IELTS|Intermediate|19. Animals in our life

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Distribute fauna representatives into species they belong to

Use 🔗Page Marker to complete this task

Table1.1_IELTS|Int|L19

 

 

  1. Did you enjoy studying zoology at school?
  2. What species of animals and birds live in your country?
  3. What animals do you have to deal with in your everyday life?

Look at IELTS Speaking Part 1 and discuss the questions

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IELTS Speaking Part 1

a. Which are your favourite animals? Why?

b. Which animals don’t you like? Why?

c. Where are the best places in your country to see wildlife?

d. How popular is watching wildlife in your country?

1. Which question(s) ask(s) you to express your feelings or opinions ?

2. Which question(s) ask(s) you for information ?

Think how you could answer questions a-d in two or three sentences. If you like, note down some ideas

Listen to Suchin answering questions of IELTS Speaking Part 1 and make notes about her answers

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IELTS Speaking Part 1

a. Which are your favourite animals? Why?

b. Which animals don’t you like? Why?

c. Where are the best places in your country to see wildlife?

d. How popular is watching wildlife in your country?

Examiner Suchin

Examiner: Which are your favourite animals?
Suchin: Cats, well, I love my cat, because I’ve had him for nearly a year now and I love him. He’s so beautiful. He’s black with a white nose. He sleeps on my bed every night and he — I’m not sure how you say this — but when he’s there, I’m not alone. And I’m quite keen on birds — there are lots in the gardens around my house.
Examiner: Which animals don’t you like?
Suchin: I hate insects in the summer. They’re horrible!
Examiner: Why?
Suchin: Well, I live near a large river and there are lots of — I don’t know what their name is in English — small insects which bite and come at night. I’m not too keen on flies, either.
Examiner: Where are the best places in your country to see wildlife?
Suchin: That’s a difficult question. I’m not sure. There are so many places with wildlife, but I’m not sure how easy it is to see the animals because it’s really a forest, with many trees.
Examiner: How popular is watching wildlife in your country?
Suchin: It’s hard to say. What is the activity called? Hunting is quite popular for some types of animal, but watching wildlife, I don’t think I know if it’s popular or not. I think people like to go to zoos, but it’s not the same.



Complete each gap with one or two words. Then listen to Suchin again to check your answers

Look at the phrases from Suchin’s answer and discuss the questions

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  1. I love my cat …
  2. I’m not sure how you say this, but …
  3. I’m quite keen on birds …
  4. I hate insects in the summer.
  5. I don’t know what their name is in English.
  6. I’m not too keen on flies, either.
  7. That’s a difficult question. I’m not sure.
  8. It’s difficult to say.
  9. What is the activity called?

Which phrases does Suchin use:

🔹when she doesn’t know a word?

🔹when she’s not sure of the answer?

🔹to express strong feelings?

🔹to express feelings which are not so strong?

Answer the questions of IELTS Speaking Part 1

IELTS Speaking Part 1

a. Which are your favourite animals? Why?

b. Which animals don’t you like? Why?

c. Where are the best places in your country to see wildlife?

d. How popular is watching wildlife in your country?

Underline the word(s) you should stress in these sentences

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Pronunciation

Sentence stress 2

We stress the words in a sentence which carry the meaning, or which express our feelings.

Native speakers do not normally stress «function words» because both the speaker and listener know the grammar and do not need to hear it clearly.

When we stress words in sentences, we tend to spend longer saying them, but we don’t usually say them louder.

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Listen and check your answers. Then read the sentences aloud

  1. I’m not sure how you say this, but when he’s there, I’m not alone.
  2. I don’t know what their name is in English.
  3. That’s a difficult question. I’m not sure.
  4. It’s hard to say.
  5. What is the activity called?

Look at the sentences and decide which words in these sentences should be stressed. Listen and check your answers, then read the sentences aloud

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  1. I’ve had him for nearly a year now and I love him. He’s so beautiful.
  2. I hate insects in the summer. They’re horrible!

Write your answers to these question and underline the words you would stress

1. Which are your favourite animals? Why?

2. Which animals don’t you like? Why not?

Read the exam card, make notes and prepare a 2-minute speech

Criteria:

  1. Answer all the points
  2. Keep going for more than a minuteIntroduce and round off the talk
  3. Use some of the signposting phrases (firstly, in addition, for instance, finally)
  4. Use tenses correctly
  5. Use your notes
  6. Sound interested in what you are saying
  7. Look at the examiner


Exam advice

Speaking Part 2

  • Structure your talk by using your notes and introducing your points clearly to the examiner.
  • Use appropriate phrases to mark the stages in your talk.

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Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|L19

Useful language

Talking about likes/dislikes

  • I love …
  • I’m quite keen on …
  • I hate …
  • I’m not too keen on … , either.

Paraphrasing

  • I’m not sure how you say this, but …
  • I don’t know what their name is in English …
  • That’s a difficult question. I’m not sure.
  • It’s difficult to say.
  • What is … called?

Evaluate your answer according to the criteria. Tick the ones you have sticked to

Read the passage and choose the correct option


So you think humans are unique

1. There was a time when we thought humans were special in so many ways. Now we know better. We are not the only species that feels emotions, empathises with others or abides by a moral code. Neither are we the only ones with personalities, cultures and the ability to design and use tools. Yet we have steadfastly clung to the notion that one attribute, at least, makes us unique: we alone have the capacity for language.

2. Alas, it turns out we are not so special in this respect either. Key to the revolutionary reassessment of our talent for communication is the way we think about language itself. Where once it was seen as a monolith, a discrete and singular entity, today scientists find it is more productive to think of language as a suite of abilities. Viewed this way, it becomes apparent that the component parts of a language are not as unique as the whole.

3. Take gesture, arguably the starting point for language. Until recently, it was considered uniquely human — but not any more. Mike Tomasello of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and others have compiled a list of gestures observed in monkeys, gibbons, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and orang-utans, which reveals that gesticulation plays a large role in their communication. Ape gestures can involve touch, vocalising or eye movement, and individuals wait until they have another ape’s attention before making visual or auditory gestures. If their gestures go unacknowledged, they will often repeat them or touch the recipient.

4. In an experiment carried out in 2006 by Erica Cartmill and Richard Byrne from the University of St Andrews in the UK, they got a person to sit on a chair with some highly desirable food such as banana to one side of them and some bland food such as celery to the other. The orangutans, who could see the person and the food from their enclosures, gestured at their human partners to encourage them to push the desirable food their way. If the person feigned incomprehension and offered the bland food, the animals would change their gestures — just as humans would in a similar situation. If the human seemed to understand while being somewhat confused, giving only half the preferred food, the apes would repeat and exaggerate their gestures — again in exactly the same way a human would. Such findings highlight the fact that the gestures of non­human primates are not merely innate reflexes but are learned, flexible and under voluntary control — all characteristics that are considered prerequisites for human-like communication. As well as gesturing, pre-linguistic infants babble. At about five months, babies start to make their first speech sounds, which some researchers believe contain a random selection of all the phonemes humans can produce. But as children learn the language of their parents, they narrow their sound repertoire to fit the model to which they are exposed, producing just the sounds of their native language as well as its classic intonation patterns. Indeed, they lose their polymath talents so effectively that they are ultimately unable to produce some sounds — think about the difficulty some speakers have producing the English «th».

5. Dolphin calves also pass through a babbling phase, Laurance Doyle from the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, Brenda McCowan from the University of California at Davis and their colleagues analysed the complexity of baby dolphin sounds and found it looked remarkably like that of babbling infants, in that the young dolphins had a much wider repertoire of sound than adults. This suggests that they practise the sounds of their species, much as human babies do, before they begin to put them together in the way characteristic of mature dolphins of their species.

6. Of course, language is more than mere sound — it also has meaning. While the traditional, cartoonish version of animal communication renders it unclear, unpredictable and involuntary, it has become clear that various species are able to give meaning to particular sounds by connecting them with specific ideas. Dolphins use «signature whistles», so called because it appears that they name themselves. Each develops a unique nickname within the first year of life and uses it whenever it meets another dolphin.

7. One of the clearest examples of animals making connections between specific sounds and meanings was demonstrated by Klaus Zuberbuhler and Katie Slocombe of the University of St Andrews in the UK. They noticed that chimps at Edinburgh Zoo appeared to make basic references to objects by using distinct cries when they came across different kinds of food. Highly valued foods such as bread would elicit high-pitched grunts, less appealing ones, such as an apple, got low-pitched grunts. Zuberbuhler and Slocombe showed not only that chimps could make distinctions in the way they vocalised about food, but that other chimps understood what they meant. When they played recordings of grunts that were produced for a specific food, the chimps looked in the place where that food was usually found. They also searched longer if the cry had signalled a prized type of food.

8. Clearly animals do have greater talents for communication than we realised. Humans are still special, but it is a far more graded, qualified kind of special than it used to be.


Decide if the following statements agree with the claims of the writer in Reading Passage

Yes — if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer

No — if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer

Not given — if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

Read the passage again and complete the summary

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So you think humans are unique

1. There was a time when we thought humans were special in so many ways. Now we know better. We are not the only species that feels emotions, empathises with others or abides by a moral code. Neither are we the only ones with personalities, cultures and the ability to design and use tools. Yet we have steadfastly clung to the notion that one attribute, at least, makes us unique: we alone have the capacity for language.

2. Alas, it turns out we are not so special in this respect either. Key to the revolutionary reassessment of our talent for communication is the way we think about language itself. Where once it was seen as a monolith, a discrete and singular entity, today scientists find it is more productive to think of language as a suite of abilities. Viewed this way, it becomes apparent that the component parts of a language are not as unique as the whole.

3. Take gesture, arguably the starting point for language. Until recently, it was considered uniquely human — but not any more. Mike Tomasello of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and others have compiled a list of gestures observed in monkeys, gibbons, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and orang-utans, which reveals that gesticulation plays a large role in their communication. Ape gestures can involve touch, vocalising or eye movement, and individuals wait until they have another ape’s attention before making visual or auditory gestures. If their gestures go unacknowledged, they will often repeat them or touch the recipient.

4. In an experiment carried out in 2006 by Erica Cartmill and Richard Byrne from the University of St Andrews in the UK, they got a person to sit on a chair with some highly desirable food such as banana to one side of them and some bland food such as celery to the other. The orangutans, who could see the person and the food from their enclosures, gestured at their human partners to encourage them to push the desirable food their way. If the person feigned incomprehension and offered the bland food, the animals would change their gestures — just as humans would in a similar situation. If the human seemed to understand while being somewhat confused, giving only half the preferred food, the apes would repeat and exaggerate their gestures — again in exactly the same way a human would. Such findings highlight the fact that the gestures of non­human primates are not merely innate reflexes but are learned, flexible and under voluntary control — all characteristics that are considered prerequisites for human-like communication. As well as gesturing, pre-linguistic infants babble. At about five months, babies start to make their first speech sounds, which some researchers believe contain a random selection of all the phonemes humans can produce. But as children learn the language of their parents, they narrow their sound repertoire to fit the model to which they are exposed, producing just the sounds of their native language as well as its classic intonation patterns. Indeed, they lose their polymath talents so effectively that they are ultimately unable to produce some sounds — think about the difficulty some speakers have producing the English «th».

5. Dolphin calves also pass through a babbling phase, Laurance Doyle from the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, Brenda McCowan from the University of California at Davis and their colleagues analysed the complexity of baby dolphin sounds and found it looked remarkably like that of babbling infants, in that the young dolphins had a much wider repertoire of sound than adults. This suggests that they practise the sounds of their species, much as human babies do, before they begin to put them together in the way characteristic of mature dolphins of their species.

6. Of course, language is more than mere sound — it also has meaning. While the traditional, cartoonish version of animal communication renders it unclear, unpredictable and involuntary, it has become clear that various species are able to give meaning to particular sounds by connecting them with specific ideas. Dolphins use «signature whistles», so called because it appears that they name themselves. Each develops a unique nickname within the first year of life and uses it whenever it meets another dolphin.

7. One of the clearest examples of animals making connections between specific sounds and meanings was demonstrated by Klaus Zuberbuhler and Katie Slocombe of the University of St Andrews in the UK. They noticed that chimps at Edinburgh Zoo appeared to make basic references to objects by using distinct cries when they came across different kinds of food. Highly valued foods such as bread would elicit high-pitched grunts, less appealing ones, such as an apple, got low-pitched grunts. Zuberbuhler and Slocombe showed not only that chimps could make distinctions in the way they vocalised about food, but that other chimps understood what they meant. When they played recordings of grunts that were produced for a specific food, the chimps looked in the place where that food was usually found. They also searched longer if the cry had signalled a prized type of food.

8. Clearly animals do have greater talents for communication than we realised. Humans are still special, but it is a far more graded, qualified kind of special than it used to be.

Listen and choose the correct option

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Welcome to this podcast about the Sheepmarket, which is one of the oldest parts of the city. As its name suggests, there was originally a market here where farmers brought their sheep, but now it’s been redeveloped into a buzzing, vibrant area of the city, which is also home to one of the city’s fastest-growing communities. The nearby university has always meant the area’s popular with students, who come in to enjoy the lively nightlife, but now graduates embarking on careers in the worlds of fashion and design are buying up the new apartments recently built here to replace the small houses where the market workers used to live.

The narrow old side streets are great places for finding original pictures, jewellery and ceramics which won’t break the bank, as well as local produce like fruit and vegetables. There’s also lots of pavement cafes where you can have a coffee and watch tourists from all over the world go by. The oldest buildings in the area are on the main streets, including the city’s first department store, built in the 1880s, which is still open today.

The Sheepmarket is a centre for fashion, and there’s a policy of encouraging new young designers. The Young Fashion competition is open to local young people who are passionate about fashion. This year they’ve been asked to design an outfit based on ideas from the music and technology that’s part of their everyday life, using both natural and man-made fibres. The garments will be judged by a panel of experts and fashion designers, and the winning entries will be modelled at a special gala evening.

Parking at the Sheepmarket is easy. There are plenty of pay and display car parking spaces on the roadsides which are fine if you just want to stay for an hour or two, but if you want to spend the day there it’s better to park in one of the four underground car parks. It’s not expensive and if you can present a receipt from one of the local stores, you’ll not be charged at all. After six p.m., many of the car parks have a flat rate which varies but it is usually very reasonable.

The Sheepmarket is one of the main centres for art and history in the whole of the country.

If you look at our map, you’ll see some of the main attractions there. Most visitors start from Crawley Road, at the bottom of the map. The Reynolds House is one of the oldest houses in the city, and is open to the public. It’s on the north side of Crawley Road, next to the footpath that leads to the public gardens.

The area’s particularly interesting for its unusual sculptures. «The Thumb» is just what its name suggests, but it’s about 10 metres high. You’ll see it on Hill Road, across the road from the Bank.

The Museum’s got a particularly fine collection of New Zealand landscapes. It’s on the east side of the Sheepmarket, on City Road. It’s on the other side of the road from the public gardens, immediately facing the junction with Hill Road.

The Contemporary Art Gallery is on a little road that leads off Station Square, not far from the public gardens. The road ends at the gallery — it doesn’t go anywhere else. That’s open every day except Mondays.

The Warner Gallery specialises in 19th-century art. It’s on City Road, near the junction with Crawley Road, on the same side of the road as the public gardens. It’s open on weekdays from 9 to 5, and entry is free.

Finally, if you’re interested in purchasing high quality artwork, the place to go is Nucleus. You need to go from Crawley Road up through Station Square and east along Hill Road until you get to a small winding road turning off. Go up there and it’s on your right — if you get to City Road, you’ve gone too far.



Label the map below

Read the information about IELTS Writing task 2

IELTS Writing Task 2

IELTS Essay

During the exam, you should spend about 40 minutes on this task and write at least 250 words.

Essays can be of different kinds: opinion essays, advantages and disadvantages essays, problem and solution essays, discussion essays («discuss both views»), two-part question essays.


Read the exam task instruction and the plan. Write an essay

IELTS Writing Task 2

IELTS Essay

You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.

Many people have a close relationship with their pets. These people treat their birds, cats, or other animals as members of their family. In your opinion, are such relationships good? Why or why not?

Discuss both views and give your own opinion. Give reasons for your answer and include any relevant examples from your own knowledge or experience.

Write at least 250 words.

Instruction

  1. Think what you are going to write about.
  2. Brainstorm ideas about pros and cons. Provide the example for each point. Think about the conclusion.
  3. Write a plan following the given structure.
  4. Using the results of your brainstorming and the plan, write the essay.
  5. Follow the structure of the essay and use the given vocabulary.
  6. Make sure you have used linking words and phrases to make your essay easy to read and understand.
  7. Check your essay.

Plan

Introduction

  • Sentence 1 — Paraphrase question
  • Sentence 2 — Outline sentence

Supporting Paragraph 1 (Agreeing)

  • Sentence 3 — Topic sentence (Pros)
  • Sentence 4 — Explain the topic sentence
  • Sentence 5 — Example

Supporting Paragraph 2 (Disagreeing)

  • Sentence 6 — Topic sentence (Cons)
  • Sentence 7 — Explain the topic sentence
  • Sentence 8 — Example

Conclusion

  • Sentence 9 — Summary of the main points

Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|L19

Useful language

  • To understand the role of …
  • Firstly, … and its links with …
  • Next, it closely examines … in relation to …
  • Finally, it focuses on … and how this affects …
  • One aspect which illustrates …can be identified as …
  • The current debate about … identifies an interesting viewpoint on …
  • This first/next/final point … provides a general discussion of …
  • Building on from the idea that … , this section illustrates that … .
  • To further understand the role of … this section explores the idea that …
  • Another line of thought on … demonstrates that …
  • However, another angle on this debate suggests that …
  • In contrast to evidence which presents the view that … , an alternative perspective illustrates that …
  • However, not all research shows that … . Some evidence agrees that …
  • This evidence highlights that …
  • There is general agreement that …
  • The strength of such an approach is that …
  • Clearly, … has shown that the main factors which impact upon … are …
  • The evidence has shown that …
  • To conclude, …

Owners and their pets

  • Who are they?
  • Speaking about animals
  • Your pet
  • Useful phrases
  • Stressing the correct word
  • Stress practice
  • Interesting animals
  • Humans and apes
  • Animal communication
  • Sheepmarket
  • Relationships with pets
  • Humans and apes
  • Animal communication
  • Sheepmarket
  • Relationships with pets
  1. 1. IELTS|Intermediate|1. Dream city
  2. 2. IELTS|Intermediate|2. Booking an apartment
  3. 3. IELTS|Intermediate|3. Talking about your hometown
  4. 4. IELTS|Intermediate|4. Where to go?
  5. 5. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 1
  6. 6. IELTS|Intermediate|5. Explorer and writer
  7. 7. IELTS|Intermediate|6. Travelling companions
  8. 8. IELTS|Intermediate|7. Family and childhood
  9. 9. IELTS|Intermediate|8. Families around the world
  10. 10. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 2
  11. 11. IELTS|Intermediate|9. Machines in our life
  12. 12. IELTS|Intermediate|10. On board
  13. 13. IELTS|Intermediate|11. Travelling around
  14. 14. IELTS|Intermediate|12. Different ways
  15. 15. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 3
  16. 16. IELTS|Intermediate| 13. Old innovation
  17. 17. IELTS|Intermediate|14. At an exhibition
  18. 18. IELTS|Intermediate|15. Electronic devices
  19. 19. IELTS|Intermediate|16. Inventions
  20. 20. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 4
  21. 21. IELTS|Intermediate|17. Wild animals
  22. 22. IELTS|Intermediate|18. In the zoo
  23. 23. IELTS|Intermediate|19. Animals in our life
  24. 24. IELTS|Intermediate|20. Animal life
  25. 25. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 5
  26. 26. IELTS|Intermediate|21. It makes difference
  27. 27. IELTS|Intermediate|22. Successful people
  28. 28. IELTS|Intermediate|23. Human memory
  29. 29. IELTS|Intermediate|24. Talent and success
  30. 30. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 6
  31. 31. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: reading and speaking
  32. 32. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: listening and writing