IELTS|Intermediate|23. Human memory

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Decide if these statements are about IELTS Speaking Section 1, Section 3 or both of them

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Look at this Part 3 questions and Kim’s answer. Discuss the questions

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1. Is the candidate giving reasons and examples or talking about a number of different possible methods ?

2. What word does he use to begin the answer ?

3. How would you characterise this answer?

a) It is not on the topic.

b) It is personal, not general.

c) It is too short.

d) It only gives one method.

e) It is grammatically inaccurate.

Complete the answer using the ideas in these pictures

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Listen and compare the speaker’s answer with your own

Well, some people use a calendar and others use a diary. But I think if you’re really busy, you’ll make a list, maybe on your iPhone if you have one. Or sometimes you see a note on the back of someone’s hand!

Underline the words in the answer that refer to people in general

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«Some people» refers to people in general.

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Discuss the questions using the words and phrases from the list

some people, others, if you’re really busy, sometimes

1. What sort of things do people forget?

2. What can people do if they forget something important, like

a) meeting a relative for lunch?

b) handing in the project on time?

c) calling a partner when promised?

d) picking children from the kindergarten/school?

e) visiting a theater?

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Listen to the candidate’s answer to Speaking Part 3 and do the task below

I think birthdays are very easy to forget. You have to write the dates in a diary if you want to remember them! Um, and some older people can’t remember where they put their keys or their phone. Oh, and, er, if something unexpected happens, you might forget a lunch date or a meeting – there are lots of things …


1. What question is she answering?

2. Complete the answer below with the things people forget.

Listen to the two extracts from Anna Maria’s answer. Decide which tone the speaker uses on each underlined word

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We use a rising intonation to tell our listener that we haven’t finished what we are saying, and a falling intonation to show we’re finishing.

1. You have to write the dates in a diary if you want to remember them.

2. … you might forget a lunch date or a meeting …


1. You have to write the dates in a diary if you want to remember them.

2. … you might forget a lunch date or a meeting


Underline the words where the speaker’s voice might rise to show that they haven’t finished speaking. Then listen and check your answers

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1. Sometimes people forget their dentist or doctor’s appointment and things like that.

2. If a friend waits a long time for you, you should say you’re sorry and pay next time you go out.

3. People don’t usually fall asleep at work unless they’re very tired.

4. A boring meeting or a long car journey can make people go to sleep!

Discuss the questions

Criteria:

  1. Answer all the points.
  2. Keep going for more than a minute.
  3. Introduce and round off the talk.
  4. Use some of the signposting phrases.
  5. Use the correct intonation.
  6. Use generalising ideas.
  7. Give the full answer of more than one choice mentioned.
  8. Use tenses correctly.
  9. Sound interested in what you are saying.
  10. Look at the examiner while speaking.

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  1. In what places can people fall asleep?
  2. What things can make people fall asleep?
  3. Why do some people not get enough sleep?


  1. What sort of things do people need to remember every day?
  2. Why do people sometimes forget important things?
  3. What activities can help improve people’s memory?


Wordlist

1. diary

2. remind

3. calendar

4. memorise

5. remember

6. forget

Read the text and find the words to match the following definitions

Fighting fear using virtual reality

Computers are not just for entertainment, shopping or research purposes — as one woman found out when she tried to cure her fears.

Most people have at least one thing they are afraid of. A fear of things like snakes, spiders, dogs, heights or open spaces affects over 90% of the population. In extreme cases, a fear can develop into a phobia, where the fear of something is so powerful it can affect the way the sufferer lives their life. About 10% of people suffer from a phobia. Most sufferers never seek treatment, because the most common type of cure — «exposure therapy» — involves them being exposed to the object of their fear, and this is the last thing many of them are prepared to do.

There is now a new cure for phobias, using something called virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET). The concept is simple. The person with the phobia wears a virtual reality headset. A computer, controlled by a therapist, then simulates a variety of situations in which the sufferer is gradually exposed to the object of their fear, which they view on the headset’s screen. At the same time, the therapist explains why they should not be afraid of it. The technique is surprisingly successful, as this case demonstrates.

Sara Considine had a serious spider phobia, and had developed several spider-related behaviour patterns. Before going to bed, for example, she would check her room for spiders, then seal the windows with tape so none could get in. She had frightening dreams about spiders every night. Eventually, she decided to get treatment.

During twelve one-hour virtual reality sessions over a three-month period, Ms Considine started very slowly. First, she stood a long way from the virtual spider and just looked at it. Slowly, she moved a little closer. The therapist controlling the computer programme then made the virtual spider move. After just two sessions, Ms Considine reported that although she still saw spiders in her dreams, they were no longer frightening, and she had even managed to have an amusing «conversation» with one of them. A few sessions later, the therapist encouraged her to hold the virtual spider in her virtual hand, and put it in places where the presence of a real spider would cause her fear. The next stage was to introduce touch. A large toy spider was placed next to her.

Ms Considine then reached out to touch the virtual spider she could see on the screen, and at the same time her real hand touched the toy spider.

After her sessions were over, Sara Considine was able to stop her spider-related behaviour. She even took up camping, something she would never have considered before therapy. More recently she has appeared on a television nature programme, where for the first time she was able to hold a real spider in her hands.

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Read the passage one more time and complete the summary. There are extra options which you don’t need to use

Fighting fear using virtual reality

Computers are not just for entertainment, shopping or research purposes — as one woman found out when she tried to cure her fears.

Most people have at least one thing they are afraid of. A fear of things like snakes, spiders, dogs, heights or open spaces affects over 90% of the population. In extreme cases, a fear can develop into a phobia, where the fear of something is so powerful it can affect the way the sufferer lives their life. About 10% of people suffer from a phobia. Most sufferers never seek treatment, because the most common type of cure — «exposure therapy» — involves them being exposed to the object of their fear, and this is the last thing many of them are prepared to do.

There is now a new cure for phobias, using something called virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET). The concept is simple. The person with the phobia wears a virtual reality headset. A computer, controlled by a therapist, then simulates a variety of situations in which the sufferer is gradually exposed to the object of their fear, which they view on the headset’s screen. At the same time, the therapist explains why they should not be afraid of it. The technique is surprisingly successful, as this case demonstrates.

Sara Considine had a serious spider phobia, and had developed several spider-related behaviour patterns. Before going to bed, for example, she would check her room for spiders, then seal the windows with tape so none could get in. She had frightening dreams about spiders every night. Eventually, she decided to get treatment.

During twelve one-hour virtual reality sessions over a three-month period, Ms Considine started very slowly. First, she stood a long way from the virtual spider and just looked at it. Slowly, she moved a little closer. The therapist controlling the computer programme then made the virtual spider move. After just two sessions, Ms Considine reported that although she still saw spiders in her dreams, they were no longer frightening, and she had even managed to have an amusing «conversation» with one of them. A few sessions later, the therapist encouraged her to hold the virtual spider in her virtual hand, and put it in places where the presence of a real spider would cause her fear. The next stage was to introduce touch. A large toy spider was placed next to her.

Ms Considine then reached out to touch the virtual spider she could see on the screen, and at the same time her real hand touched the toy spider.

After her sessions were over, Sara Considine was able to stop her spider-related behaviour. She even took up camping, something she would never have considered before therapy. More recently she has appeared on a television nature programme, where for the first time she was able to hold a real spider in her hands.


A afraid of F quickly
B amused by G slowly
C contact H touch
D held I three
E observed J twelve

Listen to a guide talking about the town of Tanbridge and match the people with the sentence endings

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Now, not only do we have lots of historical architecture here in the town of Tanbridge, we also have a rich variety of famous residents. Of course, everyone has heard of the famous writers Jim Harman, Anna Collins and Ian Cheriton, or I. H. Cheriton, as he is better known. And they have all lived in our small town! In fact, Anna Collins, the celebrated romance novelist, spent all her life in this town. She lived by the town square, where there is a plaque to commemorate her. She died in 1968 and you can see her gravestone in Tanbridge Cemetery. You may know Anna from her most famous work, The Pride of Angels, which won numerous awards and for which she was a runner-up for the Herald Prize in 1950.

James Harman also lived here between 1975 and 1990. A bestselling horror writer, he got many of his themes for his haunting novels from this very town. He passed away a year after leaving Tanbridge and although he isn’t buried in the town, we do have a statue of him on the roundabout as you enter the town.

Now, I. H. Cheriton has been the Poet Laureate for three years and he lives in Tanbridge today. His home is the red house by the river. Not only a poet, he has also written ten novels that have topped the book sales charts. He always does a lot of work for local charities and is quite a gem in this town.

Lastly, another famous resident of Tanbridge is Sylvia Daniels. She grew up in Tanbridge and went to the local comprehensive here. You can see her childhood home just across the river by the post office. Now, I am sure you all know her for her latest film Planet Dust, which has just reached number one at the cinema box office. But she wasn’t always an actress. Before she headed for Hollywood, you could have seen her waiting tables in The Dorage Restaurant here in town! She often comes back to visit as her family all still live here. If you’re lucky, you may even catch a glimpse of her!


Listen to a writer talking about fame and answer the questions

Interviewer Phyllis

Interviewer: So, we have Phyllis Bailey here to talk to us about fame. Her new book, Famous for Fifteen Minutes, is coming out on Monday. So Phyllis, welcome. What do you think fame means to us these days?
Phyllis: Well, famous people are everywhere and although we know nearly all there is to know about these people — their lives are splashed all over magazines and television — they’ve retained their mystery. The public are always eager to find out more about them and this fuels the paparazzi to photograph them. It’s true that there are more celebrities around than ever before, but the number of really important famous people probably hasn’t changed greatly. This is because people became famous for only a short time. Andy Warhol once famously said, «In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes», and I think there’s some truth in that. One day a person is famous and the next they are forgotten. Take, for example, contestants on reality television shows. After maybe six months we never see them again. This also highlights another characteristic of fame: in the past people became famous because of something they had done, or because of their talent. Nowadays these things aren’t necessary. I personally think this is a great pity.
Interviewer: Is fame particularly beneficial now?
Phyllis: Well, let’s look at the winners and losers when it comes to fame. Many people think that celebrities are the losers in this new media world, but that isn’t necessarily the case. Take, for example, actors and actresses. They often complain about a lack of privacy, but privacy is possible. There are many celebrities who aren’t constantly in the papers. Much as they complain, they chase the publicity and then blame it on the media. In fact, the paparazzi, who photograph the rich and famous, are often seen as figures of hate for this. They come off much worse in the end, because they are so disliked by the public and celebrities. But in reality, they are making the celebrities and their managers even richer. In fact, because of the cult of fame nowadays, we can see media executives making even more money and celebrities signing multi-million pound deals. And who pays for this? Well, all of us. Cinema and concert ticket prices have risen and DVDs cost more than ever. Merchandising makes a fortune for the famous these days. And although we are paying for it, the rewards go to only a small elite — the big players, the stars and the executives, but they miss a lot of the creative talent in the industry, like the people who write the screenplays. They are still on the same salary they were on ten years ago. Executives certainly have a difficult job managing their clients, but they get rewarded well for doing so. I for one think these rewards should be more fairly spread.
Interviewer: How could this be done? Are you …?


Read the task and prepare your 2-minute speech on the topic «People around us»

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IELTS Speaking Part 3

  • Which type of people are respected most in your society?
  • Do you agree with this situation?
  • What happens when young people lack good role models?
  • What standards of behaviour should teachers set?
  • Do you agree that you should never meet your heroes?

Speak no longer than 2 minutes

Cover all of the points, use the active vocabulary of the lesson

  1. Structure your talk by using your notes and introducing you points clearly.
  2. Use appropriate phrases to mark the stages in your talk.
  3. Give reasons for your answers.
  4. Offer extra details and extend on your answer.
  5. Sound interested in what you are saying.
  6. Speak clearly so that the examiner can hear you easily.
  7. Use a wide range of vocabulary.


Stalling for time

  • That’s a(n) interesting/tough/difficult question.
  • I don’t know much about this issue but …
  • I’ve never really thought about it before but …

Giving an opinion

  • Well, I think/suppose/would say …
  • … for two/several reasons.
  • I think most people would agree that …

Self-correcting

  • Or rather …
  • I mean …
  • Or, should I say …

Rephrasing

  • What I mean is …
  • What I want to say is …
  • What I’m trying to say is …

Commenting on your own ideas

  • I know this may sound obvious but …
  • This may sound strange but …
  • I’m sorry to have to say this but …

Giving an example

  • Take …, for example.
  • Look at …, for instance.
  • A good example of this is …

Introducing other ideas

  • On the other hand, …
  • Or, to look at it another way, …
  • Then again, …

Getting to the point

  • Anyway, to get to the point, …
  • Anyway, the main point I want to make is that …
  • So, in answer to your question, …

Concluding

  • So, that’s why I think …
  • Anyway, that’s why…
  • So, to return to my original point, …


Allow your browser access to your microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

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Read the IELTS Writing task 2 instruction and get ready to write an essay

IELTS Writing Part 2. IELTS Essay

Ordinary people try to copy famous personalities by seeing them on TV or reading about them in the newspapers.

What is the reason for this? Is it a good idea to copy famous personalities?

Give reasons for your answers along with relevant examples from your experience and knowledge.

You can now solve this essay in at least 250 words.

During the Exam you should spend about 40 minutes on this task and write at least 250 words.

Essays can be of different kinds: opinion essays, advantages and disadvantages essays, problem and solution essays, discussion essays (Discuss both views), two-part question essays.


  1. Think what you are going to write about.
  2. Brainstorm ideas about pros and cons. Provide the example for each point. Think about the conclusion.
  3. Write the plan following the given structure.
  4. Using the results of your brainstorming and the plan, write the essay.
  5. Follow the structure of the essay and use the given vocabulary.
  6. Make sure you have used linking words and phrases to make you essay easy to read and understand.
  7. Check your essay.


Introduction

  • Sentence 1 — Paraphrase question
  • Sentence 2 — Outline sentence

Supporting Paragraph 1 (Agreeing)

  • Sentence 3 — Topic sentence (Pros)
  • Sentence 4 — Explain the topic sentence
  • Sentence 5 — Example

Supporting Paragraph 2 (Disagreeing)

  • Sentence 6 — Topic sentence (Cons)
  • Sentence 7 — Explain the topic sentence
  • Sentence 8 — Example

Conclusion

  • Sentence 9 — Summary of the main points

For more information, refer to the following 🔗website


Introducing the topic

  • Some people argue that …
  • Have you ever considered … ?
  • The question raises the issue of …

Stating an opinion (thesis statement)

  • I believe that …
  • It is my belief that …
  • This essay will argue that …

Indicating the scope of the essay

  • In this essay, I will state …
  • This essay will examine …
  • … will be covered in this essay.

Giving reasons

  • One reason for this is that …
  • This can be explained by …
  • This can be attributed to the fact that …

Giving further reasons

  • Not only that, but …
  • A further reason is …
  • It should also be stated that …

Citing general opinions

  • It has been claimed that …
  • It is widely believed that …
  • There is a widespread belief that …

Refuting opinions

  • I would dispute this, however.
  • However, this is not necessarily the case.
  • There are some faults with this reasoning, however.

Hedging strategies

  • It could be argued that …
  • One explanation might be that …
  • This suggests that …

Strengthening an argument

  • There can be no doubt that …
  • Therefore, we can say beyond any doubt that …
  • These are just some of the reasons why …

Concluding and summarising

  • To sum up, … / In summary, … / In short, …
  • Overall, … / On the whole, …
  • To return to my original idea,…


Role models

Урок Homework Курс
  • What part is it?
  • Talking about memory
  • How to answer
  • Some people
  • Sample answer
  • Rising and falling tunes
  • Speaking practice
  • Meet your fear
  • Fight your fear
  • People and a town
  • Talking about people
  • Role models