100 field research projects around the world. That involves, er, scientists looking at how animals and plants are coping in their natural environment. So all these 100 projects are supported from offices that we have in the US, in the UK, in India, in Melbourne, and in Japan and China. And the purpose of our work is to provide the scientific data about what’s happening to animals and plants in the world as climate change and as human population expands and as the environment is degraded. All our field research projects are designed in a way that members of the public, company employees, teachers, youth, young scientists can join our researchers in the field as field assistants and collect real data that is contributing to understanding what is happening.



Listen again and answer the questions

EarthWatch is an international research and conservation and education organisation, and we have over 100 field research projects around the world. That involves, er, scientists looking at how animals and plants are coping in their natural environment. So all these 100 projects are supported from offices that we have in the US, in the UK, in India, in Melbourne, and in Japan and China. And the purpose of our work is to provide the scientific data about what’s happening to animals and plants in the world as climate change and as human population expands and as the environment is degraded. All our field research projects are designed in a way that members of the public, company employees, teachers, youth, young scientists can join our researchers in the field as field assistants and collect real data that is contributing to understanding what is happening.


1. Where does EarthWatch have offices?

2. How are EarthWatch’s field research projects designed?

Listen to the second part of the interview and answer the questions


Interviewer David Hillyard

Interviewer: What role can corporate sponsors play in helping the environment?
David Hillyard: Companies have a huge role to play. Er, our global economy is based on the companies operating and producing goods and services that we consume. So, fundamentally, businesses need to change the way they operate in order to help and reduce the environmental impact of their operations. I think many companies are able to set leading examples, to innovate and to find new solutions to the environmental problems we have. So, er, most people in the world work for a company, so the opportunity for companies to educate and engage their employees and get their employees inspired and motivated to do something in their own communities or in their workplace with respect to the environment is a big opportunity that … that EarthWatch certainly believes in, and EarthWatch works with many companies to try and promote environmental change and then promote good practice so that those leading companies can then influence other companies to follow, and also influence government.


1. Why do businesses need to change the way they operate?

2. What opportunity do companies have with respect to the environment?


Listen to the final part and answer the question

So, for example, we work with HSBC, the global bank, on a climate partnership which is in collaboration with other key conservation organisations such as WWF and the Smithsonian Institute, and through that, we’re providing a learning opportunity online for every single HSBC employee around the world and also setting up five climate-change research centres around the world, and 2,000 HSBC employees over the next five years will join our field researchers in India, in Brazil, in the US, in the UK and in China to carry out data collection to understand how forests are, are coping with climate change and what is happening and what, what, how animals and plants are being affected. So that’s a very important programme, and it’s a very important way of getting company employees involved in our work, understanding what the issues are and then taking that back into their workplace and becoming what we call them climate champions, ambassadors for, for environmental change, so that they can then influence their colleagues and also the way that HSBC operates as a business. So that’s an example of a very important programme for us, er, and a demonstration of how a company can, er, can and should make a difference in terms of these issues.


Complete the sentences

pic1|GE|Adults|Int|Revise and Check 18-23

Read the text and do the exercise below


Fair Trade Federation: four key principles

A. Fair pay

Producers are paid fairly for their products, which means that workers are paid at least that country’s minimum wage. Since the minimum wage is often not enough for basic survival, whenever feasible, workers are paid a living wage, which enables them to cover basic needs, including food, shelter, education and health care for their families. Paying fair wages does not necessarily mean that products cost the consumer more. Since Fair Trade Organisations bypass exploitative middlemen and work directly with producers, they are able to cut costs and return a greater percentage of the retail price to the producers.

В. Co-operation

Co-operatives and producer associations provide a healthy alternative to large-scale manufacturing and sweatshop conditions. Unprotected workers often earn below the minimum wage and most of the profits flow to foreign investors and local elites who have little interest in ensuring the long term health of the communities in which they work. By banding together, workers are able to access credit, reduce raw material costs and establish higher and more just prices for their products.

С. Education

Fair Trade Organisations educate consumers about the importance of purchasing fairly traded products which support living wages and healthy working conditions. By providing information about producers’ history, culture and living conditions, Fair Trade Organisations enhance cross-cultural understanding and respect between consumers and communities in the developing world.

D. The environment

Fair Trade Organisations encourage producers to engage in environmentally friendly practices which manage and use local resources sustainably. Many FTО members work directly with producers in regions of high biodiversity to develop products based on sustainable use of their natural resources, giving communities an incentive to preserve their natural environments for future generations.


Which text part does each statement refer to?

Listen to part one of the interview and match the verbs with the expressions to which they relate


EarthWatch is an international research and conservation and education organisation, and we have over 100 field research projects around the world. That involves, er, scientists looking at how animals and plants are coping in their natural environment. So all these 100 projects are supported from offices that we have in the US, in the UK, in India, in Melbourne, and in Japan and China. And the purpose of our work is to provide the scientific data about what’s happening to animals and plants in the world as climate change and as human population expands and as the environment is degraded. All our field research projects are designed in a way that members of the public, company employees, teachers, youth, young scientists can join our researchers in the field as field assistants and collect real data that is contributing to understanding what is happening.


Match the verbs and expressions to their meanings in the recording

Listen to the second part of the text and put this information in the correct order

So, for example, we work with HSBC, the global bank, on a climate partnership which is in collaboration with other key conservation organisations such as WWF and the Smithsonian Institute, and through that, we’re providing a learning opportunity online for every single HSBC employee around the world and also setting up five climate-change research centres around the world, and 2,000 HSBC employees over the next five years will join our field researchers in India, in Brazil, in the US, in the UK and in China to carry out data collection to understand how forests are, are coping with climate change and what is happening and what, what, how animals and plants are being affected. So that’s a very important programme, and it’s a very important way of getting company employees involved in our work, understanding what the issues are and then taking that back into their workplace and becoming what we call them climate champions, ambassadors for, for environmental change, so that they can then influence their colleagues and also the way that HSBC operates as a business. So that’s an example of a very important programme for us, er, and a demonstration of how a company can, er, can and should make a difference in terms of these issues.

Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Company's relationships
  • McDonald's
  • Ethics count
  • Words, words
  • EarthWatch
  • EarthWatch's priorities
  • Revise the words
  • Fair Trade Federation
  • The interview. Part 1
  • The interview. Part 2
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing