IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 3

pic4|GE|Adults|Intermediate|L20

Before the lesson, think about these questions and revise the vocabulary

What are the most popular means of transport?

Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|L9

Useful language

  • means of transport
  • renewable energy
  • zero emissions
  • to be powered
  • charge point
  • to be topped up

When and where did you travel last by ship, boat or ferry?

Wordlist

Wordlist1_Revision3|IELTS|Int

Useful language

  • a reclining seat
  • caters
  • an overnight trip

What activities can you do while having rest at the seaside?

Wordlist

1. engine
2. coast
3. desert
4. in all

Useful language

to have great memories of something
to make something with
The bad/good thing is …
The good/bad thing about something is …
The transport somebody used was …

 

What is the best way to present the information about the use of transport?

Wordlist

1. average
2. summarise
3. relevant
4. comparison
5. steady
6. commuting
7. commuter train
8. car sharing
9. carbon dioxide

Revise the grammar rules

Comparatives and Superlatives

Intermediate

Mike is very fast. Jason is faster than Mike, and Paul is faster than both of them. Paul is the fastest.

Examples

Alice is 7, Luke is 16, Beth is 28 and Andy is 69. Luke is older than Alice, but younger than Beth. Beth is older than Alice and Luke, but younger than Andy. Alice is younger than everyone, she is the youngest. Andy is the oldest, he is older than everyone.

Forms

Adjectives

Table1_IELTS|Int|Revision 3

Adverbs

Table 2_IELTS|Int|Revision 3

Table 3_IELTS|Int|Revision 3

Usage

Table 4_IELTS|Int|Revision 3

Revise the exam format

IELTS Reading

Section 1

Exam information

  • Section 1: a passage with 13 questions.
  • Candidates are expected to read for/understand specific information, main ideas, gist and opinions.

Exam advice

Labelling a diagram

  • Find where the picture(s) is/are dealt with in the passage.
  • Find words in the passage that mean the same as the words already on the diagram.
  • Decide what type(s) of word you need for each gap.
  • Underline the word(s) you need in the passage and copy it/them exactly.

IELTS Listening

Section 2

  • А monologue on a social topic, e.g. an announcement.
  • You write your answers on the questions paper while you listen.
  • You will hear the conversation only once.Exam advice

Labelling a diagram

  • Look at the diagram and decide what type(s) of word you need.
  • Look at the words on the diagram and listen for similar words and phrases to tell you the answer is coming.

IELTS Speaking

Section 2

Exam information

  • You speak for between one and two minutes on a topic the examiner gives you.
  • You have one minute to think and write some notes before you speak.Exam advice

Speaking Part 2

  • Structure your talk by using your notes and introducing your points clearly to the examiner.
  • Use appropriate phrases to mark the stages in your talk.

 

IELTS Writing

Section 1

Exam information

  • For Writing Task 1, you write a summary of information from graphs, tables, charts or diagrams.
  • You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.Exam advice

Writing Task 1

  • Think about and analyse the information in the chart(s) and table(s) before you write.
  • Organise the information into paragraphs and include a general overview.
  • Make sure that you compare information in the chart(s) and table(s).


You will be able to:

  • check your skills of dealing with labelling a diagram tasks in Listening Section 2 IELTS Exam;
  • check your speaking skills while answering questions in Speaking Section 2 IELTS Exam;
  • check your skills of dealing with labelling a diagram tasks in Reading Section 1 IELTS Exam;
  • check your skills of describing a table in Writing Section 1 IELTS Exam;
  • revise the rules about comparative and superlative degrees of adjectives;
  • revise the vocabulary on the topics «Transport», «At the seaside».

Exam tips

Multiple choice

  1. Underline key ideas in the questions and use them to help you follow the conversation.
  2. Listen carefully to everything the speakers say in relation to the key idea before you choose your answer.
  3. Although you may hear the words in the options, the speaker may be expressing the opposite idea.
  4. Listen for synonyms or paraphrases of the words in the question.

Labelling a diagram

  1. Read the title to know what you are going to be listening about.
  2. If there is more than one diagram, compare the features in each one.
  3. Decide what information you need for each gap.

Listen to a podcast for visitors to the popular holiday region called the Treloar Valley and do the task below

listen and write

Listen to a podcast for visitors to the popular holiday region called the Treloar Valley and do the task below

Valley and estuary of the River Treloar forms an unspoilt, beautiful landscape, rich in both wildlife and sites of historic interest. There are many ways to explore the area, and public transport links are good. It is possible to leave your car behind, and travel by boat, train or bus, with just short walks in-between stops.

The Treloar Valley Passenger Ferry runs between villages along the river estuary, and provides a link with the train station at Berry, which is about ten minutes’ walk from the riverside village of Calton. In the past, the river was the main form of transport in the area, and as in the past, today’s ferry service operates according to nature. The river estuary is tidal, and so the ferry timetable differs from day to day, according to the times and height of the tide. The ferry is also seasonal, normally running between April and September, depending on the weather. A timetable for the whole year can be downloaded from the internet by visiting www dot treloarferry dot co dot uk.

If you just want to sit and relax, and enjoy the lovely scenery, you can take a river cruise to Calton and back from the nearby city of Plymouth. In the past, steam ships brought early tourists along the same route — Queen Victoria and her family enjoyed such a trip in eighteen fifty six. The journey is quicker these days — the round trip takes between four and five hours, depending on tides and weather. If you prefer, you can travel upriver by boat and return to Plymouth by train. All cruise boats and trains have wheelchair access. For more information, and for departure times, ring Plymouth Boat Cruises on zero one seven, five two eight, two three one zero four.

Trains run several times a day throughout the year between Calton and Plymouth, with various stops in-between. They are used by both local commuters and tourists who want to enjoy the beautiful scenery. The highlight of the journey is crossing the river on the stunning viaduct, which was built at the beginning of the twentieth century, and towers one hundred and twenty feet over the water. It is unnecessary to book, and tickets can be bought on the train. For information about fares and timetables, contact National Rail Enquiries by phone or online.

The bus service in the Treloar Valley now connects all train stations and villages in the area. Specially for holiday makers, there’s a ‘Rover’ ticket which can be used at weekends and on national holidays, and allows unlimited journeys on those days. The Rover ticket provides great value for money, and is now even cheaper than it was last year. An adult ticket costs five pounds fifty a day, Senior Citizens can travel for four pounds fifty, and a family ticket for up to five people costs just twelve pounds. Tickets can be bought on the bus.

At the centre of the Treloar Estuary area is the historic riverside village of Calton. The main road comes into the village from the south, and for those of you who are arriving by bus, it turns left just before the bridge and stops in the lay-by on the left hand side. From there it’s just a short walk to Calton’s various attractions. If you’re arriving by car, you have to leave it in the main car park. Go over the bridge and take the first turning on the right. Then go on until you come to the end of that road. It’s the only place to park in Calton but there’s no charge. If you’re interested in local history, there’s a museum in Calton with farming, fishing and household implements from the late nineteenth century. As you come in from the south, cross the river and go straight on the same road until you reach the end. Also on the subject of history, you can go and see the old mill which has recently been renovated and put back into use. Turn left before you come to the bridge. Then go straight on and then take the first turning on the right. This leads straight there. If you’re interested in arts and crafts, there’s a potter’s studio where you can watch the artist at work. After crossing the bridge turn left and it’s the second building on the left. Finally, when you feel in need of refreshments, there’s a cafe opposite the old boat house, and a picnic area near the mill.


Questions 1-4. Choose the correct answer


Questions 5-10. Label the map below

pic1_IELTS|Int|Revison 3

Read the passage and label the diagram below

IELTS Reading

Section 1

Exam information

  • Section 1: a passage with 13 questions.
  • Candidates are expected to read for/understand specific information, main ideas, gist and opinions.

Exam advice

Labelling a diagram

  • Find where the picture(s) is/are dealt with in the passage.
  • Find words in the passage that mean the same as the words already on the diagram.
  • Decide what type(s) of word you need for each gap.
  • Underline the word(s) you need in the passage and copy it/them exactly.

pic2_IELTS|Int|Revison 3

The construction of roads and bridges

Roads

Although there were highway links in Mesopotamia from as early as 3500 BC, the Romans were probably the first road-builders with fixed engineering standards. At the peak of the Roman Empire in the first century AD, Rome had road connections totalling about 85,000 kilometres.

Roman roads were constructed with a deep stone surface for stability and load-bearing. They had straight alignments and therefore were often hilly. The Roman roads remained the main arteries of European transport for many centuries, and even today many roads follow the Roman routes. New roads were generally of inferior quality, and the achievements of Roman builders were largely unsurpassed until the resurgence of road-building in the eighteenth century.

With horse-drawn coaches in mind, eighteenth-century engineers preferred to curve their roads to avoid hills. The road surface was regarded as merely a face to absorb wear, the load-bearing strength being obtained from a properly prepared and well-drained foundation. Immediately above this, the Scottish engineer John McAdam (1756-1836) typically laid crushed stone, to which stone dust mixed with water was added, and which was compacted to a thickness of just five centimetres, and then rolled. McAdam’s surface layer – hot tar onto which a layer of stone chips was laid – became known as ‘tarmacadam’, or tarmac. Roads of this kind were known as flexible pavements.

By the early nineteenth century – the start of the railway age – men such as John McAdam and Thomas Telford had created a British road network totalling some 200,000 km, of which about one sixth was privately owned toll roads called turnpikes. In the first half of the nineteenth century, many roads in the US were built to the new standards, of which the National Pike from West Virginia to Illinois was perhaps the most notable.

In the twentieth century, the ever-increasing use of motor vehicles threatened to break up roads built to nineteenth-century standards, so new techniques had to be developed.

On routes with heavy traffic, flexible pavements were replaced by rigid pavements, in which the top layer was concrete, 15 to 30 centimetres thick, laid on a prepared bed. Nowadays steel bars are laid within the concrete. This not only restrains shrinkage during setting, but also reduces expansion in warm weather. As a result, it is possible to lay long slabs without danger of cracking.

The demands of heavy traffic led to the concept of high-speed, long-distance roads, with access – or slip-lanes – spaced widely apart. The US Bronx River Parkway of 1925 was followed by several variants – Germany’s autobahns and the Pan American Highway. Such roads – especially the intercity autobahns with their separate multi-lane carriageways for each direction – were the predecessors of today’s motorways.

Bridges

The development by the Romans of the arched bridge marked the beginning of scientific bridge-building; hitherto, bridges had generally been crossings in the form of felled trees or flat stone blocks. Absorbing the load by compression, arched bridges are very strong. Most were built of stone, but brick and timber were also used. A fine early example is at Alcantara in Spain, built of granite by the Romans in AD 105 to span the River Tagus. In modern times, metal and concrete arched bridges have been constructed. The first significant metal bridge, built of cast iron in 1779, still stands at Ironbridge in England.

Steel, with its superior strength-to-weight ratio, soon replaced iron in metal bridge-work. In the railway age, the truss (or girder) bridge became popular. Built of wood or metal, the truss beam consists of upper and lower horizontal booms joined by vertical or inclined members.

The suspension bridge has a deck supported by suspenders that drop from one or more overhead cables. It requires strong anchorage at each end to resist the inward tension of the cables, and the deck is strengthened to control distortion by moving loads or high winds. Such bridges are nevertheless light, and therefore the most suitable for very long spans. The Clifton Suspension Bridge in the UK, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806—59) to span the Avon Gorge in England, is famous both for its beautiful setting and for its elegant design. The 1998 Akashi Kaikyo Bridge in Japan has a span of 1,991 metres, which is the longest to date.

Cantilever bridges, such as the 1889 Forth Rail Bridge in Scotland, exploit the potential of steel construction to produce a wide clearwater space. The spans have a central supporting pier and meet midstream. The downward thrust, where the spans meet, is countered by firm anchorage of the spans at their other ends. Although the suspension bridge can span a wider gap, the cantilever is relatively stable, and this was important for nineteenth-century railway builders. The world’s longest cantilever span – 549 metres – is that of the Quebec rail bridge in Canada, constructed in 1918.


Choose no more than two words and/or a number from the passage for each answer.

pic3_IELTS|Int|Revison 3


Decide if the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage

True — if the statement agrees with the information

False — if the statement contradicts the information

Not given — if there is no information on this

Exam tip

Table/Note completion

  • Use the title to find the right place in the passage.
  • Look for words and phrases in the passage which mean the same as the words and phrases in the table, then read around these words carefully.
  • Copy the words from the passage into the table exactly as you see them.

Read the passage one more time and complete the table below

The construction of roads and bridges

Roads

Although there were highway links in Mesopotamia from as early as 3500 BC, the Romans were probably the first road-builders with fixed engineering standards. At the peak of the Roman Empire in the first century AD, Rome had road connections totalling about 85,000 kilometres.

Roman roads were constructed with a deep stone surface for stability and load-bearing. They had straight alignments and therefore were often hilly. The Roman roads remained the main arteries of European transport for many centuries, and even today many roads follow the Roman routes. New roads were generally of inferior quality, and the achievements of Roman builders were largely unsurpassed until the resurgence of road-building in the eighteenth century.

With horse-drawn coaches in mind, eighteenth-century engineers preferred to curve their roads to avoid hills. The road surface was regarded as merely a face to absorb wear, the load-bearing strength being obtained from a properly prepared and well-drained foundation. Immediately above this, the Scottish engineer John McAdam (1756-1836) typically laid crushed stone, to which stone dust mixed with water was added, and which was compacted to a thickness of just five centimetres, and then rolled. McAdam’s surface layer – hot tar onto which a layer of stone chips was laid – became known as ‘tarmacadam’, or tarmac. Roads of this kind were known as flexible pavements.

By the early nineteenth century – the start of the railway age – men such as John McAdam and Thomas Telford had created a British road network totalling some 200,000 km, of which about one sixth was privately owned toll roads called turnpikes. In the first half of the nineteenth century, many roads in the US were built to the new standards, of which the National Pike from West Virginia to Illinois was perhaps the most notable.

In the twentieth century, the ever-increasing use of motor vehicles threatened to break up roads built to nineteenth-century standards, so new techniques had to be developed.

On routes with heavy traffic, flexible pavements were replaced by rigid pavements, in which the top layer was concrete, 15 to 30 centimetres thick, laid on a prepared bed. Nowadays steel bars are laid within the concrete. This not only restrains shrinkage during setting, but also reduces expansion in warm weather. As a result, it is possible to lay long slabs without danger of cracking.

The demands of heavy traffic led to the concept of high-speed, long-distance roads, with access – or slip-lanes – spaced widely apart. The US Bronx River Parkway of 1925 was followed by several variants – Germany’s autobahns and the Pan American Highway. Such roads – especially the intercity autobahns with their separate multi-lane carriageways for each direction – were the predecessors of today’s motorways.

Bridges

The development by the Romans of the arched bridge marked the beginning of scientific bridge-building; hitherto, bridges had generally been crossings in the form of felled trees or flat stone blocks. Absorbing the load by compression, arched bridges are very strong. Most were built of stone, but brick and timber were also used. A fine early example is at Alcantara in Spain, built of granite by the Romans in AD 105 to span the River Tagus. In modern times, metal and concrete arched bridges have been constructed. The first significant metal bridge, built of cast iron in 1779, still stands at Ironbridge in England.

Steel, with its superior strength-to-weight ratio, soon replaced iron in metal bridge-work. In the railway age, the truss (or girder) bridge became popular. Built of wood or metal, the truss beam consists of upper and lower horizontal booms joined by vertical or inclined members.

The suspension bridge has a deck supported by suspenders that drop from one or more overhead cables. It requires strong anchorage at each end to resist the inward tension of the cables, and the deck is strengthened to control distortion by moving loads or high winds. Such bridges are nevertheless light, and therefore the most suitable for very long spans. The Clifton Suspension Bridge in the UK, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806—59) to span the Avon Gorge in England, is famous both for its beautiful setting and for its elegant design. The 1998 Akashi Kaikyo Bridge in Japan has a span of 1,991 metres, which is the longest to date.

Cantilever bridges, such as the 1889 Forth Rail Bridge in Scotland, exploit the potential of steel construction to produce a wide clearwater space. The spans have a central supporting pier and meet midstream. The downward thrust, where the spans meet, is countered by firm anchorage of the spans at their other ends. Although the suspension bridge can span a wider gap, the cantilever is relatively stable, and this was important for nineteenth-century railway builders. The world’s longest cantilever span – 549 metres – is that of the Quebec rail bridge in Canada, constructed in 1918.


Use one word only from the passage for each answer.

Read the task and make notes for a minute on the topic «Means of transport»

pic10_GE|Upper-Int|L5

Exam tips

Speaking Part 2

1. Use a range of strategies – such as giving reasons and examples, talking about the point you can say most about first, quoting someone else, referring back to something you have already mentioned, etc. – to help you speak for the full two minutes.

2. Use a range of advanced grammatical structures to raise your score.

Means of transport

Describe your favourite means of transport.

You should say:

  • what it is,
  • when and how often you use it,
  • why you use it,

and explain why it is your favourite transport.

Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|L9

Useful language

  • means of transport
  • renewable energy
  • zero emissions
  • benefit
  • to be powered
  • charge point
  • to be topped up

Allow your browser the access to the microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

Speak on the topic no longer than 2 minutes. You have 3 attempts to answer this question.

Cover all of the points and provide a relevant answer.

Look at the task, process the table and identify the key stages. Think of the vocabulary to describe them

GE_Beg_22_6

Writing Task 1

The table below shows the percentage of journeys made by different forms of transport in four countries.

Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

Write at least 150 words.

Journeys made by Canada Belgium Germany the Netherlands
Car 90% 72% 68% 47%
Bicycle 1% 2% 2% 26%
Public transport 3% 12% 18% 8%
On foot 5% 11% 11% 18%
Other 1% 3% 1% 1%

Write your answer to the Writing task above in about 20 minutes. Your answer should be at least 150 words long

Writing Task 1

  1. Describe key stages in the process in a logical order making comparisons where appropriate.
  2. Use suitable words and phrases to structure and link the process clearly.
  3. Remember to include an overview summarising the main features of the process.
  4. Vary your vocabulary and use your own words as far as possible (e.g. do not lift long phrases from the task instructions).


Instructions

  1. Read the Exam task carefully. If necessary make use of Exam tips.
  2. Plan what you are going to write about.
  3. Write the text according to your plan.
  4. Check your writing.
  5. Please use 🔗Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.

Wordlist

Wordlist2_IELTS|Int|Revision 3

Useful language

  • the table shows
  • the third/second … largest group
  • the number of people
  • the largest percentage
  • means of transport

If you open the lesson plan you will be able to assign separate pages as homework or all the homework pages at once.

  • Revise the vocabulary
  • Revise the grammar
  • My achievements
  • Treloar Valley
  • Roads
  • Bridges
  • Means of transport
  • Journeys
  • Homework
  1. 1. IELTS|Intermediate|1. Dream city
  2. 2. IELTS|Intermediate|2. Booking an apartment
  3. 3. IELTS|Intermediate|3. Talking about your hometown
  4. 4. IELTS|Intermediate|4. Where to go?
  5. 5. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 1
  6. 6. IELTS|Intermediate|5. Explorer and writer
  7. 7. IELTS|Intermediate|6. Travelling companions
  8. 8. IELTS|Intermediate|7. Family and childhood
  9. 9. IELTS|Intermediate|8. Families around the world
  10. 10. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 2
  11. 11. IELTS|Intermediate|9. Machines in our life
  12. 12. IELTS|Intermediate|10. On board
  13. 13. IELTS|Intermediate|11. Travelling around
  14. 14. IELTS|Intermediate|12. Different ways
  15. 15. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 3
  16. 16. IELTS|Intermediate| 13. Old innovation
  17. 17. IELTS|Intermediate|14. At an exhibition
  18. 18. IELTS|Intermediate|15. Electronic devices
  19. 19. IELTS|Intermediate|16. Inventions
  20. 20. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 4
  21. 21. IELTS|Intermediate|17. Wild animals
  22. 22. IELTS|Intermediate|18. In the zoo
  23. 23. IELTS|Intermediate|19. Animals in our life
  24. 24. IELTS|Intermediate|20. Animal life
  25. 25. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 5
  26. 26. IELTS|Intermediate|21. It makes difference
  27. 27. IELTS|Intermediate|22. Successful people
  28. 28. IELTS|Intermediate|23. Human memory
  29. 29. IELTS|Intermediate|24. Talent and success
  30. 30. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 6
  31. 31. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: reading and speaking
  32. 32. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: listening and writing