IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|25. Environmental issues

Match subheadings A-E and the possible topics of the corresponding articles

Read the text and fill in the gaps with appropriate words. There are two extra words you do not need

pic1_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25


Discuss the questions on nature photography

1. How does photographing nature differ from photographing people?

2. What makes a good nature photograph?

3. Have you ever tried photographing animals? How easy or difficult was it?

4. How can conservation photography help the environment?

Look at the map and answer the questions

1. What does the map show?

2. How many woodland areas are there? Where are they, and how do they compare in size?

3. What shape are the lochs? Explain in your own words where they are on the map.

4. How many rivers are there ? Where are they?

5. Where is each letter on the map situated?

Look at Questions 4-5 and underline the key words. Think of possible answers for these questions

pic2_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25

Exam tips

Labelling a plan

1. Look at the location of each option on the map and think about how each one might be described.

2. The answers will come in the same order as the questions.

3. Listen for the things named in each question and follow the speaker’s directions to locate them.

Short-answer questions

1. Underline the key ideas in the question in order to focus your listening.

2. Keep within the word limit.

3. Check that you have spelled your answers correctly and not included unnecessary words.

pic3_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25

Listen to the recording and do the tasks for questions 1-3 and questions 4-5

Narrator Tutor Brett Mica

Narrator: You will hear two students talking to their tutor about a photography assignment.
Tutor: So, you’re off to Glen Affric next week in the Highlands of Scotland for your photography assignment.
Brett: Yes, that’s right.
Tutor: So have you got the map I gave you of Loch Affric and the surrounding area?
Brett: Yup — here’s mine.
Mica: And mine. Loch means «lake», right?
Tutor: Yes, that’s right. Now, you’ve read up on it, so is there anything in particular that you want to look out for?
Brett: Well, as I said, I’d love to get some really good shots of the pine trees, particularly old ones.
Mica: You’re going to see them all over. Look, there’s a particularly big area of forest to the south-east here and several smaller ones.
Tutor: Yes, they’re OK, but if you look at where the two lochs meet…
Brett: Um, where it narrows in the centre of the map?
Tutor: That’s right. You’ll find some of the oldest pines there — up to 200 years old.
Brett: Great — I’ll mark that.
Mica: What about red deer? Can we hope to see any?
Brett: I guess they’d be more out in the open, in the non-wooded areas.
Tutor: Well, they like an area near the edge of woodland.
Mica: So perhaps this largest area of forest — here, in the corner of the map?
Tutor: Yes — they also need water, so between the woodland and the river — I’d try that spot. What you should also look for are red squirrels.
Brett: But they’re so rare in Britain!
Mica: Not here, though. You might get a good picture of one among the pine trees near the loch.
Brett: Mm, close to the loch… um, perhaps this south side of Loch Affric.
Tutor: Mmm. Not right on the edge, though — that’s where you’d look for birds — but in this slightly bigger patch of woodland behind it.
Brett: Just away from the water a bit, then.
Tutor: Yup. There’s plenty of wildlife to tempt you. But remember to go for a good shot when you see it.
Brett: Yes, I remember what you said in your lecture — if you’re in a good spot, the light is good; if an animal is about to move into a great position, then be ready and go for it. My problem’s hesitation — I wait too long!
Mica: You lose the moment.
Tutor: Well, a lot of inexperienced photographers have that particular problem.
Mica: What if you frighten your subject off?
Tutor: If you do, it’s like anything, you have to put it down to experience.
Brett: So you shouldn’t wait too long, but don’t take the shot too soon either — sometimes you’ve got to have patience.
Tutor: That’s one of the most important qualities if you’re a wildlife photographer. You may have to sit for hours waiting for the perfect moment. But suddenly something will take your breath away and you’ll realise it’s all been worth it!


Questions 1-3

Label the plan below.

Choose the correct letter, A-F, next to questions 1-3.

[h 5 p id=»10484″]


Read questions 6-10. Underline the key ideas and identify the type of information which is needed to complete each gap

pic4_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25

pic5_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25

Listen to the recording and do the task in the green box

Tutor Brett Mica

Tutor: Right, so do you have any further questions about the trip?
Brett: Well, yeah — I was wondering about the weather — they’re forecasting a lot of mist.
Tutor: Well, yes, but I wouldn’t worry — in the long run, you’ll still get your pictures.
Brett: But…
Tutor: You just have to be careful. You know, experts say there’s no such thing as bad weather when it comes to photography.
Mica: What about driving rain?
Tutor: Well, yes, that doesn’t make things easy, but it does mean that you need to take the landscape into account. Perhaps to a greater degree than you would normally.
Mica: Is that because of shadow and things like that?
Tutor: Well, you get shadow in good weather.
Mica: Yeah — I guess so.
Brett: Um, I’m really looking forward to photographing the Scots pine trees. I want to make the most of all the stunning reflections in the water.
Tutor: Just take your time, and you might capture an amazing reflection — you really should profit from this with the water around you.
Mica: You were talking last week in your lecture about a piece of equipment called an angle finder, and I’ve been checking them out on the Internet…
Tutor: Ah-hah. it’s a clever little device — particularly useful if you’re down on your knees trying to get really close to something in the grass, like an insect or bird.
Brett: I’ve got one actually — and what’s great about it is that it prevents neck pain, because it’s like a periscope on a submarine — you can lie down and look through it without hurting your neck.
Mica: Definitely worth buying, then!
Tutor: Now, is there anything else?
Brett: Well, I’ve been looking at some wildlife paintings by Scottish artists. I thought they might help me get ideas.
Mica: That’s a good suggestion.
Tutor: Some designers can be helpful, too… they can help give you ideas about camera angles and how you use natural light.
Mica: Hmm, I’ll look into that. One other thing … I know you said we should consider matters related to conservation when we choose a scene to photograph.
Tutor: I made that point because, well, images like the ones you’re going to take can sometimes reveal some of the conservation problems faced by species and habitats. It’s just something to bear in mind.



Exam tips

Sentence completion

1. The recording will use paraphrases or synonyms of the words in the questions, so you should focus carefully on the meaning of what the speakers are saying rather than listening for identical words.

2. You will hear the exact word(s) you need to complete the sentences.

3. Read the completed sentences to check they make sense and reflect what you have understood.

Read the task in the green box and make brief notes

pic6_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25

Describe the best place to take photos where you live.

You should say:

  • where it is;
  • what people can take photos of there;
  • how they can get there;
  • why you particularly like it.

Useful language

  • to bear in mind
  • in the long run
  • to make the most of
  • to put down to experience
  • to take time
  • to take one’s breath away
  • to take into account

Speak on the topic for about 2 minutes

Complete these expressions from the Listening section using the words from the box

We like to put new people in the picture as soon as they arrive.

Tutor Brett Mica

T: Right, so do you have any further questions about the trip?

B: Well, yeah – I was wondering about the weather – they’re forecasting a lot of mist.

T: Well, yes. But I wouldn’t worry – in the long run you’ll still get your pictures.

B: But…

T: You just have to be careful. You know, experts say there’s no such thing as bad weather when it comes to photography.

M: What about driving rain?

T: Well, yes, that doesn’t make things easy, but it does mean that you need to take the landscape into account. Perhaps to a greater degree than you would normally.

M: Is that because of shadow and things like that?

T: Well, you get shadow in good weather.

M: Yeah – I guess so.

B: Um, I’m really looking forward to photographing the Scots pine trees. I want to make the most of all the stunning reflections in the water.

T: Just take your time, and you might capture an amazing reflection – you really should profit from this with the water around you.

M: You were talking last week in your lecture about a piece of equipment called an angle finder, and I’ve been checking them out on the Internet …

T: Ah-hah, it’s a clever little device – particularly useful if you’re down on your knees trying to get really close to something in the grass, like an insect or bird.

B: I’ve got one actually – and what’s great about it is that it prevents neck pain, because it’s like a periscope on a submarine – you can lie down and look through it without hurting your neck.

M: Definitely worth buying, then!

Match the expressions from the previous task and their meanings

pic7_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25

Complete the passage with the words and phrases from the box to make idiomatic expressions

Listen to the first part and answer questions 1-5

Student Teacher

Student: Morning, Professor Blake. Can I have a word?
Teacher: Good morning, Ewan. Come in and take a seat. What can I do for you?
Student: Well, at the weekend. I’m going to be doing a survey on birds in the Wychwood nature reserve…
Teacher: As part of your project on endangered British species, right?
Student: Right. The thing is. I’ve never done this before, and as you’re a keen birdwatcher. I was wondering if you had any useful tips.
Teacher: OK, sure. Well, the first thing you should do is get yourself a good pair of binoculars. They should be as light as possible so they’re not uncomfortable around your neck, and their optical quality should be very good. You don’t want to come back from your trip with eye and neck strain, after all.
Student: Definitely not!
Teacher: Now, the most important thing to do is to practise good fieldcraft.
Student: Fieldcraft?
Teacher: Right. You need to think like a hunter and stalk the birds carefully. Be slow and patient and avoid sudden movement. Don’t wear bright clothing, or clothing that rustles. And try to avoid talking or even whispering loudly, as this is guaranteed to scare the birds off. If at all possible, you should also try to camouflage yourself against the background, and keep below the skyline, to avoid being seen by the birds.
Student: What about identifying the birds?
Teacher: Well, some people take a guide book with them, but they then spend the whole time with their nose buried in it rather than watching the birds. My advice is to leave the actual identification of the bird until last.
Student: OK, so what should I do?
Teacher: Well, once you’ve spotted a bird, start by listening to its call or song. This is one of the best bird identification tools there is. You then need to use visual clues, so start with an assessment of the bird’s overall appearance. What is the approximate size of the bird? It’s easiest to estimate the size in relation to birds you already recognise.
Student: So, for example, it’s bigger than a blackbird but smaller than a pigeon.
Teacher: That’s the idea. You also need to look for facial markings and bill characteristics. And also look out for other distinctive markings, especially on its wings.
Student: Not particularly easy, I guess, if the bird is flying around a lot.
Teacher: That’s true, but the way a bird moves can also help you to identify it, er, how it walks, for example, or how it moves from branch to branch in a tree. And how does it fly? Are there any patterns there?
Student: Like, does it glide gently and steadily with each wing beat, or does it swoop up and down in gentle arcs?
Teacher: Exactly. Then try to determine its feeding habits. Not only what the bird is eating, but also how it feeds. And don’t forget its preferred habitat is important too. Each species of bird has a typical region that they inhabit. Anyway, when you’ve finished observing one bird, but before moving on to another, make notes about your observations. You could even make rough sketches of the birds you see. And finally, at the end of the day, when you’re back home…
Student: Look up the birds in my guide book.
Teacher: Right!


Questions 1-5

Complete the sentences.

Write no more than two words for each answer.

Listen to the rest of the conversation and answer questions 6-10

Teacher Student

Teacher: Now, one of the good things about the Wychwood reserve is that it has several hides where you can observe the wildlife. Have you got a map of the reserve?
Student: I have.
Teacher: Great. I can show you where the best ones are. OK, so, you’ve got the entrance to the reserve, here in the south, and there’s the sea to the north. Now, there are several hides, and each one is named after a different bird.
Student: OK.
Teacher: The best ones are Goose hide, Eagle hide and Cuckoo hide. So, let’s start with Goose hide. This is the best place for spotting water birds, er, freshwater birds, that is. On your map, can you see a lake on the right, beyond the woods by the entrance?
Student: I’ve got it.
Teacher: There are two hides there, and Goose hide is the one on the far side. It’s better than the other one by the lake because it’s hard up against the hill behind it, which helps to camouflage it slightly. No skyline, you see. And you can get to it by taking one of the paths around the lake. The one running anti-clockwise is shorter but it’s a bit marshy, so you might want to go the longer way, which takes you around the north side of the lake.
Student: Right.
Teacher: To get to Eagle hide, which will give you the best opportunity to see birds that frequent hills and mountains, follow the same path from the entrance and around the north side of the lake, but turn left where the path forks, shortly before the bridge over the stream. Then head towards the sea. You’ll find Eagle hide where two paths meet. You’ll get some great views of the hills on either side.
Student: Great. What about woodland birds?
Teacher: You’ve got a few options here, but like I said. Cuckoo hide is the best one. See the wood in the west of the reserve? The larger of the two on that side?
Student: Uh-huh.
Teacher: That’s where you’ll find Cuckoo hide. It’s on a raised platform, so you’re right up in the trees with the birds.
Student: That sounds great.
Teacher: Right, well, good luck. I look forward to hearing how you get on. Are you going on your own?
Student: No, I’ve managed to persuade a friend to come along with me.
Teacher: That’s good. It’s much more fun when you’ve got company. And of course two pairs of eyes are better than one. Also, check the weather forecast before you go, because it won’t be a very enjoyable experience if you find yourself walking around the reserve in the pouring rain. Oh, and don’t forget there aren’t any restaurants or cafés in the reserve, so it might be a good idea to pack something to eat in your bag alongside your binoculars. Go for something you can prepare before you go. Sandwiches, or something like that.
Student: Well, thanks for the advice. I’m really looking forward to it.


Questions 6-8

Label the plan below.

Write the correct letter, A-G, next to questions 6-8.


pic10_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25

Read the text and choose the correct options for questions 1-5

Bring back the big cats

It’s time to start returning vanished native animals to Britain, says John Vesty There is a poem, written around 598 AD, which describes hunting a mystery animal called a llewyn. But what was it? Nothing seemed to fit, until 2006, when an animal bone, dating from around the same period, was found in the Kinsey Cave in northern England. Until this discovery, the lynx – a large spotted cat with tasseled ears – was presumed to have died out in Britain at least 6,000 years ago, before the inhabitants of these islands took up farming. But the 2006 find, together with three others in Yorkshire and Scotland, is compelling evidence that the lynx and the mysterious llewyn were in fact one and the same animal. If this is so, it would bring forward the tassel-eared cat’s estimated extinction date by roughly 5,000 years.

However, this is not quite the last glimpse of the animal in British culture. A 9th- century stone cross from the Isle of Eigg shows, alongside the deer, boar and aurochs pursued by a mounted hunter, a speckled cat with tasseled ears. Were it not for the animal’s backside having worn away with time, we could have been certain, as the lynx’s stubby tail is unmistakable. But even without this key feature, it’s hard to see what else the creature could have been. The lynx is now becoming the totemic animal of a movement that is transforming British environmentalism: rewilding.

Rewilding means the mass restoration of damaged ecosystems. It involves letting trees return to places that have been denuded, allowing parts of the seabed to recover from trawling and dredging, permitting rivers to flow freely again. Above all, it means bringing back missing species. One of the most striking findings of modern ecology is that ecosystems without large predators behave in completely different ways from those that retain them. Some of them drive dynamic processes that resonate through the whole food chain, creating niches for hundreds of species that might otherwise struggle to survive. The killers turn out to be bringers of life.

Such findings present a big challenge to British conservation, which has often selected arbitrary assemblages of plants and animals and sought, at great effort and expense, to prevent them from changing. It has tried to preserve the living world as if it were a jar of pickles, letting nothing in and nothing out, keeping nature in a state of arrested development. But ecosystems are not merely collections of species; they are also the dynamic and ever-shifting relationships between them. And this dynamism often depends on large predators.

At sea the potential is even greater. By protecting large areas from commercial fishing, we could once more see what 18th-century literature describes: vast shoals of fish being chased by fin and sperm whales, within sight of the English shore. This policy would also greatly boost catches in the surrounding seas; the fishing industry’s insistence on scouring every inch of seabed, leaving no breeding reserves, could not be more damaging to its own interests.

Rewilding is a rare example of an environmental movement in which campaigners articulate what they are for rather than only what they are against. One of the reasons why the enthusiasm for rewilding is spreading so quickly in Britain is that it helps to create a more inspiring vision than the green movement’s usual promise of «Follow us and the world will be slightly less awful than it would otherwise have been.»

The lynx presents no threat to human beings: there is no known instance of one preying on people. It is a specialist predator of roe deer, a species that has exploded in Britain in recent decades, holding back, by intensive browsing, attempts to re-establish forests. It will also winkle out sika deer, an exotic species that is almost impossible for human beings to control, as it hides in impenetrable plantations of young trees. The attempt to reintroduce this predator marries well with the aim of bringing forests back to parts of our bare and barren uplands. The lynx requires deep cover, and as such presents little risk to sheep and other livestock, which are supposed, as a condition of farm subsidies, to be kept out of the woods.

On a recent trip to the Cairngorm Mountains, I heard several conservationists suggest that the lynx could be reintroduced there within 20 years. If trees return to the bare hills elsewhere in Britain, the big cats could soon follow. There is nothing extraordinary about these proposals, seen from the perspective of anywhere else in Europe. The lynx has now been reintroduced to the Jura Mountains, the Alps, the Vosges in eastern France and the Harz mountains in Germany, and has re-established itself in many more places. The European population has tripled since 1970 to roughly 10,000. As with wolves, bears, beavers, boar, bison, moose and many other species, the lynx has been able to spread as farming has, left the hills and people discover that it is more lucrative to protect charismatic wildlife than to hunt it, as tourists will pay for the chance to see it. Large-scale rewilding is happening almost everywhere, except Britain.

Here, attitudes are just beginning to change. Conservationists are starting to accept that the old preservation-jar model is failing, even on its own terms. Already, projects such as Trees for Life in the Highlands provide a hint of what might be coming. An organisation is being set up that will seek to catalyse the rewilding of land and sea across Britain, its aim being to reintroduce that rarest of species to British ecosystems – hope.

pic11_IELTS|Upper-Int|L25

Read the task in the green box and complete questions 6-9

Questions 6-9

Do the following statements agree with the claims of the writer in the reading passage?

Choose:

Yes — if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer

No — if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer

Not Given — if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this


Bring back the big cats

It’s time to start returning vanished native animals to Britain, says John Vesty There is a poem, written around 598 AD, which describes hunting a mystery animal called a llewyn. But what was it? Nothing seemed to fit, until 2006, when an animal bone, dating from around the same period, was found in the Kinsey Cave in northern England. Until this discovery, the lynx – a large spotted cat with tassel led ears – was presumed to have died out in Britain at least 6,000 years ago, before the inhabitants of these islands took up farming. But the 2006 find, together with three others in Yorkshire and Scotland, is compelling evidence that the lynx and the mysterious llewyn were in fact one and the same animal. If this is so, it would bring forward the tassel-eared cat’s estimated extinction date by roughly 5,000 years.

However, this is not quite the last glimpse of the animal in British culture. A 9th- century stone cross from the Isle of Eigg shows, alongside the deer, boar and aurochs pursued by a mounted hunter, a speckled cat with tasselled ears. Were it not for the animal’s backside having worn away with time, we could have been certain, as the lynx’s stubby tail is unmistakable. But even without this key feature, it’s hard to see what else the creature could have been. The lynx is now becoming the totemic animal of a movement that is transforming British environmentalism: rewilding.

Rewilding means the mass restoration of damaged ecosystems. It involves letting trees return to places that have been denuded, allowing parts of the seabed to recover from trawling and dredging, permitting rivers to flow freely again. Above all, it means bringing back missing species. One of the most striking findings of modern ecology is that ecosystems without large predators behave in completely different ways from those that retain them. Some of them drive dynamic processes that resonate through the whole food chain, creating niches for hundreds of species that might otherwise struggle to survive. The killers turn out to be bringers of life.

Such findings present a big challenge to British conservation, which has often selected arbitrary assemblages of plants and animals and sought, at great effort and expense, to prevent them from changing. It has tried to preserve the living world as if it were a jar of pickles, letting nothing in and nothing out, keeping nature in a state of arrested development. But ecosystems are not merely collections of species; they are also the dynamic and ever-shifting relationships between them. And this dynamism often depends on large predators.

At sea the potential is even greater. By protecting large areas from commercial fishing, we could once more see what 18th-century literature describes: vast shoals of fish being chased by fin and sperm whales, within sight of the English shore. This policy would also greatly boost catches in the surrounding seas; the fishing industry’s insistence on scouring every inch of seabed, leaving no breeding reserves, could not be more damaging to its own interests.

Rewilding is a rare example of an environmental movement in which campaigners articulate what they are for rather than only what they are against. One of the reasons why the enthusiasm for rewilding is spreading so quickly in Britain is that it helps to create a more inspiring vision than the green movement’s usual promise of «Follow us and the world will be slightly less awful than it would otherwise have been.»

The lynx presents no threat to human beings: there is no known instance of one preying on people. It is a specialist predator of roe deer, a species that has exploded in Britain in recent decades, holding back, by intensive browsing, attempts to re-establish forests. It will also winkle out sika deer, an exotic species that is almost impossible for human beings to control, as it hides in impenetrable plantations of young trees. The attempt to reintroduce this predator marries well with the aim of bringing forests back to parts of our bare and barren uplands. The lynx requires deep cover, and as such presents little risk to sheep and other livestock, which are supposed, as a condition of farm subsidies, to be kept out of the woods.

On a recent trip to the Cairngorm Mountains, I heard several conservationists suggest that the lynx could be reintroduced there within 20 years. If trees return to the bare hills elsewhere in Britain, the big cats could soon follow. There is nothing extraordinary about these proposals, seen from the perspective of anywhere else in Europe. The lynx has now been reintroduced to the Jura Mountains, the Alps, the Vosges in eastern France and the Harz mountains in Germany, and has re-established itself in many more places. The European population has tripled since 1970 to roughly 10,000. As with wolves, bears, beavers, boar, bison, moose and many other species, the lynx has been able to spread as farming has, left the hills and people discover that it is more lucrative to protect charismatic wildlife than to hunt it, as tourists will pay for the chance to see it. Large-scale rewilding is happening almost everywhere, except Britain.

Here, attitudes are just beginning to change. Conservationists are starting to accept that the old preservation-jar model is failing, even on its own terms. Already, projects such as Trees for Life in the Highlands provide a hint of what might be coming. An organisation is being set up that will seek to catalyse the rewilding of land and sea across Britain, its aim being to reintroduce that rarest of species to British ecosystems – hope.

  • Warm-up
  • Photos to save?
  • Looking for rare species
  • Searching the right place
  • Instructions for photographer
  • Photo is a must!
  • Speaking brightly
  • Bird-watching
  • Bird's beauty
  • Safe nests
  • Reintroduction of species - 1
  • Reintroduction of species - 2
  • Bird-watching
  • Bird\'s beauty
  • Safe nests
  • Reintroduction of species - 1
  • Reintroduction of species - 2
  1. 1. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|1. Being a high achiever
  2. 2. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|2. University life
  3. 3. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|3. Getting a qualification
  4. 4. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|4. Career plans
  5. 5. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 1
  6. 6. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|5. Perceiving colours
  7. 7. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|6. The art of colour
  8. 8. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|7. The best colour
  9. 9. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|8. Adding colour
  10. 10. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 2
  11. 11. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|9. In therapy
  12. 12. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|10. Placebo effect
  13. 13. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|11. Changing life expectancy
  14. 14. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|12. Leading a healthy life
  15. 15. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 3
  16. 16. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|13. Works of art
  17. 17. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|14. Aboriginal art
  18. 18. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|15. Being good at arts
  19. 19. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|16. What is a masterpiece?
  20. 20. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 4
  21. 21. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|17. Collecting fossils
  22. 22. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|18. Evolution and survival
  23. 23. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|19. The Earth's interior
  24. 24. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|20. A valuable possession
  25. 25. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 5
  26. 26. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|21. The role of technology
  27. 27. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|22. Film making and technology
  28. 28. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|23. The impact of IT on society
  29. 29. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|24. Number one website
  30. 30. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 6
  31. 31. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|25. Environmental issues
  32. 32. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|26. Wildlife wonders
  33. 33. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|27. Endangered species
  34. 34. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|28. A symbol of a nation
  35. 35. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 7
  36. 36. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|29. Exploring space
  37. 37. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|30. Observing the stars
  38. 38. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|31. Space tourism prospects
  39. 39. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|32. Extraterrestrial phenomena
  40. 40. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 8
  41. 41. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Exam Part 1
  42. 42. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Exam Part 2