IELTS|Intermediate|12. Different ways

pic1_IELTS|Int|L12Discuss the questions

1. How do you get to your work/college/university/school?

2. How long is your journey?

3. How far do you have to travel?

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Look at the writing task and answer the questions below

Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

average distance (miles) average time (minutes) average distance (mph)
car (1 person) 17 33 31
car (more than 1 person) 24 42 34
cycle/walk 4 20 10 (cycle)

3 (walk)

train/bus 23 49 28

Which ways of travelling

  1. do people use for the longest journeys?
  2. do people use for the shortest journeys?
  3. take the most/least time?
  4. are fastest/slowest?

Complete the table

Making comparisons

We can compare information using comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs.

  • We use comparative adjectives (+ than) to compare people, things, places or events:
    Bicycles are quieter than cars.
  • We use comparative adverbs (+ than) to compare actions:
    You can get to work more quickly by car than by bus.
  • We use the + a superlative adjective or adverb to compare one person or thing with everyone everything else in the group:
    I find trains the most comfortable means of transport.

Forming comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs

We add -er and -est to:

  • one-syllable adjectives: slower (than), the fastest
  • two-syllable adjectives ending in -y (note that the -y changes to i): easier (than), the happiest
  • one-syllable adverbs: faster (than), the hardest

We add more and most to:

  • adjectives with two or more syllables (except two-syllable adjectives ending in -y — see above): more efficient (than), the most complicated
  • adverbs with two or more syllables: more easily (than), the most dangerously

Some adjectives have irregular comparative and superlative forms:

  • good, better, best
  • bad, worse, worst
  • far, farther/further, farthest/furthest
  • many, more, most
  • much, more, most
  • little, less, least

Some adverbs have irregular comparative and superlative forms:

  • badly worse, worst
  • well, better, best

To say one thing is less than another, use less and least before the adjective or adverb:

  • Travelling by plane is less dangerous than travelling by car.

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Complete the sentences by putting the adjective or adverb into correct form


Farther and further both mean at a greater distance, and they are used interchangeably in this sense.

In the United States, though, farther is more often used to refer to physical distances, and further more often refers to figurative and nonphysical distances.

For example, we might say that one mountain is farther away than another, while we might say the price of a stock (a nonphysical thing) fell further today than yesterday. This is not a rule, however, and further is often used for physical distances.

The distinction does not exist in the U.K. and elsewhere in the (British) Commonwealth of Nations, where further is preferred for all senses of the word and farther is rare.

Make up a comparative degree for each adjective or adverb

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Find and correct the spelling mistakes in the sentences


Spelling changes when adding -er and -est to adjectives

We double the final consonant when we add -er and -est to adjectives which end in consonant-vowel-consonant: thin, thinner, thinnest.

We don’t double the final consonant when:

  • there are two final consonants: old, older, oldest
  • there are two vowels before the final consonant: clear, clearer, clearest
  • the adjective ends in a vowel: safe, safer, safest
  • the adjective ends in -w or -x: slow, slower, slowest

Change a final -y to -i: funny, funnier, funniest.

Complete the sample answer to the Writing task by writing the correct form of the adjective in each gap

average distance (miles) average time (minutes) average distance (mph)
car (1 person) 17 33 31
car (more than 1 person) 24 42 34
cycle/walk 4 20 10 (cycle)

3 (walk)

train/bus 23 49 28


Divide the sample answer into five paragraphs. Match the paragraphs with their purpose

Although at this level IELTS candidates are not expected to be able to divide their summaries into paragraphs, they will raise their score if they can organise the information logically and structure their writing. Using paragraphs helps to do this.

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Look at the writing task and answer the questions

Writing Task 1 will contain information in two different forms (e.g., here a table and a bar chart) and the student will have to find the relationshipbetween the information from the two sources in order to write their summary.

The candidate should look at:

  • what type of information is being shown;
  • maximums and minimums in the table and the chart;
  • any relationships between maximums and minimums.

It’s important to include an overview of the information. Look at the table and chart to see where the information in this overview is shown.

% of travellers per form of transport average age of traveller
car (1 person) 48 43
car (more than 1 person) 11 44
cycle/walk 4 39
train/bus 37 47

CO2 emissions from different forms of transport

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  1. What does the table show?
  2. Which is the most common means of transport?
  3. Which is the least common?
  4. Which group of travellers has the highest average age?
  5. Which group of travellers has the lowest average age?
  6. What does the chart show?
  7. Which forms of transport cause little or no pollution?
  8. Which form of transport causes the most pollution?

Read the sentence giving an overview of the information and choose the correct options

Answer the questions and explain your answers

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Put the flow of the table description into correct order


Exam advice

Writing Task 1

  • Think about and analyse the information in the chart(s) and table(s) before you write.
  • Organise the information into paragraphs and include a general overview.
  • Make sure that you compare information in the chart(s) and table(s).

Write notes for your future description of the table in the textarea and discuss them with your teacher

The table and the bar chart below give information about travelling to work in Houston, Texas. Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

% of travellers per form of transport average age of traveller
car (1 person) 48 43
car (more than 1 person) 11 44
cycle/walk 4 39
train/bus 37 47

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If you open the lesson plan you will be able to assign separate pages as homework or all the homework pages at once.

Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Lead-in
  • Comparing things
  • Spelling comparatives well
  • Example table description
  • Planning your answer
  • Check what you remember
  • Describe a table
  • Homework