IELTS|Intermediate|3. Talking about your hometown

pic1_IELTS|Int|L3

Match the questions with the topics. Discuss the questions

Table1_IELTS|Int|L3

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Listen to two candidates answering these questions and complete the notes in the table

Examiner Hanan Kwan

Examiner: Can you tell me what you do, Hanan? Do you work, or are you a student?
Hanan: Yes, I’m a student. I’m studying medicine because I want to be a doctor. At the moment, I’m studying English as well because I hope to do part of my degree course in Australia.
Examiner: And where do you come from?
Hanan: I come from Muttrah in Oman.
Examiner: Can you describe Muttrah a little bit for me?
Hanan: Yes. It’s quite a large city by the sea and also near the mountains. It’s very beautiful and very old. It’s very hot in the summer, but the winter is usually very pleasant. Also, Muttrah is an important port.
Examiner: Can you tell me what you do, Kwan? Do you work, or are you a student?
Kwan: I’m a student. I’m studying economics at Chonju University at the moment.
Examiner: And where do you come from, Kwan?
Kwan: I come from a small village near Chonju in Korea.
Examiner: Can you describe your village to me?
Kwan: Well, it’s in the mountains. The people work as farmers and they are very friendly. It’s a good place to live, but not much happens there.


  • Can you tell me what you do?
  • Where do you come from?
  • Can you describe your city /town /village to me?
Name Occupation where from where located words used to describe place
Hanan Muttrah, Oman large,

Kwan near Chonju,

Look at the questions and the phrases below. Which phrases can be used to answer the questions?

 


Listen to Hanan and Kwan answering questions. Which phrases are used by Hanan and which by Kwan?

Examiner Hanan Kwan

Examiner: What do you like about the area where you live?
Hanan: Oh, I really like the sea and the part of the city just by the sea because it’s very beautiful and there are always lots of people there. I live in the suburbs, but I enjoy going shopping in the city centre. There are plenty of good shops, and I like buying clothes.
Examiner: What things in Muttrah do you not like?
Hanan: Mm, I’m not very keen on the hot weather, and the hot wind from the desert is something I don’t like.
Examiner: Mm. How is the area changing?
Hanan: They’re building more houses and roads. It’s getting busier.
Examiner: What do you like about the area where you live, Kwan?
Kwan: I find walking in the mountains very enjoyable, and another good thing is the people, because they’re very friendly and generous. I think people in my village are very happy and relaxed.
Examiner: What things in your village do you not like?
Kwan: Well, I live by a busy main road and I find the traffic very unpleasant. I really dislike the noise of cars and lorries.
Examiner: How is the area changing?
Kwan: There’s more traffic, so the village is becoming noisier. Also, young people are leaving the village, so it isn’t so lively.


pic1_Adults|Grammar|El|L33

Listen to the answers of the candidates one more time and complete the table

Examiner Hanan Kwan

Examiner: What do you like about the area where you live?
Hanan: Oh, I really like the sea and the part of the city just by the sea because it’s very beautiful and there are always lots of people there. I live in the suburbs, but I enjoy going shopping in the city centre. There are plenty of good shops, and I like buying clothes.
Examiner: What things in Muttrah do you not like?
Hanan: Mm, I’m not very keen on the hot weather, and the hot wind from the desert is something I don’t like.
Examiner: Mm. How is the area changing?
Hanan: They’re building more houses and roads. It’s getting busier.
Examiner: What do you like about the area where you live, Kwan?
Kwan: I find walking in the mountains very enjoyable, and another good thing is the people, because they’re very friendly and generous. I think people in my village are very happy and relaxed.
Examiner: What things in your village do you not like?
Kwan: Well, I live by a busy main road and I find the traffic very unpleasant. I really dislike the noise of cars and lorries.
Examiner: How is the area changing?
Kwan: There’s more traffic, so the village is becoming noisier. Also, young people are leaving the village, so it isn’t so lively.


Name likes dislikes how is it changing?
Hanan the hot weather,

Kwan walking in the mountains,

Choose the correct option to complete the sentences from the Speaking section and say whether they are Present Simple or Present Continuous

grammar


Intermediate

I usually get up at 8. However, this month I’m taking English classes at SkyEng before work, so I’m getting up at 6.

pic3_IELTS|Int|L3

Examples

Jane usually doesn’t work on Mondays and Wednesdays, but this month the company is very busy, so she‘s working every day.

I live in Moscow. Right now, I‘m visiting my parents in Kazan, so I‘m staying with them for two weeks.

Timeline

pic4_IELTS|Int|L3

Forms

Present Simple Present Continuous
+ I often read crime novels.

Every day Alex makes dinner for his family.

I am currently reading a crime novel.

Alex is making dinner for us at the moment.

We don’t do yoga very often.

Jake doesn’t work at weekends.

We aren’t doing yoga right now.

Jake isn’t working this week, he’s on vacation.

? Where do you live?

Does Amy enjoy travelling?

Where are you staying at the moment?

Is Amy enjoying her holiday?


Frequency adverbs

used before the main verb, but after the verb to be

Always,

usually,

often,

sometimes,

rarely,

seldom,

hardly ever,

never

I always close my door.

BUT

He is always late.

! Sometimes, I order pizza for dinner. = I sometimes order pizza for dinner. = I order pizza for dinner sometimes.

! I usually don’t stay up so late. = I don’t usually stay up so late.

Other expressions

used at the start or the end of the sentence

  • Every/each day/week, month, Tuesday
  • Today, now, right now, at the moment, this week/month/year
  • Once/twice/three times a week/month/year
  • Every now and then, from time to time
Every week our family cleans the house. = Our family cleans the house every week.

Usage

We use Present Simple for We use Present Continuous for

Habits

I play tennis on Tuesdays.

Actions happening at or around the moment of speaking

Alex can’t come to the phone, he‘s having a bath.

Permanent situations

I live in Russia.

Temporary situations

I‘m staying with my grandmother while I’m in France.

Facts and General truths

The sun rises in the east.

Annoying habits (with always)

You‘re always forgetting your keys at home!

 

Attachments

Find and correct the mistakes in these sentences

pic1_Adults|Grammar|Pre-Int|L12


Complete these sentences by putting the verb into the Present Simple or Present Continuous

Point out that pronunciation counts for a quarter of the IELTS Speaking score.

This means that in addition to listening to their grammar, vocabulary and fluency, examiners also note how easily they can understand the candidate. Those who speak clearly and at the correct pace will do better.

Explain that there are recognised features of pronunciation, and examiners want to see how well candidates can use and control these. Tell the student that candidates with good pronunciation will get higher marks.

listen and speak_Lesson

Look at the sentences, underline the words Hanan and Kwan should stress. Listen and check. Read the sentences with correct intonation

Pronunciation

Sentence stress

We normally stress the main information in a sentence.

When we answer a question, we usually stress the words which give the answer, or give new information.

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Think how you can answer the questions using the useful vocabulary on the topic

  1. Can you tell me what you do?
  2. Where do you come from?
  3. Can you describe your city / town / village to me?
  4. What do you like about the area where you live?
  5. What things in your town / city / village do you not like?

  • Another good thing is …
  • I enjoy …
  • I really dislike …
  • I really like …
  • … is something I don’t like.
  • I’m not very keen on …
  • I find … very enjoyable.
  • I find … unpleasant.
  • busy main road
  • traffic
  • … is becoming noisier
  • lively
  • by the sea
  • near the mountains
  • friendly people
  • good place to live

pic7_Business|Adults|Advanced|L19

Discuss the questions with your teacher

Exam tip

  • Listen to the examiner’s questions carefully.
  • Look confidently at the examiner and perhaps smile a little when you answer the questions.
  • Answer the questions openly and, when appropriate, answer with extra details, or a reason.
  • Use a range of vocabulary.
  • Be ready to offer extra information about yourself and try to speak fluently and confidently.
  • Can you tell me what you do? Do you work, or are you a student?
  • Where do you come from?
  • Can you describe your town or city to me?
  • What do you like about the area where you live?
  • What things in your town or city do you not like?
  • How is the area changing?
  • What do people in your area do in their free time?
  • What do you think visitors to your town or region should see? Why?

IELTS Speaking Assessment Criteria

Below are the marking criteria for IELTS speaking.

Fluency Talking at length

Talking without pauses or hesitations

Talking without self-correction

Able to be understood

Using linking devices

Lexical Resource Using a range of words & paraphrasing

Using collocations

Using less common vocabulary

Avoiding errors

Grammar Range & Accuracy Using a range of sentence structures

Using a range of grammar tenses

Avoiding errors

Pronunciation Able to be understood throughout the test

Able to use intonation

Accent does not affect understanding

Accurate word and sound pronunciation

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pic7_IELTS|Int|L3

Answer the questions and fill in the table. Discuss the exam tips which you learnt today

1. Do you think you did well in this task? Why /why not?

2. What strategies and tips did you use?

Exam tip

  • Listen to the examiner’s questions carefully.
  • Look confidently at the examiner and perhaps smile a little when you answer the questions.
  • Answer the questions openly and, when appropriate, answer with extra details, or a reason.
  • Use a range of vocabulary
  • Be ready to offer extra information about yourself and try to speak fluently and confidently.
What I knew about Speaking part 1 before the lesson What I have learnt about Speaking part 1 What else I would like to know about Speaking part 1

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Read the passage and choose the best headings for the paragraphs from the list below

There are more headings than paragraphs, so you will not use them all.

List of Headings

i A truly international environment

ii Once a port city, always a port city

iii Good ports make huge profits

iv How the port changes a city’s infrastructure

v Reasons for the decline of ports

vi Relative significance of trade and service industry

vii Ports and harbours

viii The demands of the oil industry

Look at the following descriptions of some port cities mentioned in Reading Passage. Match the pairs of cities listed below with the descriptions

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There are more pairs of port cities than descriptions, so you will not use them all.


What is a port city?

The port city provides a fascinating and rich understanding of the movement of people and goods around the world. We understand a port as a centre of land-sea exchange, and as a major source of livelihood and a major force for cultural mixing. But do ports all produce a range of common urban characteristics which justify classifying port cities together under a single generic label? Do they have enough in common to warrant distinguishing them from other kinds of cities?

A A port must be distinguished from a harbour. They are two very different things. Most ports have poor harbours, and many fine harbours see few ships. Harbour is a physical concept, a shelter for ships; port is an economic concept, a centre of land-sea exchange which requires good access to a hinterland even more than a sea-linked foreland. It is landward access, which is productive of goods for export and which demands imports, that is critical. Poor harbours can be improved with breakwaters and dredging if there is a demand for a port. Madras and Colombo are examples of harbours expensively improved by enlarging, dredging and building breakwaters.

B Port cities become industrial, financial and service centres and political capitals because of their water connections and the urban concentration which arises there and later draws to it railways, highways and air routes. Water transport means cheap access, the chief basis of all port cities. Many of the world’s biggest cities, for example, London, New York, Shanghai, Istanbul, Buenos Aires, Tokyo, Jakarta, Calcutta, Philadelphia and San Francisco began as ports — that is, with land-sea exchange as their major function — but they have since grown disproportionately in other respects so that their port functions are no longer dominant. They remain different kinds of places from non-port cities and their port functions account for that difference.

C Port functions, more than anything else, make a city cosmopolitan. A port city is open to the world. In it races, cultures, and ideas, as well as goods from a variety of places, jostle, mix and enrich each other and the life of the city. The smell of the sea and the harbour, the sound of boat whistles or the moving tides are symbols of their multiple links with a wide world, samples of which are present in microcosm within their own urban areas.

D Sea ports have been transformed by the advent of powered vessels, whose size and draught have increased. Many formerly important ports have become economically and physically less accessible as a result. By-passed by most of their former enriching flow of exchange, they have become cultural and economic backwaters or have acquired the character of museums of the past. Examples of these are Charleston, Salem, Bristol, Plymouth, Surat, Galle, Melaka, Soochow, and a long list of earlier prominent port cities in Southeast Asia, Africa and Latin America.

E Much domestic port trade has not been recorded. What evidence we have suggests that domestic trade was greater at all periods than external trade. Shanghai, for example, did most of its trade with other Chinese ports and inland cities. Calcutta traded mainly with other parts of India and so on. Most of any city’s population is engaged in providing goods and services for the city itself. Trade outside the city is its basic function. But each basic worker requires food, housing, clothing and other such services. Estimates of the ratio of basic to service workers range from 1:4 to 1:8.

F No city can be simply a port but must be involved in a variety of other activities. The port function of the city draws to it raw materials and distributes them in many other forms. Ports take advantage of the need for breaking up the bulk material where water and land transport meet and where loading and unloading costs can be minimised by refining raw materials or turning them into finished goods. The major examples here are oil refining and ore refining, which are commonly located at ports. It is not easy to draw a line around what is and is not a port function. All ports handle, unload, sort, alter, process, repack, and reship most of what they receive. A city may still be regarded as a port city when it becomes involved in a great range of functions not immediately involved with ships or docks.

G Cities which began as ports retain the chief commercial and administrative centre of the city close to the waterfront. The centre of New York is in lower Manhattan between two river mouths, the City of London is on the Thames, Shanghai along the Bund. This proximity to water is also true of Boston, Philadelphia, Bombay, Calcutta, Madras, Singapore, Bangkok, Hong Kong and Yokohama, where the commercial, financial, and administrative centres are still grouped around their harbours even though each city has expanded into a metropolis. Even a casual visitor cannot mistake them as anything but port cities.


Decide if the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage

Choose:

YES if the statement agrees with the information

NO if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this in the passage

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Listen and complete the notes below. Write no more than two words for each answer

Good day, ladies and gentlemen! I have been asked today to talk to you about the urban landscape. There are two major areas that I will focus on in my talk. How vegetation can have a significant effect on urban climate and how we can better plan our cities using trees to provide a more comfortable environment for us to live in? Trees can have a significant impact on our cities. They can make a city as a whole a bit less windy – or a bit more windy, if that’s what you want. They can make it a bit cooler, if it’s a hot summer day in an Australian city, or they can make it a bit more humid, if it’s a dry inland city. On the local scale, that is in particular areas within the city, trees can make a local area more shady, cooler, more humid and much less windy. In fact, trees — and planting of various kinds — can be used to make city streets actually less dangerous in particular areas. How do trees do all that, you ask? Well, the main difference between a tree and a building is a tree has got an internal mechanism to keep the temperature regulated. It evaporates water through its leaves and that means that the temperature of the leaves is never very far from our own body temperature. The temperature of a building surface on a hot sunny day can easily be 20° more than our temperature. Trees, on the other hand, remain cooler than buildings, because they sweat. This means that they can humidify the air and cool it. A property which can be exploited to improve the local climate. Trees can also help break the force of winds. The reason that high buildings make it windier at ground level is that, as the wind goes higher and higher, it goes faster and faster. When the wind hits the building, it has to go somewhere. Some of it goes over the top and some goes around the sides of the building, forcing those high-level winds down to ground level. That doesn’t happen when you have trees. Trees filter the wind and considerably reduce it, preventing those very large strong gusts that you so very often find around tall buildings. Another problem in built-up areas is that traffic noise is intensified by tall buildings. By planting a belt of trees at the side of the road, you can make things a little quieter. But much of the vehicle noise still goes through the trees. Trees can also help reduce the amount of noise in the surroundings, although the effect is not as large as people like to think. Low-frequency noise in particular just goes through the trees, as though they’re not there. Although trees can significantly improve the local climate, they do, however, take up a lot of space. There are root systems to consider and branches blocking windows and so on. It may, therefore, be difficult to fit trees into the local landscape. There’s not a great deal, you can do if you have what we call a ‘street canyon’ — a whole set of highrises enclosed in a narrow street. Trees need water to grow, they also need some sunlight to grow and you need room to put them. If you have the chance of knocking buildings down and replacing them, then suddenly you can start looking at different ways to design the streets and to introduce.


Read the task and prepare your 3-minute speech on the topic «My hometown»

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Speak no longer than 3 minutes.

Cover all of the points, use the active vocabulary of the lesson.

Speaking Part 1

Exam tip

  1. Give reasons for your answers.
  2. Offer extra details, extend your answer.
  3. Sound interested in what you are saying.
  4. Speak clearly so that the examiner can hear you easily.
  5. Use wide range of vocabulary.

Hometown

  • Where is your hometown?
  • Do you like your hometown?
  • Do you often visit your hometown?
  • What is your hometown like?
  • What is the oldest place in your hometown?
  • What is there for a foreigner to do or see in your hometown?
  • How could your hometown be improved?
  • Has your hometown changed much since you were a child?
  • Is there good public transport in your hometown?
  • Do you think your hometown is a good place to bring up children?

  • Another good thing is …
  • I enjoy …
  • I really dislike …
  • I really like …
  • … is something I don’t like.
  • I’m not very keen on …
  • I find … very enjoyable.
  • I find … unpleasant.
  • busy main road
  • … is becoming noisier
  • by the sea
  • near the mountains
  • friendly people
  • good place to live


Allow your browser access to your microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

  • Warm-up
  • Straightforward questions
  • Expanding vocabulary
  • Extending your answer
  • Useful grammar
  • Grammar practice
  • Sentence stress
  • Speaking preparation
  • Speaking: productive stage
  • Giving feedback
  • Port city
  • Port city or harbour
  • Urban landscape
  • Hometown
  • Port city
  • Port city or harbour
  • Urban landscape
  • Hometown
  • Speaking preparation
  • Speaking: productive stage
  • Warm-up
  • Warm-up
  • Warm-up
  • Warm-up
  • Warm-up
  • Warm-up
  1. 1. IELTS|Intermediate|1. Dream city
  2. 2. IELTS|Intermediate|2. Booking an apartment
  3. 3. IELTS|Intermediate|3. Talking about your hometown
  4. 4. IELTS|Intermediate|4. Where to go?
  5. 5. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 1
  6. 6. IELTS|Intermediate|5. Explorer and writer
  7. 7. IELTS|Intermediate|6. Travelling companions
  8. 8. IELTS|Intermediate|7. Family and childhood
  9. 9. IELTS|Intermediate|8. Families around the world
  10. 10. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 2
  11. 11. IELTS|Intermediate|9. Machines in our life
  12. 12. IELTS|Intermediate|10. On board
  13. 13. IELTS|Intermediate|11. Travelling around
  14. 14. IELTS|Intermediate|12. Different ways
  15. 15. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 3
  16. 16. IELTS|Intermediate| 13. Old innovation
  17. 17. IELTS|Intermediate|14. At an exhibition
  18. 18. IELTS|Intermediate|15. Electronic devices
  19. 19. IELTS|Intermediate|16. Inventions
  20. 20. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 4
  21. 21. IELTS|Intermediate|17. Wild animals
  22. 22. IELTS|Intermediate|18. In the zoo
  23. 23. IELTS|Intermediate|19. Animals in our life
  24. 24. IELTS|Intermediate|20. Animal life
  25. 25. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 5
  26. 26. IELTS|Intermediate|21. It makes difference
  27. 27. IELTS|Intermediate|22. Successful people
  28. 28. IELTS|Intermediate|23. Human memory
  29. 29. IELTS|Intermediate|24. Talent and success
  30. 30. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 6
  31. 31. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: reading and speaking
  32. 32. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: listening and writing