IELTS|Intermediate|6. Travelling companions

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Read the quotations and discuss them with your teacher. Choose one which you agree with the most

«Adventure is worthwhile.»

— Aesop

«For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.»

— Robert Louis Stevenson

«Travelling – it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller.»

— Ibn Battuta

«A journey is best measured in friends rather than miles.»

— Tim Cahill

Aesop (/ˈiːsɒp/ EE-sop; Greek: Αἴσωπος, Aisōpos; c. 620 – 564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and story teller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop’s Fables.

Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894) was a British novelist, poet, essayist, and travel writer. His most famous works are Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and A Child’s Garden of Verses.

Muhammad Ibn Battuta or Ibn Baṭūṭah (/ˌɪbənbætˈtuːtɑː/; Arabic: محمد ابن بطوطة‎‎); February 25, 1304 – 1368 or 1369) was a Moroccan scholar who widely travelled the medieval world.

Timothy Filiga Cahill (/ˈkeɪhɪl/; born 6 December 1979) is an Australian professional footballer who plays for A-League club Melbourne City and the Australian national team.

Match the questions with the answers


Listen to four conversations and complete four of the answers to the questions

Conversation 1

Man Woman

Man: Could you give me a contact number, please?
Woman: Sure — I’ll give you my mobile. It’s 07816 038924.
Man: Thanks — we’ll let you know when the glasses are ready.

Conversation 2

Woman Man

Woman: How much is the flight to Madrid?
Man: It’s $349.
Woman: Do you have anything cheaper say, $300?
Man: I’m afraid not.

Conversation 3

Man Girl

Man: How old are you, Maddy?
Girl: I’m 16.
Man: And what date’s your birthday?
Girl: October the 12th.
Man: Good, so we’ll be able to start the driving lessons in the second half of October.
Girl: Yes.

Conversation 4

Man Woman

Man: Shall we see each other later in the coffee bar?
Woman: OK. What time shall we meet?
Man: Um, can you get there by four thirty?
Woman: My maths class finishes at four, so… yes… that should be OK.

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Brainstorm and write down five things people should know how to do when they go on a difficult journey

Look at the notes below and answer the questions

part / timing content test focus
LISTENING approximately 30 minutes
  • four sections
  • 40 questions
  • a range of question types
  • Section 1: a conversation on a social topic, e.g. someone making a booking
  • Section 2: a monologue on a social topic, e.g. a radio report
  • Section 3: a conversation on a study-based topic, e.g. a discussion between students
  • Section 4: a monologue on a study-based topic, e.g. a lecture

Students have ten minutes at the end of the test to transfer their answers onto an answer sheet.

The recording is heard ONCE.

  • Candidates are expected to listen for specific information, main ideas and opinions.
  • There is a range of task types which include completion, matching, labelling and multiple choice.
  • Each question scores 1 mark; candidates receive a band score from 1 to 9.


Listening Band Scores

Your listening scores are calculated by the number of correct answers you have out of the 40 questions in the test. You do not lose points for incorrect answers.

IELTS Listening Scores

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IELTS Listening

Section 1

Exam information

  • You hear a conversation between two people on a social or practical topic.
  • In this section only, you are given an example at the beginning.
  • You write your answers on the questions paper while you listen.
  • You write not more than two words in each gap.
  • You will hear the conversation only once.


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In which gap do you have to:

  • write a number?
  • spell a word?
  • write the name of a place?
  • write a subject of study or a language?
  • write an activity which people do in their spare time?
  • write the name of a job?

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When you listen to the recording, you will often hear a phrase which signals the answer to a question.

Signals will help you to pick up the exact phrase or word which you need to write into the gap.

Match the signal phrases with the gaps

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Listen and complete the notes. Write no more than two words and/or a number for each gap

Clive Debbie

Clive: Hello?
Debbie: Hi, Clive, is that you?
Clive: Yes, hi, Debbie.
Debbie: Did you manage to see those candidates for our expedition?
Clive: Yes, I did, and there was an extra one who was quite a surprise. You know, he hadn’t applied and he just turned up out of the blue, so we haven’t got any details for him.
Debbie: Really? Tell me about him.
Clive: OK, and you can take some notes. Then we’ll see what we think.
Debbie: Fine.
Clive: First, he’s called Sanjay Dubashi.
Debbie: OK. Sanjay is spelled S-A-N-J-A-Y, right?
Clive: Correct. And Dubashi is D-U-B-A-S-H-I.
Debbie: D-U-B-A-S-H-I, fine, thanks, I’m just getting that down. And did you find out how old he is?
Clive: Sure, he’s round about our age, you know — well, a couple of years older, he’s 27, quite a big man, quite muscular, impressive, with a big moustache.
Debbie: And what does he do?
Clive: Well, actually, he just says he’s an office worker, you know, just one of those people with quite a routine job in an office.
Debbie: Mm, doesn’t sound like he finds his job very interesting. Has he got any experience, do you know, of going off to remote places on foot?
Clive: Yes, he’s been all over the place. He was telling me all about a trip he made in a Land Rover across Central Africa from one side to the other, which sounded pretty exciting. And dangerous.
Debbie: Great! I think it would be really interesting to cross Central Africa. I’d love to do that. Anything physical? I mean, where he actually had to walk instead of driving — you know, being so muscular, as you say?
Clive: Mm, I was coming to that. Last year, he went to Russia with some friends in their summer holidays and they went up a mountain. Let’s see, um, Mount Elbrus, it’s called.
Debbie: Wow, now that’s really quite something. By the way, Elbrus is spelled E-L-B-R-O-S, isn’t it?
Clive: Not quite, it’s U-S.
Debbie: Ah, OK… What qualifications does he have which would interest us? Has he done any sort of specialist training, for example?
Clive: Well, he’s done a course in first aid, which may be pretty useful. If any of us get injured, he should know what to do.
Debbie: Good. It might be useful to have someone who knows how to do first aid in case someone has an accident. Can he swim?
Clive: I didn’t ask, now you mention it. I forgot. But he did tell me he can hold conversations in five languages. He’s not fluent in all of them, but he can get by. He grew up in India, and I suppose that helps, you know, for learning languages, though now he lives over here.
Debbie: Right. What else? Has he been to university, for instance?
Clive: Yes, he graduated in media studies, though he says he’s never worked in the media.
Debbie: OK, and when he’s not off on expeditions to remote places, what does he like doing in his spare time?
Clive: He seems to do all sorts of things. One thing he told me which could be useful is that he likes fishing.
Debbie: Yes, we’d better tell him to bring his fishing rod — that is, if we choose him.
Clive: And he seems to spend a lot of time at the gym — he says he really likes to keep fit. And when you meet him, you’ll believe it’s true.
Debbie: Great, another fitness fanatic, like you. Well, sounds like I should meet him, doesn’t it? When can you fix that up?

Match the phrases to make sentences

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Discuss the questions

1. What skills do you have?

2. What skills would you like to have? Why?

3. What skills which are useful for travelling do you have?

Criteria:

  1. answer all the points
  2. keep going for more than a minute
  3. introduce and round off the talk
  4. use some of the signposting phrases
  5. use past tenses correctly
  6. use their notes
  7. sound interested in what they are saying
  8. look at the examiner while speaking

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Read the exam card, make notes and prepare a 2-minute speech

Exam advice

Speaking Part 2

  • Structure your talk by using your notes and introducing your points clearly to the examiner.
  • Use appropriate phrases to mark the stages in your talk.

Speaking part 2

Describe a perfect travelling companion

You should say:

  • what personality traits they should possess;
  • what physical characteristics they should possess;
  • what skills they should possess;
  • explain why it is important.

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Useful language

  • I’d like smb to be able to
  • I want smb to know how to

Read the text and complete the table below

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Choose one word in the order it appears in the text for each answer.

Industries that benefit from tourism

Australia

Domestic travel

Have you ever travelled to another part of your country and stayed for a few days? Travel within one’s own country is popular throughout the world. And, according to a survey carried out in Australia in 2002, travellers are tending to spend more and more money on their holidays.

The Domestic Tourism Expenditure Survey showed that domestic travellers – those travelling within the country – injected $23 billion into the Australian economy in 2002. As a result, domestic tourism became the mainstay of the industry, accounting for 75 per cent of total tourism expenditure in Australia. International tourism, on the other hand, added $7 billion to the economy. Overall, in present dollar terms, Australians spent $7 billion more on domestic tourism in 2002 than they did when the first survey of tourist spending was completed in 1991.

Thus, tourism has become one of Australia’s largest industries. The combined tourist industry now accounts for about 5 per cent of the nation’s gross domestic product, compared with agriculture at 4.3 per cent and manufacturing at 8 per cent. Tourism is, therefore, an important earner for both companies and individuals in a wide range of industries. For example, the transport industry benefits from the extra money poured into it. Hotels spring up in resort areas to provide accommodation, and the catering industry gains as tourists spend money in restaurants. The retail sector benefits as well, as many tourists use their holidays to shop for clothes, accessories and souvenirs.

In most countries, the land is divided into different political areas. Australia is divided into six states and two territories. Since people travel for different reasons, there are significant differences in the length of time people stay in different locations and in the amount they spend while there.

In 2002, Australian residents spent $8.4 billion on day trips and almost twice that amount on trips involving at least one night away from home. In that year, a total of 45 million overnight trips were made in Australia. Of these, 14.9 million were spent in New South Wales, 10.3 million were spent in Queensland, and 9.2 million were spent in Victoria. Fewer nights were spent in the other states, with 3.7 million in South Australia, 1.5 million in Tasmania and 5 million in Western Australia. Despite the popularity of destinations such as Ayers Rock and Kakadu National Park, only 0.4 million overnight stays were recorded in the Northern Territory.

New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria attracted the greatest tourism revenue, with $5.2 billion, $5.1 billion and $3.3 billion spent there respectively. The average expenditure for trips was $395 per person, with accommodation the biggest expenditure, followed by meals and fuel. The survey also showed that costs were higher for inter-state travellers, who each spent an average of $812 per trip compared with $255 for those who travelled within one state. Trips to the Northern Territory were the most expensive, followed by Queensland, with South Australia and Victoria the least.

Comparing the costs of trips for different purposes, the survey found that business trips were the most expensive because they were more likely to involve stays in commercial accommodation. Trips taken for educational reasons – to visit universities, museums etc. – were also expensive, especially as they usually required inter-state plane tickets. Family holidays lay in the medium range, with transport and fares contributing to the cost, but adventure parks the major expense. But while visits to friends and relatives were the least expensive – due to lower accommodation, food and transport costs – these travellers spent most on shopping.

The survey also estimates that Australians made 253 million day trips in 2002, visiting parks, beaches and city attractions. The largest expenses were petrol costs (averaging $10 per day trip), followed by meals, souvenirs and entry fees. Day trips tended to cost the most in the Northern Territory, while South Australia was the cheapest. Overall, the survey found that men travelling alone spent more than any tourist group. In particular, men spent more on transport and meals. Women travelling alone spent the most on clothes, while souvenirs were bought more often by families than by other tourists.

The challenge for the tourism industry now is to encourage Australians to continue spending money on travel and, if possible, to increase the amount they spend.


Complete the sentences below. Choose no more than three words from the text for each answer

Read the text one more time and complete the table below with one or two words

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Australia

Have you ever travelled to another part of your country and stayed for a few days? Travel within one’s own country is popular throughout the world. And, according to a survey carried out in Australia in 2002, travellers are tending to spend more and more money on their holidays.

The Domestic Tourism Expenditure Survey showed that domestic travellers – those travelling within the country – injected $23 billion into the Australian economy in 2002. As a result, domestic tourism became the mainstay of the industry, accounting for 75 per cent of total tourism expenditure in Australia. International tourism, on the other hand, added $7 billion to the economy. Overall, in present dollar terms, Australians spent $7 billion more on domestic tourism in 2002 than they did when the first survey of tourist spending was completed in 1991.

Thus, tourism has become one of Australia’s largest industries. The combined tourist industry now accounts for about 5 per cent of the nation’s gross domestic product, compared with agriculture at 4.3 per cent and manufacturing at 8 per cent. Tourism is, therefore, an important earner for both companies and individuals in a wide range of industries. For example, the transport industry benefits from the extra money poured into it. Hotels spring up in resort areas to provide accommodation, and the catering industry gains as tourists spend money in restaurants. The retail sector benefits as well, as many tourists use their holidays to shop for clothes, accessories and souvenirs.

In most countries, the land is divided into different political areas. Australia is divided into six states and two territories. Since people travel for different reasons, there are significant differences in the length of time people stay in different locations and in the amount they spend while there.

In 2002, Australian residents spent $8.4 billion on day trips and almost twice that amount on trips involving at least one night away from home. In that year, a total of 45 million overnight trips were made in Australia. Of these, 14.9 million were spent in New South Wales, 10.3 million were spent in Queensland, and 9.2 million were spent in Victoria. Fewer nights were spent in the other states, with 3.7 million in South Australia, 1.5 million in Tasmania and 5 million in Western Australia. Despite the popularity of destinations such as Ayers Rock and Kakadu National Park, only 0.4 million overnight stays were recorded in the Northern Territory.

New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria attracted the greatest tourism revenue, with $5.2 billion, $5.1 billion and $3.3 billion spent there respectively. The average expenditure for trips was $395 per person, with accommodation the biggest expenditure, followed by meals and fuel. The survey also showed that costs were higher for inter-state travellers, who each spent an average of $812 per trip compared with $255 for those who travelled within one state. Trips to the Northern Territory were the most expensive, followed by Queensland, with South Australia and Victoria the least.

Comparing the costs of trips for different purposes, the survey found that business trips were the most expensive because they were more likely to involve stays in commercial accommodation. Trips taken for educational reasons – to visit universities, museums etc. – were also expensive, especially as they usually required inter-state plane tickets. Family holidays lay in the medium range, with transport and fares contributing to the cost, but adventure parks the major expense. But while visits to friends and relatives were the least expensive – due to lower accommodation, food and transport costs – these travellers spent most on shopping.

The survey also estimates that Australians made 253 million day trips in 2002, visiting parks, beaches and city attractions. The largest expenses were petrol costs (averaging $10 per day trip), followed by meals, souvenirs and entry fees. Day trips tended to cost the most in the Northern Territory, while South Australia was the cheapest. Overall, the survey found that men travelling alone spent more than any tourist group. In particular, men spent more on transport and meals. Women travelling alone spent the most on clothes, while souvenirs were bought more often by families than by other tourists.

The challenge for the tourism industry now is to encourage Australians to continue spending money on travel and, if possible, to increase the amount they spend.



Complete the sentences below. Choose no more than three words from the text for each answer

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Listen to the conversations and decide if the sentences below are true or false

Rose Jack

Rose: I’d love to go abroad on holiday next spring. What do you think?
Jack: I’m not sure. When were you thinking? In April?
Rose: Maybe. We have two days off work for our national holiday. We could take off another three days and go for a week. We could even go for two!
Jack: No, not two. If I take all my holiday in April, I won’t be able to take a holiday in the summer.
Rose: Okay. One, then.
Jack: Where would you like to go?
Rose: Well, I looked at flights. There aren’t any flights to Greece until May, unfortunately. I’d like to go there. But we can fly to Spain quite cheaply.
Jack: That would be nice. Where would we stay? In a hotel?
Rose: I’m not sure. I don’t really like staying in hotels. But we could hire a cottage.
Jack: I don’t mind either. Is a cottage cheaper than a hotel?
Rose: It’s about the same. But I prefer staying in cottages. It’s more peaceful, and we can cook for ourselves.
Jack: Okay, well, that’s fine by me.
Rose: The problem is transport. You can get to the hotels easily from the airport. They are all in the town centre, and buses go there all the time. But the cottages are further away. We’d need to hire a car.
Jack: That’s fine. I don’t mind doing that. Why don’t you pick out a few cottages, and we’ll choose one?
Rose: I’ve done that already. I’ll show you on the computer. There’s this one — it’s actually an apartment. It’s inside an old palace in this beautiful historic village in the mountains. Isn’t it beautiful?
Jack: It’s quite expensive though. And it has 3 bedrooms. We don’t need that many.
Rose: I suppose not. Okay, what about this one? It’s up in the hills. Very quiet and peaceful. It has a lovely view, look. And it’s not too expensive.
Jack: That looks nice. It’s quite far from the town, but I don’t mind that.
Rose: Nor me. Or there’s this one. It’s a town house. It’s big and it looks lovely inside.
Jack: Does it have a garden?
Rose: No, and it might be noisy, because it’s so central.
Jack: I think I prefer that other one.
Rose: Me too. Shall I write and find out if it’s free?
Jack: Yes, do. If it is, we’ll book the flights.


Read the task and prepare your 2-minute speech on the topic «A tourist attraction I once visited»

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Describe a tourist attraction you once visited. You should say:

  • when you visited it;
  • where it is situated;
  • who you went with;
  • and say what you like the most about it.

Speak no longer than 2 minutes.

Cover all of the points, use the active vocabulary of the lesson:

Wordlist3_IELTS|Int|L6

Useful language

  • I’d like to be able to
  • I want to learn how to
  • I know how to

Exam tip

  1. Structure your talk by using your notes and introducing you points clearly.
  2. Use appropriate phrases to mark the stages in your talk.
  3. Give reasons for your answers.
  4. Offer extra details, extend your answer.
  5. Sound interested in what you are saying.
  6. Speak clearly so that the examiner can hear you easily.
  7. Use wide range of vocabulary.

Allow your browser access to your microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

Read the information about IELTS Writing task 2

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IELTS Writing Task 2. IELTS Essay

During the Exam you should spend about 40 minutes on this task and write at least 250 words.

Essays can be of different kinds: opinion essay, advantages and disadvantages essays, Problem and Solution, Discussion (Discuss both view), Two-part Question.

Read the exam task and the instruction. Plan and write an essay

Some people like to travel with a companion. Other people prefer to travel alone. Which one do you prefer?

Use specific reasons and details to explain your choice.

You should write at least 250 words.

Instruction

  • Firstly, think what you are going to write about.
  • Secondly, brainstorm the advantages and disadvantages of travelling alone and with a companion. Provide the example for each point. Think about the conclusion.
  • Write the plan following the given structure.
  • Using the results of your brainstorming and the plan, write the essay.
  • Follow the structure of the essay and use the given vocabulary.
  • Make sure you have used linking words and phrases to make you essay easy to read and understand.
  • Check your essay.

Plan

Introduction

1 Sentence 1 − Paraphrase question

2 Sentence 2 − Outline sentence

Supporting Paragraph 1 (Advantages)

3 Sentence 3 − Topic sentence (Advantage 1)

4 Sentence 4 − Explain how this is an advantage

5 Sentence 5 − Example

Supporting Paragraph 2 (Disadvantages)

6 Sentence 6 − Topic sentence (Disadvantage 1)

7 Sentence 7 − Explain how this is a disadvantage

8 Sentence 8 − Example

Conclusion

9 Sentence 9 − Summary of main points

For more information refer the following website 🔗IELTS Essay Structures


Wordlist3_IELTS|Int|L6

Useful language

  • I’d like to be able to
  • I want to learn how to
  • I know how to
Урок Homework Курс
  • Warm-up
  • Lead-in
  • Mountain travel
  • Travel questionary
  • Notes completion
  • Useful skills
  • Travelling companion
  • Domestic travelling
  • Australia
  • Planning a vacation
  • Speaking
  • Writing an essay