GE|Adults|Upper-Int|4. Sleepwalkers

pic1_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Answer the questions

1. Do you often remember your dreams? Can you remember the most vivid dream you’ve ever had?

2. Do you talk when you sleep?

3. Have you ever walked in your sleep? Do you know anyone who does?

pic2_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Complete the sentences with the correct words from the box


  • duvet [‘djuːveɪ]
  • insomnia [ɪn’sɔmnɪə]

pic3_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Answer the questions

  1. Have you ever stayed up all night?
  2. Do you take or have you ever taken sleeping pills? Did they work?
  3. Do you often have nightmares or recurring dreams?
  4. Do you sometimes have problems getting to sleep? What do you do?
  5. Is there any food or drink that keeps you awake, or that stops you from sleeping well?
  6. Have you ever fallen asleep at an embarrassing moment, for example during a class?
  7. Have you ever sleepwalked or do you know anyone who sleepwalks?
  8. Do you sleep with a duvet or blankets? How many pillows do you like to have?
  9. Do you snore? Have you ever had to share a room with someone who snores? Was this a problem?
  10. Have you ever overslept and missed something important?
  11. Are you a light sleeper or do you sleep like a log?
  12. Have you ever been jet-lagged? Where were you going? How long did it take you to recover?
  13. Do you remember a time or place where you slept very badly? Why?

  • building site — an area of land on which a building or a group of buildings is in the process of being built or altered
  • to crawl [krɔːl] — to move forward on your hands and knees
  • safety harness — a system of belts or restraints to hold a person to prevent falling or injury
  • ladder — a piece of equipment used for climbing up something or down from something. It consists of two long pieces of wood, metal, or rope with steps fixed between them
  • crane — a large machine that moves heavy things by lifting them in the air
  • passer-by — a person who is walking past someone or something
  • fire brigade — an organized body of people trained and employed to extinguish fires
  • the arm of the crane — a long part of a crane that sticks out from the main part and holds heavy things
  • security guard — a person employed to protect a building against intruders or damage


pic5_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Listen to the news programme and correct the mistakes in the text

And finally on News Today the amazing story of a teenager who woke up this morning and discovered that she wasn’t in bed — she was lying on top of a 40-metre-high crane! In the early hours of this morning a man on his way to work was passing a building site in Dulwich, south-east London when he spotted the 15-year-old girl lying on the arm of the crane. He immediately called the police on his mobile phone. The police and fire brigade arrived on the scene at 1.30 and at first they were worried that the girl might be intending to commit suicide by throwing herself off the crane. But when a fireman climbed up the crane, he could see that the girl was asleep. The fireman realized that it could be very dangerous if the girl woke up suddenly. So he crawled along the 21-metre arm of the crane and carefully wrapped the girl in a safety harness before waking her up gently. The girl had a mobile phone with her and the fireman was able to call her parents, who came to the building site straight away. Finally, the girl was brought down from the crane on a ladder. The whole rescue operation had taken two and a half hours. Her parents were waiting for her on the ground and obviously they were very relieved to see her safe and well. The question everyone wanted to know was «why did the girl go to sleep on the top of a crane?» Well, the answer is that she had been sleepwalking! She had walked out of her house during the night without her parents noticing and sleepwalked to the building site. There was a security guard, but he didn’t see her climbing the crane because he was watching TV. The girl’s parents told the police that this wasn’t the first time that she had sleepwalked, but that she had never left the house before.

pic6_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Listen and mark the sentences as True or False. If a statement is False, be ready to provide the explanation

Presenter: Now I imagine some of you are finding this story a bit difficult to believe,
Presenter: so I’ve invited into the studio Professor Miller,
Presenter: who is an expert in sleepwalking.
Presenter: Professor Miller, does this story surprise you?
Professor: Not at all.
Professor: I have treated people who have driven cars,
Professor: ridden horses, and I had one man who even tried to fly a helicopter
Professor: while he was asleep.
Presenter: But how did this girl manage to climb a 40-metre crane?
Professor: It would have been no problem for her.
Professor: She would climb the crane just as easily
Professor: as if she were awake.
Presenter: And would her eyes have been open?
Professor: Yes, sleepwalkers usually have their eyes open.
Professor: That’s why sometimes it’s difficult to know
Professor: if someone is sleepwalking or not.
Presenter: Is sleepwalking very common?
Professor: Yes.
Professor: Research shows that about 18% of the population have a tendency to sleepwalk.
Professor: In fact, it’s much more common in children
Professor: than in teenagers or adults.
Professor: And curiously it’s more common among boys than girls.
Professor: Adults who sleepwalk are normally
Professor: people who used to sleepwalk when they were children.
Professor: Adult sleepwalking often happens after a stressful event,
Professor: for example, after a road accident.
Presenter: People always say that you should never wake a sleepwalker up
Presenter: when they’re walking.
Presenter: Is that true?
Professor: No, it isn’t.
Professor: People used to think that it was dangerous to wake up a sleepwalker.
Professor: But in fact this isn’t the case.
Professor: You can wake a sleepwalker up without any problem,
Professor: although if you do,
Professor: it is quite common for the sleepwalker to be confused,
Professor: so he or she probably won’t know where they are
Professor: for a few moments.
Presenter: So if we see someone sleepwalking,
Presenter: should we wake them up?
Professor: Yes, you should remember that another of the myths about sleepwalkers
Professor: is that they cannot injure themselves while they are sleepwalking.
Professor: But this isn’t true.
Professor: If a sleepwalker is walking around the house,
Professor: they can trip or fall over a chair or even fall down stairs.
Professor: The other day there was a case of a nine-year-old girl
Professor: who opened her bedroom window while sleepwalking
Professor: and fell ten metres to the ground.
Professor: Luckily, she wasn’t seriously injured.
Professor: So you see it is definitely safer to wake a sleepwalker up.
Presenter: How long does sleepwalking last?
Professor: It can be very brief,
Professor: for example, a few minutes.
Professor: The most typical cases are people getting up and getting dressed,
Professor: or people going to the bathroom.
Professor: But it can occasionally last much longer,
Professor: maybe half an hour or even more.
Presenter: And what happens when sleepwalkers wake up?
Presenter: Do they remember the things they did while they were sleepwalking?
Professor: No, a sleepwalker usually doesn’t remember anything afterwards.
Professor: So, for example, the girl who climbed up the crane
Professor: will probably have no memory of the incident.
Presenter: So, is a sleepwalker responsible for his or her actions?
Professor: A very good question, actually.
Professor: A few years ago a man from Canada got up in the middle of the night
Professor: and drove 20 kilometres from his home to the house
Professor: where his parents-in-law lived and,
Professor: for no apparent reason, he killed his mother-in-law.
Professor: The man was charged with murder
Professor: but he was found not guilty
Professor: because he had been asleep at the time he committed the crime.

pic12_GE|Upper-Int|L3


Build questions and answer them

Example: Do you usually celebrate your birthday?

  1. (cheat) in exams?
  2. (download) films from the Internet?
  3. (drive) on the left?
  4. (fight) with your brothers and sisters when you were little?
  5. (get up) as soon as you wake up?
  6. (go) to the hairdresser’s more than once a month?
  7. (live) without credit cards?
  8. (have) a favourite TV programme when you were a child?
  9. (keep) a diary when you were younger?
  10. (have) lunch at home?
  11. (not have) Internet access?

pic7_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Choose a suitable option and answer the questions

  1. Do you manage to sleep as much as you need? If not, why not?
  2. Have you ever suffered from insomnia?
  3. Do you use, or have you ever used, any special methods that help you get to sleep? What about taking sleeping tablets?
  4. What helps to keep you awake if you need to stay up late?
  5. Have you ever suffered from jet lag?
  6. Do you fall asleep while watching the TV or reading?
  7. Having a nap is a good opportunity to recharge your batteries. Do you agree? Why?
  8. Do you always sleep like a log?
  9. When do people usually yawn? Have you ever yawned in an awkward moment?

  1. Have you ever suffered from insomnia?
  2. What keeps you awake at night? (e.g. worrying too much about stuff, too much coffee, your partner’s snoring, your neighbors’ parties, an uncomfortable bed, a hot summer)
  3. Do you suffer from nightmares? Can you remember any specific nightmare?
  4. What helps to keep you awake if you need to stay up late?
  5. Have you ever suffered from jet lag?
  6. Having a nap is a good opportunity to recharge your batteries. Do you agree? Why?
  7. When do people usually yawn? Have you ever yawned in an awkward moment?
  8. Do you always sleep like a log?
  9. What’s the longest you’ve gone without sleep? Why? How did you feel?

Listen and repeat the sentences. Write a dictation

pic8_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Complete the sentences with a word connected to sleep

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Match the words with their definitions

pic10_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Write the words

Read the article and answer the question

pic11_GE|Upper-Int|L4



How to deal with a sleep-talking husband

Most women would find it infuriating to be woken up night after night by their husband talking in his sleep. But one woman in the UK has found an interesting way of dealing with the problem. … And then she posts them on the internet.

36-year-old Karen Slavick Lennard is a web-products manager, and she’s married to Adam, an advertising account director, also 36. They live together in Richmond, in south-west London. Karen first typed Adam’s lines in on her laptop, but now she uses a voice-activated recorder. «I find every single thing Adam says hilarious,» she says, «I cannot believe what he comes out with, and neither can he. We laugh like crazy every morning.» … Then he suddenly stops.

Adam talks about everything and anything in his sleep; from vampire penguins to zombie guinea pigs. Examples of the things he has said in a typical week include, from Tuesday night: «Pork chops are the most satisfying. Mmmmmmm. Dangle them from the ceiling.» … And then on Sunday at 5 a.m., he mumbled: «Your mum’s at the door. Bury me deep. Bury me deep.» Another of his most memorable comments is: «Shhhhhh. Shhhhhh. I’m telling you: your voice, my ears. A bad combination.»

Adam was gobsmacked when he first heard the strange statements recorded by his wife. «I have no recollection of the absurd things I say,» he explains. «They are not things that I would ever say or that any normal person would ever say.» At first, Adam was put out by the recordings and he refused to listen to them, but later he realized that they were quite fun. «It was just my subconscious fully uninhibited and running riot,» he says. … And both he and his wife look forward to listening to the tapes in the morning.

In fact, Karen and Adam are not the only ones who find Adam’s outbursts entertaining. … The couple have now started selling T-shirts and bags printed with Adam’s comments on the site. The most popular among them are products featuring this one: «Don’t leave the duck there. It’s totally irresponsible.»


Read the text again and complete it with the missing sentences. There is one extra sentence you do not need to use.

  1. Ironically, Adam has never eaten them in his life.
  2. Karen’s blog, Sleep Talkin’ Man, has become an internet hit in more than fifty countries.
  3. Instead of investing in earplugs, she records her husband’s comments.
  4. He went there once as a child, but he doesn’t remember it.
  5. He thinks that his sleep-talking might be some sort of therapeutic process, because he always wakes up fully refreshed and relaxed.
  6. Karen says that Adam doesn’t talk every night, but when he does, it happens every thirty seconds or few minutes.

pic7_GE|Upper-Int|L3


Match the words and phrases from the text with their definitions

Listen to a radio programme about sleep therapy and answer the questions

pic12_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Presenter | Nick

Presenter: Hello and welcome to today’s programme
Presenter: where we’re going to look at a surprising new trend —
Presenter: sleep therapy.
Presenter: Journalist Nick Parker has been investigating.
Presenter: Nick what exactly is sleep therapy?
Nick: Scientists who have been studying sleep
Nick: have found that people who don’t get enough sleep
Nick: are less efficient at work and more likely to take time off sick.
Nick: So sleep therapy is something that has evolved to help these people
Nick: who are sleep deprived by offering them the opportunity
Nick: to get some extra rest.
Nick: The places which are offering sleep therapy are mainly spas,
Nick: and in many big cities worldwide they’ve opened special «sleep spas».
Nick: These are places where stressed business executives can have a nap
Nick: whenever they need one.
Nick: There are two very well-known sleep spa chains in New York,
Nick: one called Yelo and one called Metronaps,
Nick: but more sleep spas are opening all the time.
Presenter: So what happens when you go to one of these spas?
Nick: Well, in Yelo you’re taken to a private little space called a «pod».
Nick: The pod is hexagonal,
Nick: I mean it’s got six sides,
Nick: and it contains a very comfortable leather reclining chair and a blanket,
Nick: and the lighting is really soft,
Nick: to encourage you to relax.
Nick: Metronaps is quite similar but you lie in a chair
Nick: which has a sort of spherical hood a bit like what they have in hairdressers’.
Nick: So in both places you can have a comfortable nap in total privacy.
Presenter: How long do people usually spend in these sleep spas?
Nick: Well, in both Yelo and Metronaps a session lasts twenty minutes,
Nick: but of course you can book more than one
Nick: if you think you need it.
Presenter: Is it expensive?
Presenter: Do you know how much a session costs?
Nick: It’s somewhere between 12 and 15 dollars a session.


  1. What are Yelo and Metronaps?
  2. What kind of people use them?

Listen again and complete the notes on sleep therapy. You have to write one word in each box.

Presenter | Nick

Presenter: Hello and welcome to today’s programme
Presenter: where we’re going to look at a surprising new trend —
Presenter: sleep therapy.
Presenter: Journalist Nick Parker has been investigating.
Presenter: Nick what exactly is sleep therapy?
Nick: Scientists who have been studying sleep
Nick: have found that people who don’t get enough sleep
Nick: are less efficient at work and more likely to take time off sick.
Nick: So sleep therapy is something that has evolved to help these people
Nick: who are sleep deprived by offering them the opportunity
Nick: to get some extra rest.
Nick: The places which are offering sleep therapy are mainly spas,
Nick: and in many big cities worldwide they’ve opened special «sleep spas».
Nick: These are places where stressed business executives can have a nap
Nick: whenever they need one.
Nick: There are two very well-known sleep spa chains in New York,
Nick: one called Yelo and one called Metronaps,
Nick: but more sleep spas are opening all the time.
Presenter: So what happens when you go to one of these spas?
Nick: Well, in Yelo you’re taken to a private little space called a «pod».
Nick: The pod is hexagonal,
Nick: I mean it’s got six sides,
Nick: and it contains a very comfortable leather reclining chair and a blanket,
Nick: and the lighting is really soft,
Nick: to encourage you to relax.
Nick: Metronaps is quite similar but you lie in a chair
Nick: which has a sort of spherical hood a bit like what they have in hairdressers’.
Nick: So in both places you can have a comfortable nap in total privacy.
Presenter: How long do people usually spend in these sleep spas?
Nick: Well, in both Yelo and Metronaps a session lasts twenty minutes,
Nick: but of course you can book more than one
Nick: if you think you need it.
Presenter: Is it expensive?
Presenter: Do you know how much a session costs?
Nick: It’s somewhere between 12 and 15 dollars a session.


Listen again with the tapescript and look at the highlighted words and phrases. Use your dictionary to look up their meaning and pronunciation. Do the task below.

pic13_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Presenter | Nick

P: Hello and welcome to today’s programme where we’re going to look at a surprising new trend — sleep therapy. Journalist Nick Parker has been investigating. Nick what exactly is sleep therapy?

N: Scientists who have been studying sleep have found that people who don’t get enough sleep are less efficient at work and more likely to take time off sick. So sleep therapy is something that has evolved to help these people who are sleep deprived by offering them the opportunity to get some extra rest. The places which are offering sleep therapy are mainly spas, and in many big cities worldwide they’ve opened special «sleep spas». These are places where stressed business executives can have a nap whenever they need one. There are two very well-known sleep spa chains in New York, one called Yelo and one called Metronaps, but more sleep spas are opening all the time.

P: So what happens when you go to one of these spas?

N: Well, in Yelo you’re taken to a private little space called a «pod». The pod is hexagonal, I mean it’s got six sides, and it contains a very comfortable leather reclining chair and a blanket, and the lighting is really soft, to encourage you to relax. Metronaps is quite similar but you lie in a chair which has a sort of spherical hood a bit like what they have in hairdressers’. So in both places you can have a comfortable nap in total privacy.

P: How long do people usually spend in these sleep spas?

N: Well, in both Yelo and Metronaps a session lasts twenty minutes, but of course you can book more than one if you think you need it.

P: Is it expensive? Do you know how much a session costs?

N: It’s somewhere between 12 and 15 dollars a session.


Match the highlighted words and phrases and match them with their meaning

Read the task and prepare your 3-minute speech on the following topic «Sleep»

pic14_GE|Upper-Int|L4


Cover the points:

  1. Why is it important to sleep?
  2. Do you think that we can learn anything from dreams? Some people claim that we can learn things about the future from dreams. What do you think about this idea?
  3. Do you have any techniques to help you to get to sleep if you have trouble falling asleep? Is taking sleeping pills a good idea? Why?
  4. How many hours of sleep do you normally have? How do you feel if you don’t get your expected amount? What’s the longest you’ve gone without sleep? Why? How did you feel?
  5. Have you ever overslept and missed something important? How did it happen?

Allow your browser access to your microphone, press the button «Click to Record» and record the speech you have prepared

Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Dreams
  • Sleep questionnaire
  • Asleep on a crane
  • Sleepwalkers
  • Did you use to...?
  • Dreams and nightmares
  • Dream words
  • Sleep
  • Sleep words
  • Sleep-talking
  • Words, words
  • Sleep therapy
  • More details
  • Sleep