IELTS|Intermediate|7. Family and childhood

pic2_Business|Upper-Int|L18

Table1_IELTS|Int|L7

pic7_Business|Adults|Advanced|L19

Tick good advice for Speaking Part 1

Listen to the candidate answering some Part 1 questions and tick the things he does

pic15_GE|Ad|Adv|L9

Examiner Hussein

Examiner: So, Hussein, I’m going to ask you some questions about your childhood. Do you come from a large family or a small family?
Hussein: I’m sorry, could you repeat, please?
Examiner: Do you come from a large family or a small family?
Hussein: Well, actually, it’s not large or small, what’s the word, it’s middle… no, no, sorry, it’s medium-sized. I am two brothers… sorry. I have two brothers who are both older than me.
Examiner: As a child, who did you spend more time with, your family or your friends?
Hussein: When I was a small child I spent more time with my family, my mother, who looked after me, and I played a lot with my brothers. Then, when I was a bit older, about ten or 11, I started to play more with friends I made at school because we enjoyed doing the same things, and my mother went back to her job.
Examiner: And when you were a child, how did you spend your free time?
Hussein: I think I watched television quite a lot when I was a small child and I played computer games with my brothers. When I was older I did a lot of sports with my friends. We went swimming and we played tennis and football because I love doing sports.
Examiner: What did you enjoy most about school?
Hussein: I think I enjoyed doing science subjects most. I liked physics and chemistry especially. We didn’t do sports at school, so I did those in my free time.
Examiner: And when you were at school, who do you think was your best teacher?
Hussein: I think, perhaps, my chemistry teacher because she explained things very clearly. Also, she was very — I’m not sure about the word — uh, interested, no, enthusiastic. She made us do tests. I mean experiments in the laboratories, so we learned a lot. I never missed one of her lessons.


Speaking Part 1

  • Do you come from a large family or a small family?
  • As a child, who did you spend more time with, your family or your friends?
  • And when you were a child, how did you spend your free time?
  • What did you enjoy most about school?
  • And when you were at school, who do you think was your best teacher?

Listen again to the candidate answering the first question and answer the questions below

Examiner Hussein

Examiner: So, Hussein, I’m going to ask you some questions about your childhood. Do you come from a large family or a small family?
Hussein: I’m sorry, could you repeat, please?
Examiner: Do you come from a large family or a small family?
Hussein: Well, actually, it’s not large or small, what’s the word, it’s middle… no, no, sorry, it’s medium-sized. I am two brothers… sorry. I have two brothers who are both older than me.


Speaking Part 1

Do you come from a large family or a small family?

1. What does he say when he doesn’t understand the question?

2. What two mistakes does he make?

3. What word does he use when he corrects a mistake?

Listen to the candidate answering the questions and complete the sentences with the words he uses

pic1_Adults|Grammar|Int|L43

Examiner Hussein

Examiner: So, Hussein, I’m going to ask you some questions about your childhood. Do you come from a large family or a small family?
Hussein: I’m sorry, could you repeat, please?
Examiner: Do you come from a large family or a small family?
Hussein: Well, actually, it’s not large or small, what’s the word, it’s middle… no, no, sorry, it’s medium-sized. I am two brothers… sorry. I have two brothers who are both older than me.
Examiner: As a child, who did you spend more time with, your family or your friends?
Hussein: When I was a small child I spent more time with my family, my mother, who looked after me, and I played a lot with my brothers. Then, when I was a bit older, about ten or 11, I started to play more with friends I made at school because we enjoyed doing the same things, and my mother went back to her job.
Examiner: And when you were a child, how did you spend your free time?
Hussein: I think I watched television quite a lot when I was a small child and I played computer games with my brothers. When I was older I did a lot of sports with my friends. We went swimming and we played tennis and football because I love doing sports.
Examiner: What did you enjoy most about school?
Hussein: I think I enjoyed doing science subjects most. I liked physics and chemistry especially. We didn’t do sports at school, so I did those in my free time.
Examiner: And when you were at school, who do you think was your best teacher?
Hussein: I think, perhaps, my chemistry teacher because she explained things very clearly. Also, she was very — I’m not sure about the word — uh, interested, no, enthusiastic. She made us do tests. I mean experiments in the laboratories, so we learned a lot. I never missed one of her lessons.


Decide which sentences above

1. give reasons?

2. explain results or consequences?

Complete the table with the verbs in the Past Simple

pic2_IELTS|Int|L7


Listen to the candidate one more time and check your answers

Examiner Hussein

Examiner: So, Hussein, I’m going to ask you some questions about your childhood. Do you come from a large family or a small family?
Hussein: I’m sorry, could you repeat, please?
Examiner: Do you come from a large family or a small family?
Hussein: Well, actually, it’s not large or small, what’s the word, it’s middle… no, no, sorry, it’s medium-sized. I am two brothers… sorry. I have two brothers who are both older than me.
Examiner: As a child, who did you spend more time with, your family or your friends?
Hussein: When I was a small child I spent more time with my family, my mother, who looked after me, and I played a lot with my brothers. Then, when I was a bit older, about ten or 11, I started to play more with friends I made at school because we enjoyed doing the same things, and my mother went back to her job.
Examiner: And when you were a child, how did you spend your free time?
Hussein: I think I watched television quite a lot when I was a small child and I played computer games with my brothers. When I was older I did a lot of sports with my friends. We went swimming and we played tennis and football because I love doing sports.
Examiner: What did you enjoy most about school?
Hussein: I think I enjoyed doing science subjects most. I liked physics and chemistry especially. We didn’t do sports at school, so I did those in my free time.
Examiner: And when you were at school, who do you think was your best teacher?
Hussein: I think, perhaps, my chemistry teacher because she explained things very clearly. Also, she was very — I’m not sure about the word — uh, interested, no, enthusiastic. She made us do tests. I mean experiments in the laboratories, so we learned a lot. I never missed one of her lessons.


This is the basic past tense. We use it whenever we want to talk about the past and we don’t have any special situation that means we should use the past perfect, present perfect or past continuous.

Finished actions, states or habits in the past.

1: We use it with finished actions, states or habits in the past when we have a finished time word (yesterday, last week, at 2 o’clock, in 2003).

  • I went to the cinema yesterday.
  • We spent a lot of time in Japan in 2007.

2: We use it with finished actions, states or habits in the past when we know from general knowledge that the time period has finished. This includes when the person we are talking about is dead.

  • Leonardo painted the Mona Lisa.
  • The Vikings invaded Britain.

3: We use it with finished actions, states or habits in the past that we have introduced with the present perfect or another tense. This is sometimes called ‘details of news’.

  • I’ve hurt my leg. I fell off a ladder when I was painting my bedroom.
  • I’ve been on holiday. I went to Spain and Portugal.

4: For stories or lists of events, we often use the past simple for the actions in the story and the past continuous for the background.

  • He went to a café. People were chatting and music was playing. He sat down and ordered a coffee.

Unreal or imaginary things in the present or future.

5: We use the past simple to talk about things that are not real in the present or future. So we use it with the second conditional and after words like ‘wish’.

  • If I won the lottery, I would buy a house.
  • I wish I had more time!


It’s similar to the present simple because it has different rules for the verb ‘be’, which becomes ‘was’ or ‘were’:

The Past Simple with ‘be’

Positive with ‘be’ Negative with ‘be’ Negative Short Form
I was cold I was not sleepy I wasn’t sleepy
You were tired You were not on the bus You weren’t on the bus
He was in the garden He was not at school He wasn’t at school
She was late She was not beautiful She wasn’t beautiful
It was sunny It was not cold It wasn’t cold
We were on holiday We were not at work We weren’t at work
They were hungry They were not tired They weren’t tired

To make a question, just like the present simple, we change the position of ‘was / were’ and the subject.

‘Yes / No’ Questions with ‘be’ ‘Wh’ Questions with ‘be’
Was I sleepy? Why was I sleepy?
Were you late? Where were you?
Was he at the cinema? When was he at the cinema?
Was she kind? How was she?
Was it hot? How was it?
Were we hungry? Why were we hungry?
Were they at work? When were they at work?

The Past Simple (Simple Past) with Other Verbs

We make the past simple just like the present simple except we use ‘did’ instead of ‘do / does’. It’s really easy because ‘did’ doesn’t change, even with ‘he / she / it‘.

The positive:

We usually make the positive by adding ‘-ed’ to the infinitive. For example, ‘play’ becomes ‘played’. However, there are some irregular verbs, for example ‘go’ becomes ‘went’ and ‘run’ becomes ‘ran’.

The negative:

In the negative there aren’t any irregular verbs. All verbs use did not (didn’t) + infinitive‘. In the negative there aren’t any irregular verbs. All verbs use ‘did not (didn’t) + infinitive‘.

Positive with other verbs Negative Negative short forms
I walked (regular) I did not walk I didn’t walk
You played (regular) You did not play You didn’t play
He cooked (regular) He did not cook He didn’t cook
She listened (regular) She did not listen She didn’t listen
It rained (regular) It did not rain It didn’t rain
We ate (irregular) We did not eat We didn’t eat
They drank (irregular) They did not drink They didn’t drink

Questions are also very easy. Just put ‘did’ before the subject, and the infinitive after it. To make a ‘wh’ question, of course, put the question word at the beginning of the sentence.

‘Yes / No’ Questions ‘Wh’ Questions
Did I walk? Where did you go?
Did you play? What did you play?
Did he cook? What did he cook?
Did she listen? Why did she listen?
Did it rain? When did it rain?
Did we eat? Where did we eat?
Did they drink? How did they travel?

Correct the mistakes in each of these sentences

pic3_L25|Grammar


Complete the sentences with the past tense of the verbs

Tick the correct verbs according to how -ed is pronounced. Then listen and check

pic2|GE|Adv|L18

Pronunciation of verbs + -ed

When we add -ed to:

  • verbs ending in the sounds /tʃ, /k/, /p/ and /ʃ/, we pronounce -ed as /t/: risked
  • verbs ending in the sounds /d/ and /t/, we pronounce -ed as /id/: stated
  • all other verbs, we pronounce -ed as /d/: entered

appeared, asked, ended, enjoyed, finished, hoped, improved, invented, liked, looked, needed, occurred, played, remembered, started, wanted, watched, wished


Read the sentences paying particular attention to the pronunciation of ending -ed. Say if they are true or false for you

GE_El1_10_6

Think how you can answer the questions using the useful vocabulary on the topic

  1. Do you come from a large family or a small family?
  2. As a child, who did you spend more time with: your family or your friends? Why?
  3. When you were a child, how did you spend your weekends?
  4. What did you enjoy most about school?
  5. When you were at school, who did you think was your best teacher? Why?

Wordlist

1. medium-sized
2. consequence
3. female
4. attendance
5. extended family
6. nuclear family

GE_El1_Pract2_5

Roleplay the exam situation. Discuss the questions with your teacher

Exam tip

  • Listen to the examiner’s questions carefully.
  • Look confidently at the examiner and perhaps smile a little when you answer the questions.
  • Answer the questions openly and, when appropriate, answer with extra details, or a reason.
  • Use a range of vocabulary.
  • Be ready to offer extra information about yourself and try to speak fluently and confidently.
  • Try to express yourself clearly, if you make a mistake, try to correct it.
  1. Do you come from a large family or a small family?
  2. As a child, who did you spend more time with: your family or your friends? Why?
  3. When you were a child, how did you spend your weekends?
  4. What did you enjoy most about school?
  5. When you were at school, who did you think was your best teacher? Why?

IELTS Speaking Assessment Criteria

Below are the marking criteria for IELTS speaking. Click table to enlarge.

Fluency
  • Talking at length
  • Talking without pauses or hesitations
  • Talking without self — correction
  • Able to be understood
  • Using linking devices
Lexical Resource
  • Using a range of words & paraphrasing
  • Using collocations
  • Using less common vocabulary
  • Avoiding errors
Grammar Range & Accuracy
  • Using a range of sentence structures
  • Using a range of grammar tenses
  • Avoiding errors
Pronunciation
  • Able to be understood throughout the test
  • Able to use Intonation
  • Accent does not affect understanding
  • Accurate word and sound pronunciation
🔗IELTS Liz

pic1_Adults|Grammar|El|L33

Answer the questions, fill in the table and discuss the exam tips which you’ve learnt today

  1. Do you think you did well in this task? Why/why not?
  2. What strategies and tips did you use?

  • Listen to the examiner’s questions carefully.
  • Look confidently at the examiner and perhaps smile a little when you answer the questions.
  • Answer the questions openly and, when appropriate, answer with extra details, or a reason.
  • Use a range of vocabulary.
  • Be ready to offer extra information about yourself and try to speak fluently and confidently.

What I knew about Speaking Part 1 before the lesson What I have learnt about Speaking Part 1 What else I would like to know about Speaking Part 1

pic3_IELTS|Int|L7

Read the text and decide which paragraph (A-H) contains the information below

All The Ways Women Are Still Pressured To Put Family Before Career

(A) There’s no denying that women around the world have made great strides toward equality in the past century. One hundred years ago, women in the United States still didn’t have the right to vote, and very few were allowed to pursue higher education or a meaningful career outside of their household duties. Fast forward to today, and more than 70 percent of women between the ages of 20 and 54 are active members of the national workforce. On top of this, 2015 marked the first year when women were, on average, more likely to have a bachelor’s degree than men, and this trend is on the rise.

(B) But despite all this newfound opportunity, the prevailing societal attitudes about what women are historically supposed to value still have a long way to go. That’s why we’ve partnered with SK-II to learn more about all of the ways women are still pressured to stick to outdated gender norms. «Women have won unprecedented rights thanks to the feminist movement, but as a society, we still expect women to prioritize family over career, or even over their own needs,» says Silvia Dutchevici, president and founder of the Critical Therapy Center in New York City. Dutchevici says many women feel pressure to «have it all,» meaning both a thriving career and the perfect family, but that can be very difficult to achieve.

(C) «Most women try to balance work and family,» Dutchevici says, «but that balance is seldom equal.» In fact, she says working mothers ― even those with partners ― often find themselves essentially working two full-time jobs: keeping their career together while doing the brunt of housework, cooking and child-rearing. This happens for a variety of reasons, but societal expectations about the roles of women and men at home are still very much to blame, says Tamra Lashchyk, a Wall Street executive, business coach and author of the book «Lose the Gum: A Survival Guide to Women on Wall Street.»

(D) «No matter how successful she is, the burden of running a household still falls on the woman’s shoulders,» Lashchyk says. «Men get more of a pass when it comes to these duties, especially those that involve children.» Lashchyk says much of this pressure on women to conform to a more domestic lifestyle comes from friends and family.

(E) «In many people’s minds, a woman’s career success pales in comparison to having a family,» she says. «Especially if the woman is single, no matter how great her professional achievements, almost every single one of her conversations with her family will include questions about her romantic life or lack thereof. I could literally tell my family I’d cured cancer and the conversation would still end with, ‘But are you dating anyone?'» While covert societal expectations might contribute to some of this inequality, workplace policies on maternity and paternity leave can hold a lot of the blame.

(F) «Unfortunately, many workplace policies regarding taking time off to care for family do not the changing times,» Dutchevici says. «Both men and women suffer in their careers when they prioritize family, but women carry far harsher punishments. Their choice to take time off and start a family can result in lower pay, and fewer promotions in the future. The right to family leave is not a woman’s issue, it is a society’s issue, a family’s issue.» Lashchyk agrees with this sentiment. «There should be more flexibility and benefits [in the workplace], like longer periods of time for paternity leave.If paternity leave was extended, men could share a greater responsibility in child care, and they could also spend more time bonding with their infant children, which is beneficial for the entire family.

(G) Another less visible way the modern workplace forces women to choose family over career has to do with the fact that women are pushing back pregnancy, says Jeni Mayorskaya, a fertility expert and CEO of Stork Club, an online community for women dedicated to fertility issues. «Compared to our parents, our generation is having children a decade later,» Mayorskaya says. «Unfortunately, when we hit our mid-30s and we’re finally ready for that managing position or that title of a partner at a firm we fought so hard for, we have to think about putting our career on pause and becoming a mom.»

(H) So what can women do to combat these societal pressures? Finding workplaces that offer flexible schedules, work-at-home opportunities and ample maternity and paternity leave is a good first step, but Dr. Neeta Bhushan, an emotional intelligence advocate and author, says women should also learn to put themselves first. «The first step is being mindful of your emotional health in your relationships with others and the relationship you have with yourself,» Bhushan says. «When you put yourself first, you are able to make a bigger impact on your community. This is different than being selfish ― think beyond you. You want to make sure that you are being taken care of so that you can take care of others.»

Read the text one more time and choose the correct answer for each of the questions

All The Ways Women Are Still Pressured To Put Family Before Career

(A) There’s no denying that women around the world have made great strides toward equality in the past century. One hundred years ago, women in the United States still didn’t have the right to vote, and very few were allowed to pursue higher education or a meaningful career outside of their household duties. Fast forward to today, and more than 70 percent of women between the ages of 20 and 54 are active members of the national workforce. On top of this, 2015 marked the first year when women were, on average, more likely to have a bachelor’s degree than men, and this trend is on the rise.

(B) But despite all this newfound opportunity, the prevailing societal attitudes about what women are historically supposed to value still have a long way to go. That’s why we’ve partnered with SK-II to learn more about all of the ways women are still pressured to stick to outdated gender norms. «Women have won unprecedented rights thanks to the feminist movement, but as a society, we still expect women to prioritize family over career, or even over their own needs,» says Silvia Dutchevici, president and founder of the Critical Therapy Center in New York City. Dutchevici says many women feel pressure to «have it all,» meaning both a thriving career and the perfect family, but that can be very difficult to achieve.

(C) «Most women try to balance work and family,» Dutchevici says, «but that balance is seldom equal.» In fact, she says working mothers ― even those with partners ― often find themselves essentially working two full-time jobs: keeping their career together while doing the brunt of housework, cooking and child-rearing. This happens for a variety of reasons, but societal expectations about the roles of women and men at home are still very much to blame, says Tamra Lashchyk, a Wall Street executive, business coach and author of the book «Lose the Gum: A Survival Guide to Women on Wall Street.»

(D) «No matter how successful she is, the burden of running a household still falls on the woman’s shoulders,» Lashchyk says. «Men get more of a pass when it comes to these duties, especially those that involve children.» Lashchyk says much of this pressure on women to conform to a more domestic lifestyle comes from friends and family.

(E) «In many people’s minds, a woman’s career success pales in comparison to having a family,» she says. «Especially if the woman is single, no matter how great her professional achievements, almost every single one of her conversations with her family will include questions about her romantic life or lack thereof. I could literally tell my family I’d cured cancer and the conversation would still end with, ‘But are you dating anyone?'» While covert societal expectations might contribute to some of this inequality, workplace policies on maternity and paternity leave can hold a lot of the blame.

(F) «Unfortunately, many workplace policies regarding taking time off to care for family do not the changing times,» Dutchevici says. «Both men and women suffer in their careers when they prioritize family, but women carry far harsher punishments. Their choice to take time off and start a family can result in lower pay, and fewer promotions in the future. The right to family leave is not a woman’s issue, it is a society’s issue, a family’s issue.» Lashchyk agrees with this sentiment. «There should be more flexibility and benefits [in the workplace], like longer periods of time for paternity leave.If paternity leave was extended, men could share a greater responsibility in child care, and they could also spend more time bonding with their infant children, which is beneficial for the entire family.

(G) Another less visible way the modern workplace forces women to choose family over career has to do with the fact that women are pushing back pregnancy, says Jeni Mayorskaya, a fertility expert and CEO of Stork Club, an online community for women dedicated to fertility issues. «Compared to our parents, our generation is having children a decade later,» Mayorskaya says. «Unfortunately, when we hit our mid-30s and we’re finally ready for that managing position or that title of a partner at a firm we fought so hard for, we have to think about putting our career on pause and becoming a mom.»

(H) So what can women do to combat these societal pressures? Finding workplaces that offer flexible schedules, work-at-home opportunities and ample maternity and paternity leave is a good first step, but Dr. Neeta Bhushan, an emotional intelligence advocate and author, says women should also learn to put themselves first. «The first step is being mindful of your emotional health in your relationships with others and the relationship you have with yourself,» Bhushan says. «When you put yourself first, you are able to make a bigger impact on your community. This is different than being selfish ― think beyond you. You want to make sure that you are being taken care of so that you can take care of others.»


pic4_IELTS|Int|L7

Listen to the audio and answer the following questions in no more than three words

Cath Neil Mike Else

Cath: Hello and welcome to 6-minute English. I’m Catherine.
Neil: And I’m Neil. Do you realize, Catherine, that we are related to each other?
Cath: Don’t be silly, Neil. I think I’d know if you were in my family.
Neil: Uhm, well, we’ll talk more about that later in the show, but I should say at this point that today we’re discussing genealogy – or the study of family history. And I think it’s pretty fascinating stuff. Do you ever watch the TV programme. Who do you think you are, Catherine? You know, where celebrities find out about their family history?
Cath: Yeah, I’ve seen a couple of them. For example, one celebrity – who was very proud of his working-class London roots – or origins – discovered that he’s actually a direct descendant of an English king.
Neil: Well, that’s quite a discovery. The thing is though, Catherine, what if there isn’t anything exciting in your family history? No mysteries, no skeletons in the closet?
Cath: Well, I reckon, if you go back far enough, Neil, there’s always something exciting or unexpected in anybody’s family history. And ‘skeletons in the closet’, by the way, means secrets. Now, I think it’s time for today’s quiz question. Researching family history often involves reading old documents, such as birth, marriage and death certificates. And these can be difficult to decipher – or understand. So, what’s the name for the study of ancient handwriting? Is it a. scriptography; b. paleography or c. scribology?
Neil: Ah, well, it must be a. scriptography!
Cath: And we’ll see if you’re right or not later on in the show. Now, why do you think most people look into their genealogy, Neil? Is it just curiosity?
Neil: Well, Catherine, we all love a good mystery story. Especially, if it’s connected with our own family. And these days it’s easy to do research online, because many old paper documents have been digitized and are available online!
Cath: BBC presenter Mike Williams investigated his own family history. And here he’s talking about his great-grandfather’s story. And if you listen very carefully, you can hear him rustling the real paper documents!
Mike: The Williamses are my father’s side and on my mother’s the Heino’s – is the name that we think comes from Finland. If I look at this document here – it’s a copy of the census of England and Wales, 1911 – you can see my grandfather, his son and his father, the head of the household. Michael Heino or Mikkel Heino, who – the family lore has it – jumped ship and ended up in Liverpool.
Neil: What’s a census, Catherine?
Cath: It’s an official count of people in a population. So, Mike Williams’ great-grandfather appeared on the 1911 census for England & Wales, but because of his surname the family think he might originally have come from Finland.
Neil: The exciting event in Mike Williams’ history passed down through family lore – which means knowledge passed on from one generation to the next – is that his great-grandfather jumped ship.
Cath: Which means he left the ship he was working on without permission to do so.
Neil: Mhmm, and he started a new life in England. I suppose, quite a few people have immigration stories in their family histories. Sometimes, without knowing it.
Cath: Actually, that’s something that many people are fascinated by. And it has also become easier to investigate these days now companies offer to test the DNA in your saliva for as little as a $100.
Neil: And then they come up with results saying that you’re related to Alexander the Great or Brad Pitt. Remember I said that we were related? Well, let’s now listen to Else Churchill from the Society of Genealogists here in London, who explains what I meant.
Else: There’s what you might call the ‘gateway ancestor’. And the idea of history and genealogy is that’s normally somebody that’s so well — documented that their descendants are well-known. In England, it’s someone like Edward III. And we’re all probably descended from Edward III. Isn’t it nice to have royal ancestors? Well, millions of people are descended from Edward III. And so, in that sense, that’s where the connection might be. So the chances are lots and lots of people are distantly connected to each other.
Cath: As Churchill says, it’s likely that millions of us are distantly related to a gateway ancestor like King Edward III of England. And that means that all those people related to Edward III are also distantly related to each other. So, it seems that paying a company a $100 to reveal that you’re related to Edward III is a waste of money.
Neil: Yes, in the sense that it is you and millions of other people. And, in fact, we’re all related to each other somehow via Edward III or someone else.
Cath: Mhmm, and another popular finding for British people is to say that you’re descended from the Vikings. And again, this is true for lots of people, so it isn’t particularly meaningful.
Neil: If you’re descended from a person or a group, it means they are among your ancestors.
Cath: Now, remember I asked what’s the name of the study of ancient handwriting? Is it a. scriptography; b. paleography or c. scribology?
Neil: And I said a. scriptography. And I’m pretty confident that’s the right answer.
Cath: Well, Neil, you’re pretty confident, but unfortunately it was wrong. The correct answer is b. paleography. Paleography is a study of ancient and historical handwriting, including the practice of deciphering, reading and dating historical manuscipts.
Neil: Oh well, here are the words we learned: genealogy, roots, skeletons in the closet, decipher, census, family lore, descended from.
Cath: And that’s the end of today’s 6-minute English. Don’t forget to join us again soon. Bye!
Neil: Goodbye!

Read the task and prepare your 2-minute speech on the topic «Family and childhood»

pic9_Adults|Grammar|El|L35

Speak no longer than 2 minutes.

Cover all of the points, use the active vocabulary of the lesson.

  1. When you were a child did you live in a big or small family?
  2. What did your family do?
  3. What family members did you live with?
  4. Did you live with your parents?
  5. Would you like to spend more time with your family?
  6. What does your family usually do at weekends?
  7. Did you like going out with your family? Why?
  8. Do you usually have a family get-together?
  9. Do you often see your family at weekends?

  1. Structure your talk by using your notes and introducing your points clearly.
  2. Use appropriate phrases to mark the stages in your talk.
  3. Give reasons for your answers.
  4. Offer extra details, extend your answer.
  5. Sound interested in what you are saying.
  6. Speak clearly so that the examiner can hear you easily.
  7. Use wide range of vocabulary.


Wordlist

1. medium-sized
2. consequence
3. female
4. attendance
5. extended family
6. nuclear family


Allow your browser access to your microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

  • Warm-up
  • Good answers
  • Good speaker
  • Useful vocabulary
  • Useful grammar
  • Grammar practice
  • Pronunciation of -ed
  • Speaking preparation
  • Productive speaking
  • Giving feedback
  • Family or career
  • What to choose?
  • Family history
  • Speaking
  • Family or career
  • What to choose?
  • Family history
  • Speaking
  1. 1. IELTS|Intermediate|1. Dream city
  2. 2. IELTS|Intermediate|2. Booking an apartment
  3. 3. IELTS|Intermediate|3. Talking about your hometown
  4. 4. IELTS|Intermediate|4. Where to go?
  5. 5. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 1
  6. 6. IELTS|Intermediate|5. Explorer and writer
  7. 7. IELTS|Intermediate|6. Travelling companions
  8. 8. IELTS|Intermediate|7. Family and childhood
  9. 9. IELTS|Intermediate|8. Families around the world
  10. 10. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 2
  11. 11. IELTS|Intermediate|9. Machines in our life
  12. 12. IELTS|Intermediate|10. On board
  13. 13. IELTS|Intermediate|11. Travelling around
  14. 14. IELTS|Intermediate|12. Different ways
  15. 15. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 3
  16. 16. IELTS|Intermediate| 13. Old innovation
  17. 17. IELTS|Intermediate|14. At an exhibition
  18. 18. IELTS|Intermediate|15. Electronic devices
  19. 19. IELTS|Intermediate|16. Inventions
  20. 20. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 4
  21. 21. IELTS|Intermediate|17. Wild animals
  22. 22. IELTS|Intermediate|18. In the zoo
  23. 23. IELTS|Intermediate|19. Animals in our life
  24. 24. IELTS|Intermediate|20. Animal life
  25. 25. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 5
  26. 26. IELTS|Intermediate|21. It makes difference
  27. 27. IELTS|Intermediate|22. Successful people
  28. 28. IELTS|Intermediate|23. Human memory
  29. 29. IELTS|Intermediate|24. Talent and success
  30. 30. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 6
  31. 31. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: reading and speaking
  32. 32. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: listening and writing