Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems

Warm-up


pic1_Business|Upper-Int|L5


Useful language

Answering the phone

  • Hello, Carla.
  • Rodriguez speaking.
  • Good morning. Tiger Ltd.

Making contact

  • I’d like to speak to Martin Krause, please.
  • Could I have the sales department, please?

Identifying yourself

  • This is / My name’s Karin Nordby.
  • Karin Nordby speaking.

Stating your purpose

  • I’m calling about …
  • The reason I’m calling is …

Making arrangements

  • Could we meet on Monday at 11:00?
  • How/What about June 12th?
  • Is 9:30 convenient/OK?

Responding

  • That’s fine/OK for me.
  • Sorry. I can’t make it then.
  • No problem.

Closing

  • Good. So. I’ll see you on the 8th.
  • Thank you. Goodbye.
  • Right. / OK, then.
  • That’s great, I’ll see you …

Changing arrangements

  • I’m afraid I can’t come on Friday. I’m very busy that day.
  • I’m sorry. I can’t make it on Tuesday. I’ve got something on that morning.
  • We’ve got an appointment for ten o’clock, but I’m afraid something’s come up.
  • Could we fix another time?

Role-play these two telephone situations

  1. You are a company employee who has arranged to meet a colleague (your Teacher) from one of your subsidiaries. Explain that you cannot keep the appointment and give a reason. Suggest an alternative day.
  2. You are on a business trip to Singapore and need to stay an extra day. Your hotel is full. Telephone the airline office. Talk to the representative (your Teacher) to arrange a different flight and a night at another hotel.

Background


Read the background and do the task below


Complete the chart with the information from the text

Stage 1


pic3_Business|Upper-Int|L5


 

Useful language

Answering the phone

  • Hello, Carla.
  • Rodriguez speaking.
  • Good morning. Tiger Ltd.

Making contact

  • I’d like to speak to Martin Krause, please.
  • Could I have the sales department, please?

Identifying yourself

  • This is / My name’s Karin Nordby.
  • Karin Nordby speaking.

Stating your purpose

  • I’m calling about …
  • The reason I’m calling is …

Making arrangements

  • Could we meet on Monday at 11:00?
  • How/What about June 12th?
  • Is 9:30 convenient/OK?

Responding

  • That’s fine/OK for me.
  • Sorry. I can’t make it then.
  • No problem.

Closing

  • Good. So. I’ll see you on the 8th.
  • Thank you. Goodbye.
  • Right. / OK, then.
  • That’s great, I’ll see you …

Changing arrangements

  • I’m afraid I can’t come on Friday. I’m very busy that day.
  • I’m sorry. I can’t make it on Tuesday. I’ve got something on that morning.
  • We’ve got an appointment for ten o’clock, but I’m afraid something’s come up.
  • Could we fix another time?

Read the situation and role-play the telephone conversation to set up the meeting

  • The Head of Travel at NeoTech phones the Account Manager of BTS to set up a meeting, so that he can discuss the problems that executives have had while on business trips.
  • You are the Head of Travel at NeoTech.

Read the information in your diary and check when you are available for a meeting.
Here is your diary for the week.


Day of the week Morning Afternoon
Monday All day at exhibition
Tuesday Free Appointment at dentist 2 p.m.
Wednesday Meeting Free after 1 p.m.
Thursday Training session all day and early evening
Friday Correspondence + interviews Free after 2 p.m.

Stage 2



Role-play the telephone conversation

NeoTech‘s Head of Travel phones BTS‘s Account Manager to change the time of the meeting.

Some equipment has been stolen from their office, and the police are investigating.

The Head of Travel suggests meeting in two weeks’ time on Wednesday.

BTS‘s Account Manager cannot meet on Wednesday — he/she is giving a speech at an international travel conference.
He/She suggests an alternative day and time.

Stage 3



You are the Travel consultant. Your teacher is the Account manager.
Try to solve the problems. Swap roles


Following a request from BTS’s Account Manager, NeoTech’s Head of Travel sends summaries of four problems which senior executives at NeoTech had during recent business trips .


Hotel Problem

Last Thursday, I checked into the Excelsior Hotel. The receptionist told me I had been upgraded and my room was on the 16- floor. Well, I stayed there for an hour or so then asked to move to another room. The «upgraded» room had no safe for my money, and the lighting was very bad. Also, there was a group of noisy people next door.

The new room was no better. I couldn’t take a shower because there was no water for four hours. The coffee machine didn’t work, the ice machine was out of order and the desk was too small. I called the receptionist to get some action, but she seemed too busy to do anything.

This hotel simply isn’t up to standard. What can you do about it for me?

Car Rental Problem

The rental office at the airport couldn’t give me the car I had reserved. It was in the medium price range at $250 a week. Instead, they offered me a choice:

  • a smaller car, which was uncomfortable and had a small trunk;
  • a bigger car for an extra $20 a day.

I was expecting a free upgrade, but the clerk on the desk refused to do that. His attitude was «take it or leave it». So I hired the bigger car. When the company billed me, I ended up paying $490 for the car.

Lost luggage

Three months ago, I travelled to Atlanta, Georgia. Two pieces of luggage didn’t arrive. I reported the loss to the airline. They promised to find the bags and send them to me. Some weeks later, they wrote saying they couldn’t find the bags and asked me to fill out a claim form. I didn’t hear from them for another month, then they asked me to send receipts for all the missing articles. I didn’t have receipts for the lost items.

It’s three months later, and still no news from the airline. My e-mails and letters get no response. The airline has recently merged with another company, and I wonder if this is part of the problem. Can you help?

Diverted Flight

I was on a flight to Moscow, but the flight was diverted to Helsinki because of bad weather.There was a lot of confusion at Helsinki because the airline sent all the passengers to the same hotel for the night.

Some passengers became very aggressive when they tried to get a room. I had to share a room with another passenger. The hotel made all passengers pay for their rooms.

The next morning, we had to wait six hours in a cold terminal for the flight to Moscow.

The airline wouldn’t pay for our hotel expenses. They said the circumstances were «beyond their control». I think we should be compensated for all the inconvenience.

Expert’s commentary


Listen to the interview with a consultant discussing the key issues raised by the case study

interviewer: Lis Credé is an organization development consultant. She believes that the effectiveness of any organization can be improved by building the quality of the relationships within it, whether they are person-to-person, team-to-team, department to department, or organization to organization.
interviewer: Liz, how would advise Business Travel Services to deal with the problems that their client has had?
Liz Credé: I’d advise them to consider two things: the first — the client; and the second — the problem. So by considering the client, what I mean is really understanding their experience — what they’ve been through, how they felt about it, what all the worries and frustrations have been about. And then secondly, dealing with the problem. Be really clear about what they can do to solve the problem but don’t commit to anything they can’t do. So they can help with the baggage collection, but they can’t guarantee to find it.
interviewer: Are there steps that BTS can take to avoid such problems in the future?
Liz Credé: Yes I think there’s a couple of steps that BTS can take. The first would be to set up some preferred supplier arrangements with airlines and hotels and car rentals. By that I mean getting into an arrangement where they guarantee levels of quality and service and costs — so that there’s no surprises for the clients. And then secondly, setting up a customer support service so that when clients are travelling they have a special number to call for help.
interviewer: What should BTS do now to improve relations with its most important client?
Liz Credé: I think the key thing that BTS should do is to remember that their most important clients probably like to consider themselves as very special. And so treating them as special will be really valuable to them. Couple of ways that they could do that: one would be for BTS to offer goodwill gestures. By that I mean offering a better model of car at a cheaper price, or a better grade of hotel room at the cheaper option. And secondly, ensuring that they solve all the problems that have been experienced by the client and that they sort those out and guarantee really great service from now on.

  1. What advice does Liz Crede give?
  2. What are the steps that BTS can take to avoid such problems in the future?
  3. What should BTS do now to improve relations with its most important client?

A fax


Choose the appropriate information from the box to complete the fax from the Atlantida Hotel

Connected speech



1. They travel by train.
2. It’ll cost us a lot more.
3. I’m afraid he’ll let us down.
4. We’ll visit them every Thursday.
5. You’ll go to Frankfurt every week.
6. I leave at six.

What’s the rule?

Notice the pronunciation of the contracted forms such as you’ll, we’ll, they’ll, etc.

The [l] in those contractions is called dark «l». It is different from the clear «l» in luggage, delay, we’ll arrive, for example.

[l] is clear before a vowel sound or [j] but dark elsewhere, as for example, in film, milk, etc.


Choose the sentences that you hear

  • They travel by train.
  • They’ll travel by train.

Asking for agreement


A question tag is a short question that we often put in the end of a sentence when we speak. Listen to the intonation in these question tags

1. Surely there’s an earlier flight, isn’t there?
2. This queue doesn’t seem to be moving, does it?

pic7_Business|Upper-Int|L5


What’s the rule?

Question tags have a different function depending on the intonation used.

If the voice rises, as in example 1, the speaker is checking information. So this is more like a genuine question.

If the voice falls, as in example 2, the speaker is actually very confident and asking another person to confirm/agree with what he/she is saying


Listen to these question tags and select the right intonation (⤴) or (⤵)

1. She’s going to take an earlier flight back, isn’t she?
2. You’re not travelling on the night train, are you?
3. We’ll get a discount, won’t we?
4. You’ve phoned the travel agency, haven’t you?
5. You’ll phone in if there’s a delay, won’t you?
6. Our flight isn’t delayed, is it?

Eye-to-eye contact


Read the article from the Financial Times


Corporate road warriors

By Stuart Crainer

1. The characteristic that most distinguishes today’s executives is not their technological sophistication but the amount of time they spend on the move. To observe the real impact of globalisation, you only have to walk around an international airport. Among the crowds of tourists, an army of road warriors and corporate executives march red-eyed across the world’s time zones. Global markets mean constant global travel.

2. Management consultants are among the most frenetic frequent fliers. They routinely cross continents for a face-to-face meeting and then return home. They point to the importance of personal contact. For a profession built on rational analysis, it seems illogical. Face-to-face meetings when one of the parties is exhausted and jet-lagged seem unlikely to benefit anyone. But most consultants act as if e-mail and satellite links had never been invented. For the masters of logic, only the face-to-face experience will do.

3. The question is why all the technological gadgetry has failed to make a dent in the amount of business travel? The answer seems to lie with a simple statistic. More than 90 percent of human communication is nonverbal (some studies put it as high as 93 percent). Facial expressions, body language, eye contact — these are all key conduits. Without them, you can’t get past first base. It’s tough to bond over the Internet. «Most of us still want face-to-face contact,» says Cary Cooper, professor of organisational psychology and health at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST). «A lot of people rely on their personalities to persuade others,» he says. «That doesn’t come out in e-mails, and video conferencing is limiting. They may also want to influence people outside of the meeting. A lot of lobbying goes on before and after meetings. That’s why eyeball-to-eyeball is so important. We still don’t fully trust the technology even though it’s been around for a while. We prefer to talk behind closed doors.»

4. We also read body language to pick up the atmosphere, he says. «We walk into a meeting and pick up the feel of what the other people are thinking. We watch how Y reacts to what X is saying. You can’t do that by video conference. Most of us don’t have the self-confidence to believe we can build the sorts of relationships we need with clients and suppliers down the wire. Business travel won’t decrease for that reason. It’s a shame because at the moment we’re burning out an awful lot of people.»


What is the key message of the article? Choose the best alternative.

a) Videoconferencing will eventually take over face-to-face meetings.
b) Business meetings will always be necessary because people prefer to meet face-to-face.
c) Airlines face a difficult future as business travel declines.


Answer: b

Road warriors


Read the whole article again. Are these statements True or False?

Corporate road warriors

By Stuart Crainer

1. The characteristic that most distinguishes today’s executives is not their technological sophistication but the amount of time they spend on the move. To observe the real impact of globalisation, you only have to walk around an international airport. Among the crowds of tourists, an army of road warriors and corporate executives march red-eyed across the world’s time zones. Global markets mean constant global travel.

2. Management consultants are among the most frenetic frequent fliers. They routinely cross continents for a face-to-face meeting and then return home. They point to the importance of personal contact. For a profession built on rational analysis, it seems illogical. Face-to-face meetings when one of the parties is exhausted and jet-lagged seem unlikely to benefit anyone. But most consultants act as if e-mail and satellite links had never been invented. For the masters of logic, only the face-to-face experience will do.

3. The question is why all the technological gadgetry has failed to make a dent in the amount of business travel? The answer seems to lie with a simple statistic. More than 90 percent of human communication is nonverbal (some studies put it as high as 93 percent). Facial expressions, body language, eye contact — these are all key conduits. Without them, you can’t get past first base. It’s tough to bond over the Internet. «Most of us still want face-to-face contact,» says Cary Cooper, professor of organisational psychology and health at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST). «A lot of people rely on their personalities to persuade others,» he says. «That doesn’t come out in e-mails, and video conferencing is limiting. They may also want to influence people outside of the meeting. A lot of lobbying goes on before and after meetings. That’s why eyeball-to-eyeball is so important. We still don’t fully trust the technology even though it’s been around for a while. We prefer to talk behind closed doors.»

4. We also read body language to pick up the atmosphere, he says. «We walk into a meeting and pick up the feel of what the other people are thinking. We watch how Y reacts to what X is saying. You can’t do that by video conference. Most of us don’t have the self-confidence to believe we can build the sorts of relationships we need with clients and suppliers down the wire. Business travel won’t decrease for that reason. It’s a shame because at the moment we’re burning out an awful lot of people.»



Look through the first paragraph again and choose the best alternative to complete these statements

Paragraphs 2 and 3



Find the words in paragraph 2 that are the opposites of these expressions

Corporate road warriors

By Stuart Crainer

2. Management consultants are among the most frenetic frequent fliers. They routinely cross continents for a face-to-face meeting and then return home. They point to the importance of personal contact. For a profession built on rational analysis, it seems illogical. Face-to-face meetings when one of the parties is exhausted and jet-lagged seem unlikely to benefit anyone. But most consultants act as if e-mail and satellite links had never been invented. For the masters of logic, only the face-to-face experience will do.



Look again through paragraph 3 and choose the correct meaning for the expressions in italics

3. The question is why all the technological gadgetry has failed to make a dent in the amount of business travel? The answer seems to lie with a simple statistic. More than 90 percent of human communication is nonverbal (some studies put it as high as 93 percent). Facial expressions, body language, eye contact — these are all key conduits. Without them, you can’t get past first base. It’s tough to bond over the Internet. «Most of us still want face-to-face contact,» says Cary Cooper, professor of organisational psychology and health at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST). «A lot of people rely on their personalities to persuade others,» he says. «That doesn’t come out in e-mails, and video conferencing is limiting. They may also want to influence people outside of the meeting. A lot of lobbying goes on before and after meetings. That’s why eyeball-to-eyeball is so important. We still don’t fully trust the technology even though it’s been around for a while. We prefer to talk behind closed doors.»


Face-to-face experience


pic10_Business|Upper-Int|L5


Match each verb to the noun that it goes with in the article


Now match each verb from the exercise above with another noun that it can typically go with

A business traveller’s priorities


pic11_Business|Upper-Int|L5


Stephanie Taylor is a businesswoman who travels regularly. Listen to the first part of the interview and choose the three priorities she mentions


Interviewer: What are the main priorities for business travellers today?
Stephanie Taylor: The first thing I’d say is the need for, for good organisation: for someone to organise everything for you. Erm.. air tickets of course — transport to and from the airport … accommodation. It’s really important to erm, to have, to have that support. And the second thing I’d say relates to the airline that you choose or the cost of the flights. I think it’s important to balance cost concerns with the need for comfort for the business traveller. So, on a short haul flight into Europe, perhaps cost is, er, is the main factor — looking for a cheap ticket, erm — whereas travelling to a different continent, it’s important to, to look more at the comfort factor plenty of space and, and, sleep, the ability to sleep on the flight. So cost, comfort is important. And then thirdly, I think, for the business traveller, erm, it’s a big advantage if you can be very patient, because, er, there are often delays, and also, erm, it’s important to be able to work in the airport. It is sort of an extension of your office when you’re travelling a lot. So, if you’re in a business lounge, that’s okay, but it’s also important to be able to work in an economy class, general airport, I think. So it helps to be very patient.
Interviewer: With new communications technology, do businesspeople need to travel so much?
Stephanie Taylor: Yes, I think they probably do, particularly … I think it’s particularly important to establish good face-to-face relations with colleagues or with customers. Perhaps after the first meeting you can continue your relationship by telephone and by Internet. But I think, er, yes, from a PR perspective, and contact with customers, I think business travel will continue to be as important as it is now.

Listen to what Stephanie says about future business travel and complete her prediction below

Speaker 1: What further developments do you see in business travel?
Speaker 2: Hmm. Perhaps, particularly in the area of accommodation, I think hotels will need to improve their standards in general. There are some very good hotels already, but I think more hotels will provide facilities for businesspeople … perhaps some specific facilities for businesswomen.

Talking about travelling


pic12_Business|Upper-Int|L5


Read the task and prepare your 3-minute speech on the topic of «Travel»

Cover the points:

1. What is your worst travel experience?
2. Do you often travel on business? If not, would you like to?
3. What is important for you when staying in a hotel, for either work or pleasure?
4. What are the disadvantages of travelling by plane?
5. What problems may a traveller have with the crew and ground staff?


Allow your browser the access to the microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared


Read the complaints

Hotel Problem

Last Thursday, I checked into the Excelsior Hotel. The receptionist told me I had been upgraded and my room was on the 16th floor. Well, I stayed there for an hour or so, then asked to move to another room. The «upgraded» room had no safe for my money, and the lighting was very bad. Also, there was a group of noisy people next door.

The new room was no better. I couldn’t take a shower because there was no water for four hours. The coffee machine didn’t work, the ice machine was out of order and the desk was too small. I called the receptionist to get some action, but she seemed too busy to do anything.

This hotel simply isn’t up to standard. What can you do about it for me?

Car Rental Problem

The rental office at the airport couldn’t give me the car I had reserved. It was in the medium price range at $250 a week. Instead, they offered me a choice:

a smaller car, which was uncomfortable and had a small trunk;
a bigger car for an extra $20 a day.
I was expecting a free upgrade, but the clerk on the desk refused to do that. His attitude was «take it or leave it». So I hired the bigger car. When the company billed me, I ended up paying $490 for the car.

Lost luggage

Three months ago, I travelled to Atlanta, Georgia. Two pieces of luggage didn’t arrive. I reported the loss to the airline. They promised to find the bags and send them to me. Some weeks later, they wrote saying they couldn’t find the bags and asked me to fill out a claim form. I didn’t hear from them for another month, then they asked me to send receipts for all the missing articles. I didn’t have receipts for the lost items.

It’s three months later, and there is still no news from the airline. My e-mails and letters get no response. The airline has recently merged with another company, and I wonder if this is a part of the problem. Can you help?

Diverted Flight

I was on a flight to Moscow, but the flight was diverted to Helsinki because of bad weather. There was a lot of confusion at Helsinki because the airline sent all the passengers to the same hotel for the night.

Some passengers became very aggressive when they tried to get a room. I had to share a room with another passenger. The hotel made all passengers pay for their rooms.

The next morning, we had to wait six hours in a cold terminal for the flight to Moscow.

The airline wouldn’t pay for our hotel expenses. They said the circumstances were «beyond their control». I think we should be compensated for all the inconvenience.


Wordlist

1. experience 8. confirm
2. apologise 9. complaint
3. negotiate 10. compensation
4. car rental firm 11. admit
5. discount 12. upgrade
6. booking 13. encourage
7. concern

As the Account Manager for BTS, write an e-mail to NeoTech‘s Head of Travel, apologising for the inconvenience. Offer some compensation and explain what steps BTS has taken to make sure a similar problem does not happen again

Instructions

  1. Read the task carefully.
  2. Plan what you are going to write about.
  3. Write according to your plan.
  4. Check your writing before sending it for evaluation.
  5. Learn the rules and see the sample here.
  6. Please use Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.

УрокУрок HomeworkHomework КурсКурс
  • Warm-up
  • Background
  • Stage 1
  • Stage 2
  • Stage 3
  • Expert’s commentary
  • A fax
  • Connected speech
  • Asking for agreement
  • Eye-to-eye contact
  • Road warriors
  • Paragraphs 2 and 3
  • Face-to-face experience
  • A business traveller’s priorities
  • Talking about travelling
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing