Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating

pic1_Business|Upper-Int|L17

Answer the questions

1. What is «a market»?

2. What is «an international market»?

3. What opportunities does an international market provide?

4. Why don’t some countries want to open their markets?

Read the rules and do the exercise below

Language Review

1. «Unless» is often used in warnings:

Examples:

  • We’ll be late unless we hurry.
  • Unless you work harder, you’re not going to pass the examination.
  • The man said he would hit me unless I told him where the money was.

2. Instead «unless» you can use «if … not»:

Examples:

  • Don’t tell Ann what I said if she doesn’t ask you.
  • We’ll be late if we don’t hurry.

3. «As long as» / «provided» / «providing (that)» — these expressions mean but only if (in case):

Examples:

  • You can use my car as long as you drive carefully. (= In that case if you drive carefully)
  • Travelling by car is convenient provided (that) you have somewhere to park. (= In that case if there is room for parking)
  • Providing (that) she studies hard, she should pass the examination. (= Only if she studies hard)

4. When talking about the future, do not use «will» with «unless», «as long as», «provided», or «providing» phrases.

Use the form below (Present Simple):

  • We’ll be late unless we hurry. (not: «unless we will hurry»)
  • Providing she studies hard … (not: «providing she will study»)

Choose the correct answer

Listen to the audio and choose the best title

  • competitiveness [kəmˈpɛtɪtɪvnɪs] — an aggressive willingness to compete
  • to seek — try to get or reach
  • to combat [ˈkɒmbæt] — to ​try to ​stop something ​unpleasant or ​harmful from ​happening or ​increasing
  • slowdown — a ​reduction in ​speed, ​activity, or the ​rate that things are ​produced
  • core — the ​basic and most ​important ​part of something
  • commitment — something that you must do or ​deal with that takes your time
  • to exceed — to be more than a particular number or amount




by Xin Zhiming

«The US should focus on improving its overall economic competitiveness instead of seeking protectionism to combat its economic slowdown,» said White Paper: American Business in China. «And it should not argue for a stronger currency to reduce its trade deficit with China, since the value of the yuan is not the fundamental cause of the deficit,» said the White Paper, which was released by the American Chamber of Commerce (AmCham) China, AmCham Shanghai and AmCham South China Tuesday.

The US economy is currently slowing, while its trade deficit with China remains high, standing at $163.3 billion last year. The deficit has led to protectionism against Chinese goods and investment in the US. The two countries should make «defending and preserving the openness of the trade relationship a core commitment,» the White Paper said. «Instances of co-operation between China and US far exceed instances of dispute.» An open US and an open China will lead to sustained benefits for both US companies and citizens back home,» said Harley Seyedin, Chairman of AmCham South China.

from China Daily


Read the article. Decide if the statements are True or False

Read the text and choose the best title

  • labour unions — organizations that represent the people who work in a particular industry, protect their rights, and discuss their pay and working conditions with employers
  • to revalue — to ​change the ​value of something or to ​consider it again




by Andrea Hopkins

The US trade deficit with China cost 2.3 million American jobs over six years, the Economic Policy Institute said on Wednesday.

Even when they found new jobs, workers who had lost jobs to Chinese competition saw their earnings decrease by an average of $8,146 each year because the new jobs paid less, according to the report, funded in part by labor unions.

«(We hope) it will help to focus the debate on trade to where it needs to be right now with respect to China,» said Scott Paul, Executive Director of the Alliance for American Manufacturing.

US manufacturers, labor unions, and many lawmakers have long accused China of manipulating its currency to give Chinese companies an unfair advantage in international trade, and are pressing China to continue to allow the yuan to rise against the US dollar.

China has said the United States should recognize how much its yuan currency has already risen against the dollar — it is about 20 per cent higher since China revalued its currency in July 2005.

China has also said the fact that Americans save much less of their income than the Chinese do has increased the trade deficit. Chinese-made goods have been extremely popular in recent years with US consumers looking for low prices.

from Reuters


Look at the article again. Decide if the statements are True or False

Match the opposites


Complete the sentences with the words

Andy Simmons is a partner at The Gap Partnership and is an expert on negotiating. Listen to the first part of the interview and answer the questions


Interviewer Andy Simmons

Interviewer: How do you train people to be good negotiators?
Andy Simmons: There are three things that are important in negotiation training. Number one is to create an environment where people can do. Using case studies and the use of video, people are able to see how they behave on video. They can look at what’s appropriate and they can look at what is inappropriate. What I mean by that is, where they’re effective and where they are ineffective. Using feedback, people are then able to change their behaviour — rather than just telling people about negotiation or reading a book. So the experience is vital. Number two: it’s about keeping the learning fresh. Using different vehicles and different formats, whether that be, er, e-learning, watching videos online — or recently podcasts — or whether it be through a series of different activities following on the workshop to keep it live, keep it fresh, and to stop people falling into those old habits. The third thing that’s very important indeed is to look at the feedback from the negotiations themselves. And at The Gap Partnership, we use a ROI system — which means «return on investment». We measure the effectiveness of those negotiations for many months after the training, and this enables us to tweak and change the training and make it more customised. But it also allows the client to see the effects of that training, to measure it, and that provides them with a degree of investment for the future.


1. What three things according to Andy are important in negotiating?

2. Why is making video record important?

3. What is a ROI system?


Listen to the second part of the text and complete the gaps

Interviewer Andy Simmons

Interviewer: Do the same techniques work with every type of negotiation?
Andy Simmons: Yes, this is a good point. Um, there is no one way to negotiate. There are many different ways to negotiate. The common misnomer is that people find one way of negotiating and they don’t change. In fact, this concept of appropriateness — that’s what we teach — says that there is no one way, there are many different ways, ranging from the very competitive, very high-conflict negotiations that are generally win-lose, all the way through to the very, very co-operative negotiations, which are deemed as win-win. And there’s no right or wrong, or there’s no good or bad, it’s just what’s appropriate to the circumstances that you either find yourself in as a negotiator or, better still, the circumstances that you put yourself in, if you’re really in charge of that negotiation and if you’re really well prepared.



Listen to the final part and answer the questions

Interviewer Andy Simmons

Interviewer: What makes a really good negotiator?
Andy Simmons: There are many behaviours that make a good negotiator. And, er, when I say «good negotiator», it’s the word «appropriate» — appropriate in being able to change — and so the overriding thing is to be versatile, to be adaptable, to be able to change your behaviour according to those circumstances. And the behaviours that are appropriate are everything from being able to manage conflict, be able to, er, manage the pressure in a face-to-face negotiation, right the way through to being able to plan effectively, to be analytical, but at the other end of the spectrum, to also be open-minded and creative, in other words to come up with ideas on how to repackage the negotiation, and to have the self-discipline in being able to communicate that with the right use of language. And when I say «the right use of language», er, effective negotiators are able to watch for when there is more scope for negotiation. What I mean by that is, the ability to be able to look out and listen for what we call «soft exposing give-aways». These are the small bits of language around proposals that will tell you that your counterpart, the person on the other side of the table, has more negotiation room. And these are words like «I’m looking for …» «roughly …», «in the region of …», «around about …», «I’d like …», «I»m hoping for …», «currently …», «right now …», er, «probably». Er, these are words that negotiators spot to help them understand just how movable the other side is. And so language itself is very important and the control of that language; but also the ability to listen. Because the more information you have, the more powerful you become, because information is power.


1. What behaviours are appropriate for being a good negotiator?

2. How do you tell if there is more scope for negotiation?


Read the information and put the stages of negotiation in the correct order

In his book The Art of Winning, Harry Mills says that most negotiations have 7 stages.


Role-play these negotiations. Try to get a good outcome in each situation

Starting positions

  • We’d like to reach a deal with you today.
  • Right, let’s try to get 10% off their list prices.

Exploring positions

  • Can you tell me a little about …?
  • What do you have in mind?

Making offers and concessions

  • If you order now, we’ll give you a discount.
  • We’d be prepared to offer you a better price if you increased your order.

Checking understanding

  • What do you mean?
  • Have I got this right?
  • If I understand you correctly, …
  • You mean, if we ordered …, would…?
  • Are you saying …?

Refusing an offer

  • I’m not sure about that.
  • That’s more than we usually offer.
  • That would be difficult for us.

Accepting an offer

  • Sounds a good idea to me. As long as we …
  • Good, we agree on the price, quantity, discounts …

Playing for time

  • I’d like to think about it.
  • I’ll have to consult my colleagues about that.

Closing the deal

  • I think we’ve covered everything.
  • Great! We’ve got a deal.
  • Following up the deal.
  • Let me know if there are any problems.
  • If there are any other points, I’ll e-mail you.


Role-play

1. You are a handbag supplier. Because there is strong demand for your new range of handbags, you want to: increase your list prices by 20%, increase your delivery time to three weeks, offer the buyer a one-year contract.

2. You are an agent for an overseas kitchen equipment company. You exceeded your sales target by 25% last year. You want the company to: increase your commission on sales from 5% to 10%, invite you for a visit to their head office and pay all the expenses of the trip, make you an exclusive agent for their goods, offer you a five-year contract.

Click on the wrong variant in bold

pic3_L25|Grammar

Read this article from the Financial Times and answer the questions


Panasonic enters European white goods market

by Robin Harding in Tokyo

To enter a mature and notoriously competitive market during a recession might seem foolish, especially when that market loads its washing machines from the front, not the top. Yet Panasonic‘s launch of large white goods such as washing machines and refrigerators on the European market reflects the Japanese electronics group’s willingness to take risks. The products had to be completely redesigned to meet European tastes. The arrival of such a deep-pocketed competitor will shake up a market dominated by European brands such as Electrolux and Bosch and is set to be the first of many new areas that Panasonic invades. That Panasonic is able to make such moves reflects the transformation that the company, which sells almost every electrical and electronic product imaginable in Japan, has undergone over the past 10 years.

«In the past, we had a strict division system, but we were not good at co-ordinating divisions,» said Hitoshi Otsuki, the Director of Panasonic‘s overseas operations.

Overseas sales companies were fed products, not always suitable, from a number of divisions in Japan. After 2000, Panasonic radically changed its structure to cut overlap and focus on profitability — it now closes any business that has not made money for the past three years — and the company is on the offensive abroad again. The sale of white goods in Europe is on the direct instructions of Fumio Ohtsubo, Panasonic‘s President. In the revamped company, the project has gone from conception to launch in only 18 months. The move to sell white goods in Europe is backed by Panasonic‘s belief that it has an edge in green technologies, such as low power consumption, that will appeal to Europeans. «We don’t just introduce ordinary products. In this case, we have environmental technologies,» said Mr Otsuki.

In the context of Panasonic‘s expected turnover of ¥7,750bn ($80bn) this financial year — and its forecast net loss of ¥380bn — European appliance sales are unlikely to make much difference. The company’s goal is to double current sales of €260m ($331 m) over the next five years.

However, Panasonic sees Europe as a stepping stone for white-goods sales in Russia and the Middle East, on top of its markets in Asia. Mr Otsuki said the company was also considering the launch of other products abroad, such as hearing aids in China and other Asian markets, while there was interest from buyers, including in the UK, for its new fuel cell-based systems that generate heat and power at home.


Choose the alternative with the closest meaning to the italicized expression from the text


Decide if these statements are True or False

Listen to part one of the interview with Andy Simmons. Choose the correct definitions for the nouns as they are used in the recording


Interviewer Andy Simmons

Interviewer: How do you train people to be good negotiators?
Andy Simmons: There are three things that are important in negotiation training. Number one is to create an environment where people can do. Using case studies and the use of video, people are able to see how they behave on video. They can look at what’s appropriate and they can look at what is inappropriate. What I mean by that is, where they’re effective and where they are ineffective. Using feedback, people are then able to change their behaviour — rather than just telling people about negotiation or reading a book. So the experience is vital. Number two: it’s about keeping the learning fresh. Using different vehicles and different formats, whether that be, er, e-learning, watching videos online — or recently podcasts — or whether it be through a series of different activities following on the workshop to keep it live, keep it fresh, and to stop people falling into those old habits. The third thing that’s very important indeed is to look at the feedback from the negotiations themselves. And at The Gap Partnership, we use a ROI system — which means «return on investment». We measure the effectiveness of those negotiations for many months after the training, and this enables us to tweak and change the training and make it more customised. But it also allows the client to see the effects of that training, to measure it, and that provides them with a degree of investment for the future.



Listen to part two of the interview and find the adjectives and expressions used as adjectives that mean the following

Interviewer Andy Simmons

Interviewer: Do the same techniques work with every type of negotiation?
Andy Simmons: Yes, this is a good point. Um, there is no one way to negotiate. There are many different ways to negotiate. The common misnomer is that people find one way of negotiating and they don’t change. In fact, this concept of appropriateness — that’s what we teach — says that there is no one way, there are many different ways, ranging from the very competitive, very high-conflict negotiations that are generally win-lose, all the way through to the very, very co-operative negotiations, which are deemed as win-win. And there’s no right or wrong, or there’s no good or bad, it’s just what’s appropriate to the circumstances that you either find yourself in as a negotiator or, better still, the circumstances that you put yourself in, if you’re really in charge of that negotiation and if you’re really well prepared.


Listen to Andy Simmons from part three and remember what makes a really good negotiator

Interviewer Andy Simmons

Interviewer: What makes a really good negotiator?
Andy Simmons: There are many behaviours that make a good negotiator. And, er, when I say «good negotiator», it’s the word «appropriate» — appropriate in being able to change — and so the overriding thing is to be versatile, to be adaptable, to be able to change your behaviour according to those circumstances. And the behaviours that are appropriate are everything from being able to manage conflict, be able to, er, manage the pressure in a face-to-face negotiation, right the way through to being able to plan effectively, to be analytical, but at the other end of the spectrum, to also be open-minded and creative, in other words to come up with ideas on how to repackage the negotiation, and to have the self-discipline in being able to communicate that with the right use of language. And when I say «the right use of language», er, effective negotiators are able to watch for when there is more scope for negotiation. What I mean by that is, the ability to be able to look out and listen for what we call «soft exposing give-aways». These are the small bits of language around proposals that will tell you that your counterpart, the person on the other side of the table, has more negotiation room. And these are words like «I’m looking for …» «roughly …», «in the region of …», «around about …», «I’d like …», «I»m hoping for …», «currently …», «right now …», er, «probably». Er, these are words that negotiators spot to help them understand just how movable the other side is. And so language itself is very important and the control of that language; but also the ability to listen. Because the more information you have, the more powerful you become, because information is power.

УрокУрок HomeworkHomework КурсКурс
  • Warm-up
  • Language Review
  • Trade between China and the USA - 1
  • Trade between China and the USA - 2
  • Find the opposites
  • Successful negotiating
  • Steps in a negotiation
  • Selling handbags
  • If, unless, provided
  • Getting into new markets
  • Expert on negotiating
  1. 1. Business|Adults|Intermediate|1. Career moves
  2. 2. Business|Adults|Intermediate|2. Changing jobs
  3. 3. Business|Adults|Intermediate|3. Case study: Recruiting
  4. 4. Business|Adults|Intermediate|4. Describing companies
  5. 5. Business|Adults|Intermediate|5. Making sales
  6. 6. Business|Adults|Intermediate|6. Sales skills
  7. 7. Business|Adults|Intermediate|7. Partnership
  8. 8. Business|Adults|Intermediate|8. Working across the cultures. Revision
  9. 9. Business|Adults|Intermediate|9. New ideas
  10. 10. Business|Adults|Intermediate|10. Successful meetings
  11. 11. Business|Adults|Intermediate|11. Stress in the workplace
  12. 12. Business|Adults|Intermediate|12. Business owners feeling stress
  13. 13. Business|Adults|Intermediate|13. Participating in discussion
  14. 14. Business|Adults|Intermediate|14. Eating and drinking
  15. 15. Business|Adults|Intermediate|15. Corporate entertainment
  16. 16. Business|Adults|Intermediate|16. Organising a conference
  17. 17. Business|Adults|Intermediate|17. Doing business internationally
  18. 18. Business|Adults|Intermediate|18. New business
  19. 19. Business|Adults|Intermediate|19. Business ideas
  20. 20. Business|Adults|Intermediate|20. Suitable location
  21. 21. Business|Adults|Advanced|1. Good communicators
  22. 22. Business|Adults|Advanced|10. Working across cultures
  23. 23. Business|Adults|Advanced|11. What makes people successful
  24. 24. Business|Adults|Advanced|12. The greatest achievements
  25. 25. Business|Adults|Advanced|13. A sponsorship deal
  26. 26. Business|Adults|Advanced|14. Job motivation
  27. 27. Business|Adults|Advanced|15. Job satisfaction
  28. 28. Business|Adults|Advanced|16. Relationships at work
  29. 29. Business|Adults|Advanced|17. Taking risks
  30. 30. Business|Adults|Advanced|4. Marketing and partnerships
  31. 31. Business|Adults|Advanced|18. Insuring trade risk
  32. 32. Business|Adults|Advanced|19. Evaluating risks
  33. 33. Business|Adults|Advanced|2. E-mail: for and against
  34. 34. Business|Adults|Advanced|20. Working across cultures 2
  35. 35. Business|Adults|Advanced|3. The price of success
  36. 36. Business|Adults|Advanced|6. Going global
  37. 37. Business|Adults|Advanced|5. Marketing internationally
  38. 38. Business|Adults|Advanced|7. Describing relations
  39. 39. Business|Adults|Advanced|8. How East is meeting West
  40. 40. Business|Adults|Advanced|9. Building customer loyalty
  41. 41. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|1. Brand management
  42. 42. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|10. Case study 4: Relocation
  43. 43. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|11. Cultural differences
  44. 44. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|12. Case study 5
  45. 45. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|13. Employing the right people
  46. 46. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|14. Case study 6: Fast fitness
  47. 47. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|15. Revision 2
  48. 48. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|16. Free trade
  49. 49. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|17. Training for Negotiating
  50. 50. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|18. Right or Wrong?
  51. 51. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|19. Ethics and Companies
  52. 52. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|2. Building luxury brands
  53. 53. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|20. Revision 3
  54. 54. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|4. What business travellers want
  55. 55. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|3. Case study 1: Hudson Inc.
  56. 56. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|5. Case study 2: Solving problems
  57. 57. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|9. Company structure
  58. 58. GE|Adults|Upper-Int|20. Business and advertising
  59. 59. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|6. Helping companies to change
  60. 60. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|7. Case study 3: Acquisition
  61. 61. Business|Adults|Upper-Intermediate|8. Revision 1: Polite "No"
  62. 62. IELTS|Adults|Advanced|Unit 3|2. Time for a change. Business and marketing