IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 5

pic1_IELTS|Int|Revision 5

Before the lesson, think about these questions and revise the vocabulary

1. What wild animals can be found in the area where you live?

2. Are all wild animals dangerous?

Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|L17


1. What is your attitude towards zoos?

2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of zoos?

Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|L18


1. What roles do animals play in human life?

2. What would our life be like without animals?

Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|L19


1. What factors do the population and variety of animals in the world depend on?

2. What function do animals perform in our ecosystem?

Wordlist

1. herbivore

2. buffalo

3. rainfall

4. increase

5. decrease

6. fall

7. rise

8. drop

9. go up


Describe an animal which you like a lot.

  • To understand the role of …
  • Firstly, … and the links of this idea with/to …
  • Next, it closely examines … in relation to …
  • Finally, it focuses on … and how this affects …
  • One aspect which illustrates … can be identified as …
  • The current debate about … identifies an interesting viewpoint on …
  • This first/next/final section … provides a general discussion of …
  • Building on from the idea that … , this section illustrates that … .
  • To further understand the role of, … this section explores the idea that …
  • Another line of thought on … demonstrates that …
  • However, another angle on this debate suggests that …
  • In contrast to evidence which presents the view that … , an alternative perspective illustrates that …
  • However, not all research shows that … . Some evidence agrees that …
  • This evidence highlights that …
  • There is general agreement that …
  • The strength of such an approach is that …
  • Clearly, … has shown that the main factors which impact upon … are …
  • The evidence has shown that …
  • To conclude, …
  • I love …
  • I’m not sure how you say this, but …
  • I’m quite keen on …
  • I hate …
  • I don’t know what their name is in English …
  • I’m not too keen on … , either.
  • That’s a difficult question. I’m not sure.
  • It’s difficult to say.
  • What is … called?

Grammar

Revise the grammar rules

Countable and Uncountable 1

A noun can be countable or uncountable:

Countable Uncountable
I eat a banana every day. I eat rice every day.
I like bananas. I like rice.
Banana is a countable noun. Rice is an uncountable noun.
A countable noun can be singular (banana) or plural (bananas). An uncountable noun has only one form (rice).
We can use numbers with countable nouns. So we can say «one banana», «two bananas», etc. We cannot use numbers with uncountable nouns. We cannot say «one rice», «two rices», etc.
Examples of nouns usually countable: Examples of nouns usually uncountable:
Kate was singing a song. Kate was listening to (some) music.
There’s a nice beach near here. There’s sand in my shoes.
Do you have a ten-pound note? Do you have any money?
It wasn’t your fault. It was an accident. It wasn’t your fault. It was bad luck.
There are no batteries in the radio. There is no electricity in this house.
We don’t have enough cups. We don’t have enough water.

You can use a/an with singular countable nouns: You cannot normally use a/an with uncountable nouns. We do not say «a sand»,»a music», «a rice».
a beach / a student / an umbrella But you can often use a … of. For example: a bowl / a packet / a grain of rice
You cannot use singular countable nouns alone (without a/the/my etc.): You can use uncountable nouns alone (without the/my/some etc.):
I want a banana. (not I want banana) I eat rice every day.
There’s been an accident. (not There’s been accident) There’s blood on your shirt.

Can you hear music?

You can use plural countable nouns alone:
I like bananas. (= bananas in general)
Accidents can be prevented.

You can use some and any with plural countable nouns: You can use some and any with uncountable nouns:
We sang some songs. We listened to some music.
Did you buy any apples? Did you buy any apple juice?
We use many and few with plural countable nouns: We use much and little with uncountable nouns:
We didn’t take many pictures. We didn’t do much shopping.
I have a few things to do. I have a little work to do.

Attachments




Revise the exam format

pic3_IELTS|Int|L19

Section 1

Exam information

  • Section 1: a passage with 13 questions
  • Candidates are expected to read for / understand specific information, main ideas, gist and opinions.

Exam advice

Sentence completion

  • Underline the key words in each question.
  • Decide what type of information you need to complete the sentence.
  • Read the section of the passage which deals with the key idea and choose your answer.
  • Read the completed sentence to make sure it is grammatically correct.


Section 2

Exam information

  • You hear a monologue on a social or practical topic.
  • You write your answers on the questions paper while you listen.
  • You will hear the monologue only once.

Exam advice

  • Before you listen, read the table to see what information you are given and what information you need.
  • You hear the answers in the same order as the questions in the table.

Exam advice

Labelling a map or plan

Before you listen, check where each of the options is in relation to where:

  • you are on the map/plan;
  • the already labelled things are.


Section 2

Exam information

  • You speak for between one and two minutes on the topic the examiner gives you.
  • You have one minute to think and write some notes before you speak.

Exam advice

Speaking Part 2

  • Structure your talk by using your notes and introducing your points clearly to the examiner.
  • To keep speaking for two minutes, you have to add extra information, so give reasons and examples, explain consequences and describe things.
  • Use your own words: don’t just repeat the words in the task.
  • Use appropriate phrases to mark the stages in your talk.


IELTS Describing a chart

  • During the exam, you should spend about 20 minutes on this task.
  • Write at least 150 words.

Exam advice

Chart summary

  • Study the chart(s) carefully and look for the most important features.
  • Write an introductory sentence which says what the chart(s) show(s).
  • Make sure the facts you write are correct.


You will be able to:

  • use the vocabulary on the topic «Animals»;
  • use countable and uncountable nouns correctly;
  • apply your skills of dealing with table completion, labelling a map or plan tasks in Listening Section 2 IELTS Exam;
  • apply your skills of dealing with sentence completion in Reading Section 1 IELTS Exam;
  • apply your speaking skills while answering questions in Speaking Section 2 IELTS Exam;
  • apply your skills of summarising two bar charts in Writing Section 1 IELTS Exam.

Listen and complete the notes below. Write one word for each gap

Welcome to the Fiddy Working Heritage Farm. This open-air museum gives you the experience of agriculture and rural life in the English countryside at the end of the nineteenth century. So you’ll see a typical farm of that period, and like me, all the staff are dressed in clothes of that time.

I must give you some advice and safety tips before we go any further. As it’s a working farm, please don’t frighten or injure the animals. We have a lot here, and many of them are breeds that are now quite rare.

And do stay at a safe distance from the tools: some of them have sharp points which can be pretty dangerous. So please don’t touch them. We don’t want any accidents, do we?

The ground is very uneven, and you might slip if you’re wearing sandals so I’m glad to see you’re all wearing shoes — we always advise people to do that.

Now, children of all ages are very welcome here, and usually even very young children love the ducks and lambs, so do bring them along next time you come.

I don’t think any of you have brought dogs with you. But in case you have, I’m afraid they’ll have to stay in the car park, unless they’re guide dogs. I’m sure you’ll understand that they could cause a lot of problems on a farm.

Now let me give you some idea of the layout of the farm. The building where you bought your tickets is the New Barn, immediately to your right, and we’re now at the beginning of the main path to the farmland — and of course the car park is on your left. The scarecrow you can see in the car park in the corner, beside the main path, is a traditional figure for keeping the birds away from crops, but our scarecrow is a permanent sculpture. It’s taller than a human being, so you can see it from quite a distance.

If you look ahead of you, you’ll see a maze. It’s opposite the New Barn, beside the side path that branches off to the right just over there. The maze is made out of hedges which are too tall for young children to see over them, but it’s quite small, so you can’t get lost in it!

Now, can you see the bridge crossing the fish pool further up the main path? If you want to go to the café, go towards the bridge and turn right just before it. Walk along the side path and the cafe’s on the first bend you come to. The building was originally the schoolhouse, and it’s well over a hundred years old.

As you may know, we run skills workshops here, where you can learn traditional crafts like woodwork and basket-making. You can see examples of the work, and talk to someone about the courses, in the Black Barn. If you take the side path to the right, here, just by the New Barn, you’ll come to the Black Barn just where the path first bends.

Now I mustn’t forget to tell you about picnicking, as I can see some of you have brought your lunch with you. You can picnic in the field, though do clear up behind you, of course. Or if you’d prefer a covered picnic area, there’s one near the farmyard: just after you cross the bridge, there’s a covered picnic spot on the right.

And the last thing to mention is Fiddy House itself. From here you can cross the bridge then walk along the footpath through the field to the left of the farmyard. That goes to the house, and it’ll give you a lovely view of it. It’s certainly worth a few photographs, but as it’s a private home, I’m afraid you can’t go inside.

Right. Well, if you’re all ready, we’ll set off on our tour of the farm.



Label the map below. Write the correct letter A-I, next to Questions 5-10

pic2_IELTS|Int|Revision 5

pic2_T|Grammar act|L10

Read the passage and decide if the statements below agree with the information given in Reading Passage

Great Migrations

Animal migration, however it is defined, is far more than just the movement of animals. It can loosely be described as travel that takes place at regular intervals — often in an annual cycle — that may involve many members of a species and is rewarded only after a long journey. It suggests inherited instinct. The biologist Hugh Dingle has identified five characteristics that apply, in varying degrees and combinations, to all migrations. They are prolonged movements that carry animals outside familiar habitats; they tend to be linear, not zigzaggy; they involve special behaviours concerning preparation (such as overfeeding) and arrival; they demand special allocations of energy. And one more: migrating animals maintain an intense attentiveness to the greater mission, which keeps them undistracted by temptations and undeterred by challenges that would turn other animals aside.

An arctic tern, on its 20,000 km flight from the extreme south of South America to the Arctic circle, will take no notice of a nice smelly herring offered from a bird-watcher’s boat along the way. While local gulls will dive voraciously for such handouts, the tern flies on. Why? The arctic tern resists distraction because it is driven at that moment by an instinctive sense of something we humans find admirable: larger purpose. In other words, it is determined to reach its destination. The bird senses that it can eat, rest and mate later. Right now it is totally focused on the journey; its undivided intent is arrival.

Reaching some gravelly coastline in the Arctic, upon which other arctic terns have converged, will serve its larger purpose as shaped by evolution: finding a place, a time, and a set of circumstances in which it can successfully hatch and rear offspring.

But migration is a complex issue, and biologists define it differently, depending in part on what sorts of animals they study. Joe Berger, of the University of Montana, who works on the American pronghorn and other large terrestrial mammals, prefers what he calls a simple, practical definition suited to his beasts: «movements from a seasonal home area away to another home area and back again». Generally, the reason for such seasonal back-and-forth movement is to seek resources that aren’t available within a single area year-round.

But daily vertical movements by zooplankton in the ocean — upward by night to seek food, downward by day to escape predators — can also be considered migration. So can the movement of aphids when, having depleted the young leaves on one food plant, their offspring then fly onward to a different host plant, with no one aphid ever returning to where it started.

Dingle is an evolutionary biologist who studies insects. His definition is more intricate than Berger’s, citing those five features that distinguish migration from other forms of movement. They allow for the fact that, for example, aphids will become sensitive to blue light (from the sky) when it’s time for takeoff on their big journey, and sensitive to yellow light (reflected from tender young leaves) when it’s appropriate to land. Birds will fatten themselves with heavy feeding in advance of a long migrational flight. The value of his definition, Dingle argues, is that it focuses attention on what the phenomenon of wildebeest migration shares with the phenomenon of the aphids, and therefore helps guide researchers towards understanding how evolution has produced them all.

Human behaviour, however, is having a detrimental impact on animal migration.

The pronghorn, which resembles an antelope, though they are unrelated, is the fastest land mammal of the New World. One population, which spends the summer in the mountainous Grand Teton National Park of the western USA, follows a narrow route from its summer range in the mountains, across a river, and down onto the plains. Here they wait out the frozen months, feeding mainly on sagebrush blown clear of snow. These pronghorn are notable for the invariance of their migration route and the severity of its constriction at three bottlenecks. If they can’t pass through each of the three during their spring migration, they can’t reach their bounty of summer grazing; if they can’t pass through again in autumn, escaping south onto those windblown plains, they are likely to die trying to overwinter in the deep snow. Pronghorn, dependent on distance vision and speed to keep safe from predators, traverse high, open shoulders of land, where they can see and run. At one of the bottlenecks, forested hills rise to form a V, leaving a corridor of open ground only about 150 metres wide, filled with private homes. Increasing development is leading toward a crisis for the pronghorn, threatening to choke off their passageway.

Conservation scientists, along with some biologists and land managers within the USA’s National Park Service and other agencies, are now working to preserve migrational behaviours, not just species and habitats. A National Forest has recognised the path of the pronghorn, much of which passes across its land, as a protected migration corridor. But neither the Forest Service nor the Park Service can control what happens on private land at a bottleneck. And with certain other migrating species, the challenge is complicated further — by vastly greater distances traversed, more jurisdictions, more borders, more dangers along the way. We will require wisdom and resoluteness to ensure that migrating species can continue their journeying a while longer.

Questions 1-5

  • True — if the statement agrees with the information
  • False — if the statement contradicts the information
  • Not given — if there is no information on this

Read the passage one more time and сomplete each sentence with the correct ending

Great Migrations

Animal migration, however it is defined, is far more than just the movement of animals. It can loosely be described as travel that takes place at regular intervals — often in an annual cycle — that may involve many members of a species and is rewarded only after a long journey. It suggests inherited instinct. The biologist Hugh Dingle has identified five characteristics that apply, in varying degrees and combinations, to all migrations. They are prolonged movements that carry animals outside familiar habitats; they tend to be linear, not zigzaggy; they involve special behaviours concerning preparation (such as overfeeding) and arrival; they demand special allocations of energy. And one more: migrating animals maintain an intense attentiveness to the greater mission, which keeps them undistracted by temptations and undeterred by challenges that would turn other animals aside.

An arctic tern, on its 20,000 km flight from the extreme south of South America to the Arctic circle, will take no notice of a nice smelly herring offered from a bird-watcher’s boat along the way. While local gulls will dive voraciously for such handouts, the tern flies on. Why? The arctic tern resists distraction because it is driven at that moment by an instinctive sense of something we humans find admirable: larger purpose. In other words, it is determined to reach its destination. The bird senses that it can eat, rest and mate later. Right now it is totally focused on the journey; its undivided intent is arrival.

Reaching some gravelly coastline in the Arctic, upon which other arctic terns have converged, will serve its larger purpose as shaped by evolution: finding a place, a time, and a set of circumstances in which it can successfully hatch and rear offspring.

But migration is a complex issue, and biologists define it differently, depending in part on what sorts of animals they study. Joe Berger, of the University of Montana, who works on the American pronghorn and other large terrestrial mammals, prefers what he calls a simple, practical definition suited to his beasts: «movements from a seasonal home area away to another home area and back again». Generally, the reason for such seasonal back-and-forth movement is to seek resources that aren’t available within a single area year-round.

But daily vertical movements by zooplankton in the ocean — upward by night to seek food, downward by day to escape predators — can also be considered migration. So can the movement of aphids when, having depleted the young leaves on one food plant, their offspring then fly onward to a different host plant, with no one aphid ever returning to where it started.

Dingle is an evolutionary biologist who studies insects. His definition is more intricate than Berger’s, citing those five features that distinguish migration from other forms of movement. They allow for the fact that, for example, aphids will become sensitive to blue light (from the sky) when it’s time for takeoff on their big journey, and sensitive to yellow light (reflected from tender young leaves) when it’s appropriate to land. Birds will fatten themselves with heavy feeding in advance of a long migrational flight. The value of his definition, Dingle argues, is that it focuses attention on what the phenomenon of wildebeest migration shares with the phenomenon of the aphids, and therefore helps guide researchers towards understanding how evolution has produced them all.

Human behaviour, however, is having a detrimental impact on animal migration.

The pronghorn, which resembles an antelope, though they are unrelated, is the fastest land mammal of the New World. One population, which spends the summer in the mountainous Grand Teton National Park of the western USA, follows a narrow route from its summer range in the mountains, across a river, and down onto the plains. Here they wait out the frozen months, feeding mainly on sagebrush blown clear of snow. These pronghorn are notable for the invariance of their migration route and the severity of its constriction at three bottlenecks. If they can’t pass through each of the three during their spring migration, they can’t reach their bounty of summer grazing; if they can’t pass through again in autumn, escaping south onto those windblown plains, they are likely to die trying to overwinter in the deep snow. Pronghorn, dependent on distance vision and speed to keep safe from predators, traverse high, open shoulders of land, where they can see and run. At one of the bottlenecks, forested hills rise to form a V, leaving a corridor of open ground only about 150 metres wide, filled with private homes. Increasing development is leading toward a crisis for the pronghorn, threatening to choke off their passageway.

Conservation scientists, along with some biologists and land managers within the USA’s National Park Service and other agencies, are now working to preserve migrational behaviours, not just species and habitats. A National Forest has recognised the path of the pronghorn, much of which passes across its land, as a protected migration corridor. But neither the Forest Service nor the Park Service can control what happens on private land at a bottleneck. And with certain other migrating species, the challenge is complicated further — by vastly greater distances traversed, more jurisdictions, more borders, more dangers along the way. We will require wisdom and resoluteness to ensure that migrating species can continue their journeying a while longer.



Complete the summary below. Choose one word only from the passage for each answer

Read the task and make notes on the topic «A wild animal you have seen»

listen and speak_Lesson

A wild animal you have seen

Describe a wild animal that you have seen that impressed you.

You should say:

  • what it looked like;
  • where you saw it;
  • what you were doing when you saw it;

and explain how you feel about this animal.


Speak on the topic for no longer than 2 minutes.

You have 3 attempts to answer this question.

Cover all of the points and provide a relevant answer.

Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|L17


Allow your browser access to your microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

pic4|Business|Pre-Int|L14

Read the exam task. Brainstorm ideas before writing

IELTS Writing Task 1

Exam card

Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

Write at least 150 words.


Instructions

  1. Read the Exam card carefully. If necessary, make use of the Exam advice.
  2. Plan what you are going to write about.
  3. Write the essay according to your plan.
  4. Check your writing.
  5. Please use 🔗Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.

Wordlist

Wordlist1_IELTS|Int|Revision 5

Useful language

  • To understand the role of …
  • Firstly, … and the links of this idea with/to …
  • Next, it closely examines … in relation to …
  • Finally, it focuses on … and how this affects …
  • One aspect which illustrates … can be identified as …
  • The current debate about … identifies an interesting viewpoint on …
  • This first/next/final section … provides a general discussion of …
  • Building on from the idea that … , this section illustrates that … .
  • To further understand the role of, … this section explores the idea that …
  • Another line of thought on … demonstrates that …
  • However, another angle on this debate suggests that …
  • In contrast to evidence which presents the view that … , an alternative perspective illustrates that …
  • However, not all research shows that … . Some evidence agrees that …
  • This evidence highlights that …
  • There is general agreement that …
  • The strength of such an approach is that …
  • Clearly, … has shown that the main factors which impact upon … are …
  • The evidence has shown that …
  • To conclude, …

Species used for animal testing

If you open the lesson plan you will be able to assign separate pages as homework or all the homework pages at once.

  • Revise the vocabulary
  • Revise the grammar
  • My achievements
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Reading 2
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Homework
  • Homework
  1. 1. IELTS|Intermediate|1. Dream city
  2. 2. IELTS|Intermediate|2. Booking an apartment
  3. 3. IELTS|Intermediate|3. Talking about your hometown
  4. 4. IELTS|Intermediate|4. Where to go?
  5. 5. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 1
  6. 6. IELTS|Intermediate|5. Explorer and writer
  7. 7. IELTS|Intermediate|6. Travelling companions
  8. 8. IELTS|Intermediate|7. Family and childhood
  9. 9. IELTS|Intermediate|8. Families around the world
  10. 10. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 2
  11. 11. IELTS|Intermediate|9. Machines in our life
  12. 12. IELTS|Intermediate|10. On board
  13. 13. IELTS|Intermediate|11. Travelling around
  14. 14. IELTS|Intermediate|12. Different ways
  15. 15. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 3
  16. 16. IELTS|Intermediate| 13. Old innovation
  17. 17. IELTS|Intermediate|14. At an exhibition
  18. 18. IELTS|Intermediate|15. Electronic devices
  19. 19. IELTS|Intermediate|16. Inventions
  20. 20. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 4
  21. 21. IELTS|Intermediate|17. Wild animals
  22. 22. IELTS|Intermediate|18. In the zoo
  23. 23. IELTS|Intermediate|19. Animals in our life
  24. 24. IELTS|Intermediate|20. Animal life
  25. 25. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 5
  26. 26. IELTS|Intermediate|21. It makes difference
  27. 27. IELTS|Intermediate|22. Successful people
  28. 28. IELTS|Intermediate|23. Human memory
  29. 29. IELTS|Intermediate|24. Talent and success
  30. 30. IELTS|Intermediate|Revise and Check 6
  31. 31. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: reading and speaking
  32. 32. IELTS|Intermediate|Exam: listening and writing