Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3

Choose the correct option

pic4_Adults|Grammar|Pre-Int|L12


Change the form of the verbs in boxes

Vocabulary chase

Complete the sentences with the words given in the box


Fill in each gap with one word. Mind the grammar form where necessary

Listen to an extract from a lecture on business and ethics. Put the topics in the order they are mentioned

pic1|Business|Upper-Int|L20

Today I’m going to talk about business and ethics. First I’ll look at what is meant by business ethics. Then I’ll examine the kind of ethical considerations companies need to address, how they can go about doing business in a more ethical way, and look at some examples of ethical business practices.

So, what are business ethics and why are they seen as important in today’s business climate? Business ethics relate to how a company conducts its business in order to make a profit. Although the primary goal of the company may be to make money, it also recognises that it has a responsibility towards the society in which it operates. The term «corporate social responsibility» is often used, and nowadays many companies have strong corporate social responsibility programmes designed to help create a prosperous, inclusive society.

Now I’ll look at some basic ethical considerations that a company needs to address. The first area is how the company treats its employees. All employees should be treated fairly and with respect. A company that cares for its workers’ welfare will tend to have a happier workforce and a lower turnover of staff. It is also important that workers are recruited on a basis of equal opportunity.

The second area is how a company conducts its day-to-day business. In a manufacturing business, this includes how suppliers of raw materials are chosen and treated. A good example of this is the Fair Trade movement. This initiative ensures that small-scale farmers are paid directly and at a fair price for their crops. A company should also look at its policy on paying suppliers, and ensure that payments are made on time.

Another ethical consideration is the impact the business has on the environment. Manufacturing companies should strive to ensure that production is clean and careful, and look for ways to minimise energy consumption and waste products. Finally, a company can also decide to give something back to the community it operates in. This can be in the form of «corporate giving» programmes, where donations are given to community projects, or by initiating schemes to improve the local community and encouraging employees to work on these schemes.


Listen to the lecture again and complete the missing information. Type ONLY one word in each gap

[h 5 p id=»9578″]

Today I’m going to talk about business and ethics. First I’ll look at what is meant by business ethics. Then I’ll examine the kind of ethical considerations companies need to address, how they can go about doing business in a more ethical way, and look at some examples of ethical business practices.

So, what are business ethics and why are they seen as important in today’s business climate? Business ethics relate to how a company conducts its business in order to make a profit. Although the primary goal of the company may be to make money, it also recognises that it has a responsibility towards the society in which it operates. The term «corporate social responsibility» is often used, and nowadays many companies have strong corporate social responsibility programmes designed to help create a prosperous, inclusive society.

Now I’ll look at some basic ethical considerations that a company needs to address. The first area is how the company treats its employees. All employees should be treated fairly and with respect. A company that cares for its workers’ welfare will tend to have a happier workforce and a lower turnover of staff. It is also important that workers are recruited on a basis of equal opportunity.

The second area is how a company conducts its day-to-day business. In a manufacturing business, this includes how suppliers of raw materials are chosen and treated. A good example of this is the Fair Trade movement. This initiative ensures that small-scale farmers are paid directly and at a fair price for their crops. A company should also look at its policy on paying suppliers, and ensure that payments are made on time.

Another ethical consideration is the impact the business has on the environment. Manufacturing companies should strive to ensure that production is clean and careful, and look for ways to minimise energy consumption and waste products. Finally, a company can also decide to give something back to the community it operates in. This can be in the form of «corporate giving» programmes, where donations are given to community projects, or by initiating schemes to improve the local community and encouraging employees to work on these schemes.

pic2|Business|Upper-Int|L20

Tim’s crash course on ethics 101

We all want to believe that practicing good ethics in both our personal and professional lives is the right thing to do; that we should not wrong, cheat, or defraud others. The reality though is we have allowed unscrupulous ethical practices to creep into our lives like a vine that starts at the root and, if left unchecked, slowly climbs the tree and eventually strangles it.

The current recession is indicative of how we are all having to pay a hefty price for ethical corruption, e.g.; companies are closing, people are out of work, houses have been foreclosed, retirement funds are depleted causing people to work longer and creating a crowded job market for young people to enter. Some would say the recession is a simple matter of economics and nothing else. Nonsense.

The recession was created by greed, which lead to bad lending and investment practices, followed by a shell game for hiding losses, along with lies and cover-ups. The problem became so massive that all the king’s horses, and all the king’s men, couldn’t put Humpty together again.

Actually, the recession has done us a favour by uncovering the truth about ethics in business, and hopefully, it will be a wake-up call for reform. The lesson here is simple: it costs more to follow a path of unethical business practices than to be honest and do what is right. A «fast buck» is just that, a quick way of making money, but it will inevitably cost business and reputations later on (ask a couple of lending institutions if you don’t believe me).

Popular media often teaches us that unethical practices are socially acceptable, even «cool,» and by doing so they are sewing the seeds of our destruction. I don’t see myself as a religious fanatic, but it seems to me that we have lost our way and need to redefine our ethical values and teach them in the office, the classroom, and in the home. People will undoubtedly dismiss such a notion as ridiculous, that their values are just fine thank you, but are they? Do we truly preach such things as honesty, integrity, trust, etc.? Current indicators would suggest otherwise.

Some would suggest that you can only afford to practice ethics in a robust economy (when you have the time and resources to do so). I contend otherwise that good ethical practices are required for rebuilding an economy. Ethics, quite simply, is good business; it represents satisfied customers, referrals, repeat business, and reduced operating costs. Unethical practices simply set up a collision course with disaster, maybe not immediately, but inevitable nonetheless.

And don’t let the government get involved with teaching ethics. That would be like allowing the inmates to run the asylum.

We all know what is right and wrong, but ethics requires a person with strength and character, something that is somewhat uncommon in this day and age. I’m not going to tell you to keep your word, or to be honest and lead an upright and respectable life. You should know this already. The question is, do you have the fortitude to do so?

Perhaps, these simple guidelines will help:

  • Learn to say «No». It is an incredibly powerful word and something we do not say enough of. At times it may seem awkward and uncomfortable to say, but learn to say «No» nonetheless.
  • Avoid politics. The more entangled you become in them, the more your principles are compromised.
  • Go the extra mile. Avoid the temptation to take the easy way out. Short cuts may seem nice, but following the right path is more rewarding in the long run.
  • Write a code of conduct defining how employees are to behave on the job.
  • Recognize and reward ethical behavior. Penalize bad behavior.
  • Report indiscretions, either internally within your company, or to external sources, such as the Better Business Bureau. As a tip, make sure it is well documented. Don’t want to report it? Then don’t complain or whine about it to others.
  • Participate in and promote discussions on ethics, either in the office, at home, in school, in civic groups, on the internet, or wherever. Raise the consciousness on ethics.
  • Last but not least, lead by example. Become a role model for how you want others to behave.

From the article «The Price of Ethics» by Tim Bryce


Fill in the gaps with the highlighted words from the text. Change the form where necessary

Read the task

pic1_Adults|Grammar|Pre-Int|L12

Your manager would like to improve the level of staff motivation in the company. He has asked you to write a report giving details of current levels of motivation and suggesting ways to improve it.

In your report:

  • explain how you assessed the current motivation levels;
  • state the reasons for the current levels;
  • suggest some ways to improve the situation.

Write a report. Use phrases from the list

Introduction

  • The aim of this report is to evaluate/describe/analyse/recommend/consider/suggest …
  • This report aims to …
  • In order to improve …
  • The report is based on a survey conducted among …
  • The report is the result of a discussion which took place among …

Main body

  • It should be considered that …
  • It is worth considering that …
  • The first observation to make is …
  • First of all, …
  • Secondly, …
  • Furthermore, …
  • Lastly, …
  • Finally, …
  • In fact, …
  • According to the majority of respondents, …
  • However, …
  • In spite of the fact that …
  • The outlook for the company is far from optimistic.
  • The future looks bleak.
  • The future looks is promising.
  • This seems unlikely in the near/foreseeable future.
  • It has been stressed that …

Making/giving recommendations

  • I would strongly recommend that we should increase …
  • In the light of the results of the survey, I would advise against …
  • I feel it would be to our advantage if …
  • The best solution would be to …
  • This will have an impact on …

Conclusion(s)

  • As long as/provided that these recommendations are taken into consideration, …
  • In conclusion, …
  • The reseach shows/demonstrates that …
  • From the research/the evidence, we conclude that …


«Report»

Read the questions and prepare your 3-minute speech on the topic «International markets: negotiating»

pic6_Business|Upper-Int|L16

Cover the following questions:

1. How good are you at negotiating?

2. What are some good negotiation tactics?

3. Do you do negotiations at work, in your personal life or while shopping?

4. What have you had to negotiate for in your life? (For example, a house, a car, something in the street market, etc.)

5. Who do you think are better at negotiations — men or women? Why?

Allow your browser the access to the microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

If you open the lesson plan you will be able to assign separate pages as homework or all the homework pages at once.