EM|Upper-Int|6. Business model canvas

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  • Can you give a definition of a business plan?
  • Do you remember the definition of a business model?
  • Have you ever written a business plan?
  • Have you ever had to design a business model?

Think about Emma’s question. Then listen to Emma and tick the correct characteristics for each category

A business model and a business plan can be easily confused with each other, but the two notions are different. If we try to make an analogy, then a business model is a foundation, while a business plan is a structure. Basically, a business plan is a document which states what your company does. The business model you choose is included and described in detail in the business plan. So, you see, the two are interdependent and don’t exist without each other.

A business plan describes the future of a business: the people involved and the steps taken to lead the company to success. That’s a tool to attract investors and external resources because a detailed business plan allows those investors to understand your company’s operational and financial goals for the future. It explains how much funding you need, why you need it and, if you ask for a loan, how you plan to repay it. The focus on the future is an important feature of a business plan: usually, a business plan shows where you see your business in three to five years.

A business model, on the other hand, is how and where you run your company: you may choose a franchise, open a brick-and-mortar shop, sell goods or services. Your business model explains how you create value for what you do and how you make money. So, you see the difference: a business plan describes how much profit the business plans to generate in a period of time, while a business model explains how this sum of money will be made.

A business model may change, and if this happens, so must a business plan.


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What is it?

Listen to the audio and choose the correct statements

One of the tools that can be used to analyze, describe and design a business model is the Business Model Canvas. The canvas was created in the 2000s by Alex Osterwalder, a Swiss business theorist, consultant, and entrepreneur, as part of his PhD research. His graduate supervisor was a Belgian computer scientist Yves Pigneur. Together, they wrote a book Business Model Generation elaborating on the Business Model Canvas. In the book, it is stated that the work was co-created by 470 practitioners from 45 countries.

The Business Model Canvas is a visual chart that describes 3 characteristics of a business: feasibility, desirability and viability. These 3 blocks of the Business Model Canvas are divided into 9 elements. Its clear structure helps to illustrate how a company creates, delivers and captures value.

Osterwalder is also a co-founder of strategyzer.com, a software that can help you create a Business Model Canvas online. Alternatively, it can also be done on a sheet of paper.



What does it look like?

Look at the Business Model Canvas and label its parts. Think of what each element could be


Look at the questions each element of the Business Model Canvas answers and think what they are called. Flip the cards to check

1card
partners

 

2card
activities

 

3card
resources

 

4card
value proposition

 

5card
relationships

 

6card
customer segments

 

7card
channels

 

8card
cost structure

 

9card
revenue streams

 

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Do the tasks

Feasibility

Watch the video (00:00–03:00) and choose the correct options to complete the statements

Speaker 1 Speaker 2

S1: Welcome to The Journey. Today we’re talking about what is a business model canvas and why you need one.

S2: If you fail to plan, you’re actually planning to fail. Anyone that has a business has heard this statement before. Now, formal business plans can be complicated and intimidating. A business model canvas can be a visual alternative to understand the different variables you’ll need for your business.

S1: And there are plenty of ways that you can display your business model canvas, whether it’s online or on a large whiteboard. That way, it’s out there in front of you with the outline and you can make adjustments as needed.

S2: Yeah, so we’re actually going to take you through that business model canvas and do a live demo at the same time. Let’s go check it out.

S1: All righty.

S2: All right, so we’re talking through how to create a business model canvas, and we’re actually going to show it to you live. We’re using Strategyzer, we’ll have the link below. But it gives you a free trial to basically create your own business model canvas. So we’re going to show you how to do it for a web design company, but you can really use these points with any industry, any type of business. All right, so we’re in Strategyzer. You can see it’s very visual. You can either do this like Alex was saying, on a whiteboard and map this out, or online, or a Word doc, whatever works best for you. The point is to make it super visual. Starting with key partnerships.

S1: So here’s where you round up your key partners, suppliers, basically the people that you’d be working with.

S2: Yeah, so as a web designer, I would probably put, say, a graphic designer for key elements of my site. And then maybe I have an SEO person because I don’t know SEO all that well. I know the basics, but I hire out to get that professional, so that’s also another key partner I have here. So start to think of all the people that you’re really working with on a day-to-day or a week-by-week basis and add that into this key partnership area.

S1: You can also create a wish list here of things that you want to work with your suppliers on to really gain that business advantage, like costs or distribution.

S2: So next up on our business model canvas is key activities. And this is essentially the services that you’re going to be providing with your business in order for it to operate.

S1: Basically, it’s what you need to do to be a profitable business and make money.

S2: So since I’m a web designer, I obviously design WordPress sites, I sell new maintenance packages, and we’ll keep it simple with that.

S1: Next step is your key resources. So this is basically what you need physically to actually fulfill those key activities.

S2: Yeah, so think about your business. What are the things that you need day to day? Whether you sell products, you might need something to ship them in and a shipping service to go along with that. As a web designer, I’m going to need WordPress as my platform to run on, I need a computer to build on, I need a space to work with. These are all things that I’m going to need to ensure that I have my key activities in order.



Desirability

Watch the video (03:00–06:13) and mark the statements as True or False

Speaker 1 Speaker 2

S1: Next up is your value proposition. So this is basically the building block of your business. What value are you providing to your customers? And so here are some questions to think about whenever you’re trying to decide on your value proposition. Here you wanna ask: «What value are we delivering to our customers?» And also: «Which one of our customer’s problems are we actually trying to help solve?»

S2: Yeah, this is basically the part where you kind of brag about yourself. What makes you unique? Why do people go with you over a competitor? And really just go all out here. So as a web designer, I can really talk about a number of things, but we really want to focus on what I do for my audience. I help create an online presence so they can get new customers. That’s my value proposition. I should probably go a little bit more in-depth but we’re keeping it pretty basic here. You should know your value proposition; why people go with you versus the others. Go ahead and add it right there. So next up, we have customer relationships. This is all about how you communicate with your audience, with your customers on a daily basis. And it can be a number of things, right?

S1: Right, so it’s not just how you are going to keep your current customers, but how you are going to continue growing and acquiring more customers. So one example would be if you’ve done social media campaigns. You know, which ones of those campaigns actually worked really well and connected with your customer base? Things like that are great to think about with this.

S2: Yep, absolutely. So let me go ahead and jot that down. So social media campaigns. If you have a call center, if you’re a larger business or maybe you have chat support directly on your site, email support, whatever that looks like, however you communicate and continue communicating with your audience, go ahead and add that there right in the customer relationship column.

S1: And that’s a great segue ’cause now we’re going to go into customer segments. So this is really where you outline who your ideal customer is, who you’re really trying to reach and connect with. So if you’re a pizza shop in a college town, obviously your demographic is really going to be that college age, maybe people wanting to come in and watch football games or things along those lines.

S2: Yeah, and this is where you really dive into who you’re serving because as we know, you can’t serve everyone. You do not want everyone to be your customer. So the more specific you get, the better it is that your business will grow. So as a web designer, my customer is typically between the ages of 40 and 50 for my business. They are looking to rebuild their site. They had a site built many, many years ago so that’s gonna be my example, looking to rebuild. So who are you trying to serve with your business? Go ahead and add it down in the customer segment and then we’ll move on.

S1: Then diving a little bit deeper into those customer relationships is channels. So these are the specific channels that are really connecting with your audience. Which channels do they prefer to use? Which ones have you used and seen success with?

S2: Yeah, and with these, you want to really jot down the costs associated with it too since not all channels are going to be free. Like social media is a free channel to use, but maybe that chat support software that you use for your business costs $290 a year. You want to really lay that out so you have that foundation of the communication channels you’re going to have with your audience.



Viability

Watch the video (06:13–09:03) and complete the summary with the correct words

Speaker 1 Speaker 2

S1: And speaking of costs, let’s move on to cost structure. So this is where you want to lay out all the different costs that are gonna be associated with your business. So you definitely want to include your fixed and variable costs here as well. We actually just talked about that in a video that you can check out right here of pricing strategies to help you make a profit as a business.

S2: Yeah, and these cost structures will, it’s literally everything you pay for, whether it’s your rent if you have an office location, your hosting, whatever bills that you have in order to maintain and support your business. Go ahead and lay it out all right here. As a web designer, I’m working from home, I’m freelancing, so I don’t have an office. So most of my bills are going to come from like say, hosting, ’cause I gotta host my clients’ websites. Premium plugins to really elevate the sites themselves. SEO optimization because I’m again, I have that SEO professional that’s my key partner. I’m paying him. Optimization, and anything else that you have here, go ahead and add it in here and include the costs associated with each one so you have a visual representation of the bills that you have.

S1: And it’s important to stay updated with those variable costs as well since they are likely to change.

S2: Yeah, it’s like with the premium plugins, I’m not always going to have the same plugins on every site. Some clients may need more, some clients may need less.

S1: And last but certainly not least is revenue streams. So this is the framework of how you’re actually making that money.

S2: Cue the money gun. No money gun? Ah, We lost the budget. But yeah, those revenue streams are all about how you’re going to be paid. So if you’re an online store, that’s basically people coming to your site and buying your products. If you’re a restaurant, it’s people coming to sit down and eating your food. For me as a service-based business, it’s every client that I get on. So you really want to map out how you see how you’re going to get paid, and basically the services associated. So if a basic site, I charge 3350 for a basic site. Add that down. For e-commerce, 6000, for whatever it is. Continue adding those services in so then you can kind of get a ratio of, «Cool, I make this much «from this product but I have all these costs «in my cost structure.» You can start to really map out like how many products or services you need to buy to stay afloat.

S1: Well thanks so much, Nealey, for showing us how to create a business model canvas. That was awesome.

S2: Yeah, and that business model canvas is a constant work in progress. As you progress through your business, you’re going to constantly refer back to it and possibly update and change it as your business grows.

S1: Yeah, and why not create a business model canvas today. All right, well, thanks for watching. Be sure to like, comment, and subscribe to our channel.

S2: While you’re there, ring that bell, so you can see these episodes first. This is The Journey. We’ll see you next time.



Entire video

Imagine you are completing the Business Model Canvas for a web designer. Choose the correct pieces of information for each segment. If needed, watch the video again

Speaker 1 Speaker 2

S1: Welcome to The Journey. Today we’re talking about what is a business model canvas and why you need one.

S2: If you fail to plan, you’re actually planning to fail. Anyone that has a business has heard this statement before. Now, formal business plans can be complicated and intimidating. A business model canvas can be a visual alternative to understand the different variables you’ll need for your business.

S1: And there are plenty of ways that you can display your business model canvas, whether it’s online or on a large whiteboard. That way, it’s out there in front of you with the outline and you can make adjustments as needed.

S2: Yeah, so we’re actually going to take you through that business model canvas and do a live demo at the same time. Let’s go check it out.

S1: All righty.

S2: All right, so we’re talking through how to create a business model canvas, and we’re actually going to show it to you live. We’re using Strategyzer, we’ll have the link below. But it gives you a free trial to basically create your own business model canvas. So we’re going to show you how to do it for a web design company, but you can really use these points with any industry, any type of business. All right, so we’re in Strategyzer. You can see it’s very visual. You can either do this like Alex was saying, on a whiteboard and map this out, or online, or a Word doc, whatever works best for you. The point is to make it super visual. Starting with key partnerships.

S1: So here’s where you round up your key partners, suppliers, basically the people that you’d be working with.

S2: Yeah, so as a web designer, I would probably put, say, a graphic designer for key elements of my site. And then maybe I have an SEO person because I don’t know SEO all that well. I know the basics, but I hire out to get that professional, so that’s also another key partner I have here. So start to think of all the people that you’re really working with on a day-to-day or a week-by-week basis and add that into this key partnership area.

S1: You can also create a wish list here of things that you want to work with your suppliers on to really gain that business advantage, like costs or distribution.

S2: So next up on our business model canvas is key activities. And this is essentially the services that you’re going to be providing with your business in order for it to operate.

S1: Basically, it’s what you need to do to be a profitable business and make money.

S2: So since I’m a web designer, I obviously design WordPress sites, I sell new maintenance packages, and we’ll keep it simple with that.

S1: Next step is your key resources. So this is basically what you need physically to actually fulfill those key activities.

S2: Yeah, so think about your business. What are the things that you need day to day? Whether you sell products, you might need something to ship them in and a shipping service to go along with that. As a web designer, I’m going to need WordPress as my platform to run on, I need a computer to build on, I need a space to work with. These are all things that I’m going to need to ensure that I have my key activities in order.

S1: Next up is your value proposition. So this is basically the building block of your business. What value are you providing to your customers? And so here are some questions to think about whenever you’re trying to decide on your value proposition. Here you wanna ask: «What value are we delivering to our customers?» And also: «Which one of our customer’s problems are we actually trying to help solve?»

S2: Yeah, this is basically the part where you kind of brag about yourself. What makes you unique? Why do people go with you over a competitor? And really just go all out here. So as a web designer, I can really talk about a number of things, but we really want to focus on what I do for my audience. I help create an online presence so they can get new customers. That’s my value proposition. I should probably go a little bit more in-depth but we’re keeping it pretty basic here. You should know your value proposition; why people go with you versus the others. Go ahead and add it right there. So next up, we have customer relationships. This is all about how you communicate with your audience, with your customers on a daily basis. And it can be a number of things, right?

S1: Right, so it’s not just how you are going to keep your current customers, but how you are going to continue growing and acquiring more customers. So one example would be if you’ve done social media campaigns. You know, which ones of those campaigns actually worked really well and connected with your customer base? Things like that are great to think about with this.

S2: Yep, absolutely. So let me go ahead and jot that down. So social media campaigns. If you have a call center, if you’re a larger business or maybe you have chat support directly on your site, email support, whatever that looks like, however you communicate and continue communicating with your audience, go ahead and add that there right in the customer relationship column.

S1: And that’s a great segue ’cause now we’re going to go into customer segments. So this is really where you outline who your ideal customer is, who you’re really trying to reach and connect with. So if you’re a pizza shop in a college town, obviously your demographic is really going to be that college age, maybe people wanting to come in and watch football games or things along those lines.

S2: Yeah, and this is where you really dive into who you’re serving because as we know, you can’t serve everyone. You do not want everyone to be your customer. So the more specific you get, the better it is that your business will grow. So as a web designer, my customer is typically between the ages of 40 and 50 for my business. They are looking to rebuild their site. They had a site built many, many years ago so that’s gonna be my example, looking to rebuild. So who are you trying to serve with your business? Go ahead and add it down in the customer segment and then we’ll move on.

S1: Then diving a little bit deeper into those customer relationships is channels. So these are the specific channels that are really connecting with your audience. Which channels do they prefer to use? Which ones have you used and seen success with?

S2: Yeah, and with these, you want to really jot down the costs associated with it too since not all channels are going to be free. Like social media is a free channel to use, but maybe that chat support software that you use for your business costs $290 a year. You want to really lay that out so you have that foundation of the communication channels you’re going to have with your audience.

S1: And speaking of costs, let’s move on to cost structure. So this is where you want to lay out all the different costs that are gonna be associated with your business. So you definitely want to include your fixed and variable costs here as well. We actually just talked about that in a video that you can check out right here of pricing strategies to help you make a profit as a business.

S2: Yeah, and these cost structures will, it’s literally everything you pay for, whether it’s your rent if you have an office location, your hosting, whatever bills that you have in order to maintain and support your business. Go ahead and lay it out all right here. As a web designer, I’m working from home, I’m freelancing, so I don’t have an office. So most of my bills are going to come from like say, hosting, ’cause I gotta host my clients’ websites. Premium plugins to really elevate the sites themselves. SEO optimization because I’m again, I have that SEO professional that’s my key partner. I’m paying him. Optimization, and anything else that you have here, go ahead and add it in here and include the costs associated with each one so you have a visual representation of the bills that you have.

S1: And it’s important to stay updated with those variable costs as well since they are likely to change.

S2: Yeah, it’s like with the premium plugins, I’m not always going to have the same plugins on every site. Some clients may need more, some clients may need less.

S1: And last but certainly not least is revenue streams. So this is the framework of how you’re actually making that money.

S2: Cue the money gun. No money gun? Ah, We lost the budget. But yeah, those revenue streams are all about how you’re going to be paid. So if you’re an online store, that’s basically people coming to your site and buying your products. If you’re a restaurant, it’s people coming to sit down and eating your food. For me as a service-based business, it’s every client that I get on. So you really want to map out how you see how you’re going to get paid, and basically the services associated. So if a basic site, I charge 3350 for a basic site. Add that down. For e-commerce, 6000, for whatever it is. Continue adding those services in so then you can kind of get a ratio of, «Cool, I make this much «from this product but I have all these costs «in my cost structure.» You can start to really map out like how many products or services you need to buy to stay afloat.

S1: Well thanks so much, Nealey, for showing us how to create a business model canvas. That was awesome.

S2: Yeah, and that business model canvas is a constant work in progress. As you progress through your business, you’re going to constantly refer back to it and possibly update and change it as your business grows.

S1: Yeah, and why not create a business model canvas today. All right, well, thanks for watching. Be sure to like, comment, and subscribe to our channel.

S2: While you’re there, ring that bell, so you can see these episodes first. This is The Journey. We’ll see you next time.


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Do the tasks

First block

Listen to an expert talking about the first block of the Business Model Canvas and complete the description

Host Daniel

Host: Welcome to our weekly business podcast. Many of our listeners have asked us to talk in detail about a popular tool for business models, the Business Model Canvas. So today, our guest Daniel Warren is going to provide his expertise. Thanks for joining us, Daniel.
Daniel: You are always welcome.
Host: So, the Business Model Canvas is divided into 9 parts, and our listeners want to better understand each of them. Of course, the process of completing this canvas would be different for different companies, but there are also certain general points we can discuss. Generally speaking, how can a business choose the right partners?
Daniel: Basically, there are four types of partnerships, and to choose the right one, a company has to clearly understand the reason why it needs partners. If the company wants to allocate its resources and activities in an optimal way, it can choose buyer-supplier relationships. In this case, the company doesn’t have to do everything by itself. Another type of partnership is cooperation with the competitors. For example, different competing companies may collaborate to create new technology, but then sell the products themselves. This kind of partnership suits companies that want to reduce risk in a competitive environment. There is also cooperation with non-competitors, which helps companies get the necessary resources or expertise from each other. For example, Starbucks and the American bookstore chain Barnes & Noble are not competitors, right? Starbucks came up with a great idea to have their coffee shops in Barnes & Noble stores. Choosing a book is definitely much more pleasant when you can have a coffee break. So, this partnership is profitable for both companies. And finally, one more type of partnership is a joint venture, when two or more enterprises create one business. Such partnership helps to access new markets.
Host: And what about key activities? Can they also be divided into categories?
Daniel: Yes, I’d divide them into three groups. The first one is production: all the activities related to creating and designing new products. This type refers mostly to manufacturers. Another group is problem-solving, which includes activities related to providing customers with solutions to their problems. And there’s one more: let’s call it a platform. For instance, if a company has a platform, as is the case for Amazon or eBay, then it requires some extra activities: maintaining the platform, ensuring the safety of its users and so on.
Host: And what key resources would any company have?
Daniel: A company has physical resources, which includes facilities, buildings, machines; intellectual resources — brands, copyrights, customer databases; human resources — its employees; and financial resources, which can take different forms — cash or loans, for example.



Second block

Try to answer the questions in your own words and using your own ideas


Now listen and complete the sentences with the given words

Host Expert

Host: Let’s now talk about the value proposition, which is actually the reason why customers prefer a particular company to their competitors. Can you give any examples of what a value proposition could be?
Expert: Sure, I’ll give some examples, but keep in mind, there are many more cases, especially since each company has to try and create its own unique value proposition. So, for some companies, their value proposition is newness — they offer their customers something that no one has ever offered. Others focus on performance, for instance, computer companies try to bring more and more powerful computers to the market. Customization is another example — certain companies create products and services to satisfy the specific needs of their customers. What else? Convenience — we want to get things that make our life easier and more comfortable. Or just the brand itself. Some people buy certain goods just because they value the brand and want to have it.
Host: What kind of customer relationships can a company establish?
Expert: It can be personal assistance when a customer communicates with a real person, or self-service with no direct contact. It can also be co-creation. For example, on YouTube, there are users who create content for other users.
Host: Should companies always segment their customers?
Expert: Well, if a company doesn’t target any specific group of customers, it just has a mass-market business model. On the contrary, if it serves a very specific segment, that’s a niche market business model. But if the company has customers with different needs, it has to segment them, and that’ll be a segmented business model.
Host: What are the channels through which companies can reach their customers?
Expert: Companies can reach their customers through their own channels, such as their own websites or stores; partner channels like a partner’s website or a retail store; or it can be a mix of both.



Third block

Listen to an expert talking about the third block of the Business Model Canvas and choose the correct options to complete the statements

Host Expert

Host: What can you say about the cost structure?
Expert: If we talk about the cost structure, we have to consider that there are two types of companies. One is cost-driven, which means the company tries to minimize costs whenever possible. The majority of the businesses would try to do this. Another type is value-driven companies, which focus on value creation. A luxury hotel, for instance, is an example of the latter.
Host: And the last question: what revenue streams can a business have?
Expert: A classic example of a revenue stream is, of course, sale. You sell a product and get money for it. If we talk about a service, the revenue stream is a usage fee or a subscription fee, in the case of a subscription service. For some companies, it’s not selling, but renting or leasing. Another revenue stream is licensing: the company gives its customers permission to use the protected intellectual property and gets licensing fees for it. Advertising is another revenue stream. There are surely more but well, these are the major ones.


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Using your own ideas, complete the elements of the Business Model Canvas for Uber

Key partners
Key activities
Key resources
Value proposition
Customer relationships
Customer segments
Channels
Cost structure
Revenue streams

Watch the video and compare the information with your guesses in Exercise 1. Then answer the questions below

Hi, this is Dennis from Business Model Guru. Today I’m having a look at the Uber business model and we put it onto the Business Model Canvas here for you to have a quick look at. Okay, so customer segments. Uber has two main customer segments: the passengers, the people who want rides, and the drivers who give them rides. Unlike normal taxi company, the drivers are self-employed: uber does not employ them directly; it’s just matchmaking between drivers and passengers. Now the value proposition is very much… Uber promises to give passengers a taxi when they need it; it promises drivers that they will get them customers when they need it. This is quite different from the old taxi operation where supply and demand are quite disjointed because the system can’t respond flexibly enough to the current market situations. If Uber is able to do that within minutes or seconds given its technological base, it also makes it easy for people to make additional money; it’s cash-free, lots of small ancillary value benefits. Customer relationship: at essence, they’re super automated; it’s possible to use Uber for years and never talk to an Uber employee. Channels: principally, you use Uber through the mobile app, pretty much no other way of doing it, and then it reaches people through the app, through email marketing, through the social media and, above all, through earned media, through its PR, through people talking about it and, of course, through word-of-mouth. The key resources for Uber are the platform, the technology, the app that enables drivers and passengers to communicate very very easily with each other and then the two key parts of that technology are the pricing out algorithm which matches supply and demand and then adjusts it through the pricing so that it comes into balance as quickly as it’s possible to do and then the routing which gets the closest cab to the passenger as quickly as possible and then reduces the journey time. The partners: the drivers obviously own their cars, replacing the taxi driver companies, and Uber shifts off a lot of cost and resort arm and resource issues onto those drivers and have the payment processes and one of the key things that’s often overlooked is the local authorities who, in the long term, Uber needs to to find a good modus operandi to work with and work at what is the balance of licensing and freedom to do the business and give value to paying passengers. The revenue is a very standard taxi-based system: you pay for how long you’re riding, how long you’re actually using the taxi. And then, finally, on the cost structure, the huge costs are in the platform development. Yeah, these are huge, but they are amortized over so many thousands hundreds of thousand millions of rides. I think it’s almost a billion rides now in January 2016, so these huge costs mean that a very small charge is put onto each ride and that means super pricing is very cost-effective. Thank you very much for listening. Do have a look at the rest of the website and if you like the work that we do, do ask us to do your business model for you.


1. What points in your version of the Uber Business Model Canvas are the same as in the video?

2. What points are different? Why do you think you haven’t included these points?

3. Are there any points on which you don’t agree with the author?

4. What has surprised you in his version of the Business Model Canvas?

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You’ve seen some examples of completing the Business Model Canvas, and now it’s time to do it by yourself.

Read the task and prepare your 3-minute speech

Remember the task that Max had to do? Well, now it’s your turn! Think of a company and design a business model for it by completing the Business Model Canvas. Follow the steps:

  • Choose a company you’d like to talk about.
  • Choose a way of completing the canvas: online on 🔗Strategyzer, in a 🔗PDF, or in any program you want, like Word or Excel.
  • Complete the canvas. Use some of the words and phrases from the wordlist.
  • Once you are done, make a screenshot of the completed canvas and paste the link to it into the text area. You can also use the text area for taking notes.

1. variable

2. outline

3. acquire

4. competitor

5. joint venture

6. newness

7. customize

8. convenience

9. segment

10. niche marketing

11. channel

Allow your browser access to your microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

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Choose the correct statements


1. variable

2. outline

3. acquire

4. competitor

5. joint venture

6. newness

7. customize

8. convenience

9. segment

10. niche marketing

11. channel


  • a revenue stream
  • the cost structure
  • licensing

Урок Homework Курс
  • Not a business plan
  • A special tool
  • The BM Canvas in action
  • Detailing the segments
  • Uber
  • Using the canvas
  • Assess your progress