IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 3

pic2_T|Grammar act|L10

Before the lesson, think about these questions and revise the vocabulary

What are you doing to stay healthy?

Wordlist

1. allergy
2. bruise
3. condition
4. cure
5. injury
6. joint
7. limb
8. monitor
9. prescribe
10. rash
11. sprain
12. stiffness


Has the healthcare system in your country changed recently? In what way?

Wordlist

1. amount
2. aspect
3. breakdown
4. incidence
5. indicate
6. highlight
7. level
8. number
9. proportion
10. quality
11. rate
12. type


What are your short and long term goals?

Wordlist

1. aspiration
2. be likely to
3. challenge
4. dream of
5. expect
6. force
7. intend
8. look ahead
9. look forward to
10. tackle


Have you ever done a research in any sphere? What was it like?

Useful language

  • to promote feelings
  • to gauge the effectiveness
  • to overlook a factor
  • to challenge an assumption
  • to determine an outcome
  • to yield results
  • to devise a strategy
  • to outline the causes


What steps should the government take for citizens to be healthier?

Wordlist

1. course
2. inoculate
3. rehabilitation
4. sedentary
5. sustained
6. therapeutic
7. triathlon

Grammar

Read the grammar rules

Differences

Expressing large and small differences

1. We can say there is a large difference between one thing and another with the following patterns:

much/far/a lot/considerably + adjective/adverb + -er more + adjective/adverb:

e.g. Scientists have found that eating fish is far healthier than eating red meat.

not nearly as + adjective/adverb + as:

e.g. The British do not eat nearly as much fish as the Spanish.

Expressing small differences

1. We can express small differences between one thing and another using these patterns:

slightly/a bit/a little + adjective/adverb + -er/more + adjective/adverb:

e.g. Slightly lower speed limits have led to considerable reductions in traffic accidents.

not quite as + adjective/adverb + as:

e.g. The graph shows that consumption of chocolate was not quite as high in 2012 as in 1992.

nearly/almost as + adjective/adverb + as:

e.g. Coffee drinking was nearly as popular in 2011 as in 2010.

Quantifying differences

We can quantify differences exactly using these patterns:

a quarter, one-and-a-half times, twice, three times, 30%, etc. + as much/many as:

e.g. A house in London may cost twice as much as a house in the north of England.

three times, four times, 50%, etc. + more/greater, etc. than:

e.g. Fuel prices in Western Europe are on average 40% higher than in North America.

a quarter, one-and-a-half times, double, three times, etc. + the number/amount + of + as:

e.g. The British import three times the amount of sugar as the Portuguese.

We can say that things have no similarity by saying:

X is completely/very/totally/entirely/quite different from/to Y:

e.g. The Chinese medical system is completely different from the American one.

X and Y are not the same at all / X and Y bear no similarity to each other.

e.g. The Chinese and American medical systems bear no similarity to each other.

Revise the exam format

pic2_Business|Adv|L11

Exam information
Reading 60 min,
no transfer time
Three reading passages in increasing order of difficulty

40 questions (1 mark each)

different types of questions

Part 1 – Narrative/descriptive passage 20 minutes

Part 2 – Descriptive/discursive passage 20 minutes

Part 3 – Argumentative/discursive passage 20 minutes

Reading Section 3 is generally more challenging than the other two sections. The reading passage is usually discursive and may contain detailed logical argument. Texts may also have non-verbal materials such as diagrams, graphs or illustrations. If texts contain technical terms, a simple glossary is provided.

6.5-7.5 band score

(advanced level) requires 26-34 marks

🔗More information

Exam tips

Yes / No / Not Given

  • Use the same approach for True / False / Not Given and Yes / No / Not Given questions.
  • Mind that True / False / Not Given questions refer to information stated in the article, whereas Y / N / NG questions refer to the writer’s opinions or claims.
  • Remember that «No» statements say the opposite of what is stated in the passage, while the idea in «Not given» statements is not mentioned at all.

Exam tips

Summary completion with a box

1. Mind that the answers may come from more than one part of the passage.

2. Use the title and words in the summary to help you find the right parts.

3. Connect the words in the passage that provide the missing information – you need to match these to the correct option in the box.


Exam tips

Multiple choice

  • Use names and other words while scannig to find the right place in the passage.
  • Read above and below that part of the passage and underline the words that answer the questions.


Exam information
Listening 30 min
+
10 min transfer time
4 recordings in increasing order of difficulty

40 questions (1 mark each)

recordings are heard only once

Section 1 – a conversation set in an everyday context.

Section 2 – a monologue

In Section 2, you hear one speaker talking about a social or general topic. This part of the test is slightly harder than Section 1.

Section 3 – a conversation set in educational and training contexts. It can be a conversation between two main speakers (for example, two university students in discussion, perhaps guided by a tutor)

Section 4 – a monologue

6.5-7.5 band score

(advanced level) requires 26-34 marks

🔗More information

Exam advice

Matching

  1. Underline the key ideas in the questions and / or options.
  2. Be aware that you will hear the questions in the same order as they are written on the question paper.
  3. Write your answers as you listen.

Exam tips

Flow chart completion

  1. Use the title and the words around the gaps to decide what you need to listen for.
  2. Quickly read through the chart afterwards to check your answers make sense.


Exam information
Writing 60 min. 2 tasks (a summary and an essay)

both must be completed

Task 1 – Summary 150 words, 20 minutes
Candidates are asked to describe some visual information (graph/table/chart/diagram) in their own words. Answers must be given on the answer sheet in full. It should be written in an academic or semi-formal/neutral styles and include the most relevant points

Task 2 – Essay 250 words, 40 minutes
Candidates are given a topic to write about using an academic or semi-formal/neutral style. The task may contain more than one point to address. Answers should be a discursive consideration of the relevant issues. Test takers should make sure that they read the task carefully and provide a full and relevant response.

Task 1 assesses the ability to identify the most important and relevant information and trends in the visuals and to give a well-organised overview.

Task 2 assesses the ability to present a clear, relevant, well-organised argument, giving evidence or examples to support ideas and use language accurately.

🔗More information

Exam tips

Writing Task 1

  1. If there is more than one chart, decide how they relate to each other.
  2. Ensure key features are clearly expressed.
  3. Include an overview, summarising the main trends or features.
  4. Vary your vocabulary and use your own words as far as possible (e.g. do not lift long phrases from the task instructions).


Exam information
Speaking 11-14 min. 3 parts

oral interview: an examiner + a candidate

speaking test is recorded

Part 1 – Introduction and interview 4-5 minutes

Part 2 – Long turn 3-4 minutes including the preparation time

Part 2 is the individual long turn. The examiner gives the test takers a task card which asks the test takers to talk about a particular topic, includes points to cover in their talk and instructs the test takers to explain one aspect of the topic. Test takers are given one minute to prepare their talk. The examiner asks the test takers to talk for 1 to 2 minutes, stops the test takers after 2 minutes, and asks one or two questions on the same topic.

Part 3 – Discussion 4-5 minutes

Making notes during the preparation time helps the test takers think of appropriate things to say, structure their talk, and keep talking for 2 minutes.

🔗More information

Exam tips

Speaking Part 2

1. Use your notes and the task to give your talk a clear structure.

2. Use linking and pausing to give your speech a natural-sounding rhythm.

3. Be prepared to answer one or two questions on your talk when you have finished. (You only need to give very brief answers.)


You will be able to:

  • check your skills of dealing with flow chart completion and matching tasks in Listening Section 3 IELTS Exam;
  • check your skills of dealing with multiple choice, summary completion from the box and Y/N/NG tasks in Reading Part 3 IELTS Exam;
  • check your skills of writing a summary in Writing Task 1 IELTS Exam;
  • check your speaking skills while talking about a future ambition and healthy lifestyle in Speaking Part 2 IELTS Exam;
  • revise the comparative phrases;
  • revise vocabulary on the topics «Staying healthy», «Quantity and amount», «Future hopes», «Doing a research», «Healthy lifestyle».

pic1_IELTS|Upper-Int|Revision 3

Read the passage and do the tasks below

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 28-40, which are based on Reading Passage 3 below.

The art of healing

As with so much, the medicine of the Tang dynasty left its European counterpart in the shade. It boasted its own ‘national health service’, and left behind the teachings of the incomparable Sun Simiao.

If no further evidence was available of the sophistication of China in the Tang era, then a look at Chinese medicine would be sufficient. At the Western end of the Eurasian continent the Roman empire had vanished, and there was nowhere new to claim the status of the cultural and political centre of the world. In fact, for a few centuries, this centre happened to be the capital of the Tang empire, and Chinese medicine under the Tang was far ahead of its European counterpart. The organisational context of health and healing was structured to a degree that had no precedence in Chinese history and found no parallel elsewhere.

An Imperial Medical Office had been inherited from previous dynasties: it was immediately restructured and staffed with directors and deputy directors, chief and assistant medical directors, pharmacists and curators of medicinal herb gardens and further personnel. Within the first two decades after consolidating its rule, the Tang administration set up one central and several provincial medical colleges with professors, lecturers, clinical practitioners and pharmacists to train students in one or all of the four departments of medicine, acupuncture, physical therapy and exorcism.

Physicians were given positions in governmental medical service only after passing qualifying examinations. They were remunerated in accordance with the number of cures they had effected during the past year.

In 723, Emperor Xuanzong personally composed a general formulary of prescriptions recommended to him by one of his imperial pharmacists and sent it to all the provincial medical schools. An Arabic traveller, who visited China in 851, noted with surprise that prescriptions from the emperor’s formulary were publicised on notice boards at crossroads to enhance the welfare of the population.

The government took care to protect the general populace from potentially harmful medical practice. The Tang legal code was the first in China to include laws concerned with harmful and heterodox medical practices. For example, to treat patients for money without adhering to standard procedures was defined as fraud combined with theft and had to be tried in accordance with the legal statutes on theft. If such therapies resulted in the death of a patient, the healer was to be banished for two and a half years. In case a physician purposely failed to practice according to the standards, he was to be tried in accordance with the statutes on premeditated homicide. Even if no harm resulted, he was to be sentenced to sixty strokes with a heavy cane.

In fact, physicians practising during the Tang era had access to a wealth of pharmaceutical and medical texts, their contents ranging from purely pragmatic advice to highly sophisticated theoretical considerations. Concise descriptions of the position, morphology, and functions of the organs of the human body stood side by side in libraries with books enabling readers to calculate (the daily, seasonal and annual climatic conditions of cycles of sixty years and to understand and predict their effects on health.

Several Tang authors wrote large collections of prescriptions, continuing a literary tradition documented since the 2nd century ВС. The two most outstanding works to be named here were those by Sun Simiao (581-682?) and Wang Tao (c. 670-755). The latter was a librarian who copied more than six thousand formulas, categorised in 1,104 sections, from sixty-five older works and published them under the title Waitai miyao. Twenty-four sections, for example, were devoted to ophthalmology. They reflect the Indian origin of much Chinese knowledge on ailments of the eye and, in particular, of cataract surgery.

Sun Simiao was the most eminent physician and author not only of the Tang dynasty, but of the entire first millennium AD. He was a broadly educated intellectual and physician; his world view integrated notions of all three of the major currents competing at his time − Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism. Sun Simiao gained fame during his lifetime as a clinician (he was summoned to the imperial court at least once) and as author of the Prescriptions Worth Thousands in Gold (Qionjinfang) and its sequel. In contrast to developments in the 12th century, physicians relied on prescriptions and single substances to treat their patients’ illnesses. The theories of systematic correspondences, characteristic of the acupuncture tradition, had not been extended to cover pharmacology yet.

Sun Simiao rose to the pantheon of Chinese popular Buddhism in about the 13th century. He was revered as paramount Medicine God. He gained this extraordinary position in Chinese collective memory not only because he was an outstanding clinician and writer, but also for his ethical concerns. Sun Simiao was the first Chinese author known to compose an elaborate medical ethical code. Even though based on Buddhist and Confucian values, his deontology is comparable to the Hippocratic Oath. It initiated a debate on the task of medicine, its professional obligations, social position and moral justification that continued until the arrival of Western medicine in the 19th century.

Despite or − more likely − because of its long-lasting affluence and political stability, the Tang dynasty did not add any significantly new ideas to the interpretation of illness, health and healing. Medical thought reflects human anxieties; changes in medical thought always occur in the context of new existential fears or of fundamentally changed social circumstances. Nevertheless, medicine was a most fascinating ingredient of Tang civilisation and it left a rich legacy to subsequent centuries.

Questions 28-30

Choose the appropriate letters A-D

Questions 31-37

Do the following statements agree with the claims of the writer?

Select

Yes – if the statement agrees with the claims of the writer.

No – if the statement contradicts the claims of the writer.

Not given – if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this. Choose the appropriate letters A-D

Exam tips

Multiple choice questions

1. Use names and other words to scan to find the right place in the passage.

2. Read above and below that part of the passage and underline the words that answer the questions.


Exam tips

Yes / No / Not Given

1. Use the same approach for True / False / Not Given and Yes / No / Not Given questions.

2. Mind that True / False / Not Given questions refer to information stated in the article, whereas these questions refer to the writer’s opinions or claims.

3. Remember that ‘No’ statements say the opposite of what is stated in the passage, while the idea in ‘Not given’ statements is not mentioned at all.

pic2_IELTS|Upper-Int|Revision 3

Scan the passage and do the task below

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 28-40, which are based on Reading Passage 3 below.

The art of healing

As with so much, the medicine of the Tang dynasty left its European counterpart in the shade. It boasted its own ‘national health service’, and left behind the teachings of the incomparable Sun Simiao.

If no further evidence was available of the sophistication of China in the Tang era, then a look at Chinese medicine would be sufficient. At the Western end of the Eurasian continent the Roman empire had vanished, and there was nowhere new to claim the status of the cultural and political centre of the world. In fact, for a few centuries, this centre happened to be the capital of the Tang empire, and Chinese medicine under the Tang was far ahead of its European counterpart. The organisational context of health and healing was structured to a degree that had no precedence in Chinese history and found no parallel elsewhere.

An Imperial Medical Office had been inherited from previous dynasties: it was immediately restructured and staffed with directors and deputy directors, chief and assistant medical directors, pharmacists and curators of medicinal herb gardens and further personnel. Within the first two decades after consolidating its rule, the Tang administration set up one central and several provincial medical colleges with professors, lecturers, clinical practitioners and pharmacists to train students in one or all of the four departments of medicine, acupuncture, physical therapy and exorcism.

Physicians were given positions in governmental medical service only after passing qualifying examinations. They were remunerated in accordance with the number of cures they had effected during the past year.

In 723, Emperor Xuanzong personally composed a general formulary of prescriptions recommended to him by one of his imperial pharmacists and sent it to all the provincial medical schools. An Arabic traveller, who visited China in 851, noted with surprise that prescriptions from the emperor’s formulary were publicised on notice boards at crossroads to enhance the welfare of the population.

The government took care to protect the general populace from potentially harmful medical practice. The Tang legal code was the first in China to include laws concerned with harmful and heterodox medical practices. For example, to treat patients for money without adhering to standard procedures was defined as fraud combined with theft and had to be tried in accordance with the legal statutes on theft. If such therapies resulted in the death of a patient, the healer was to be banished for two and a half years. In case a physician purposely failed to practice according to the standards, he was to be tried in accordance with the statutes on premeditated homicide. Even if no harm resulted, he was to be sentenced to sixty strokes with a heavy cane.

In fact, physicians practising during the Tang era had access to a wealth of pharmaceutical and medical texts, their contents ranging from purely pragmatic advice to highly sophisticated theoretical considerations. Concise descriptions of the position, morphology, and functions of the organs of the human body stood side by side in libraries with books enabling readers to calculate (the daily, seasonal and annual climatic conditions of cycles of sixty years and to understand and predict their effects on health.

Several Tang authors wrote large collections of prescriptions, continuing a literary tradition documented since the 2nd century ВС. The two most outstanding works to be named here were those by Sun Simiao (581-682?) and Wang Tao (c. 670-755). The latter was a librarian who copied more than six thousand formulas, categorised in 1,104 sections, from sixty-five older works and published them under the title Waitai miyao. Twenty-four sections, for example, were devoted to ophthalmology. They reflect the Indian origin of much Chinese knowledge on ailments of the eye and, in particular, of cataract surgery.

Sun Simiao was the most eminent physician and author not only of the Tang dynasty, but of the entire first millennium AD. He was a broadly educated intellectual and physician; his world view integrated notions of all three of the major currents competing at his time − Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism. Sun Simiao gained fame during his lifetime as a clinician (he was summoned to the imperial court at least once) and as author of the Prescriptions Worth Thousands in Gold (Qionjinfang) and its sequel. In contrast to developments in the 12th century, physicians relied on prescriptions and single substances to treat their patients’ illnesses. The theories of systematic correspondences, characteristic of the acupuncture tradition, had not been extended to cover pharmacology yet.

Sun Simiao rose to the pantheon of Chinese popular Buddhism in about the 13th century. He was revered as paramount Medicine God. He gained this extraordinary position in Chinese collective memory not only because he was an outstanding clinician and writer, but also for his ethical concerns. Sun Simiao was the first Chinese author known to compose an elaborate medical ethical code. Even though based on Buddhist and Confucian values, his deontology is comparable to the Hippocratic Oath. It initiated a debate on the task of medicine, its professional obligations, social position and moral justification that continued until the arrival of Western medicine in the 19th century.

Despite or − more likely − because of its long-lasting affluence and political stability, the Tang dynasty did not add any significantly new ideas to the interpretation of illness, health and healing. Medical thought reflects human anxieties; changes in medical thought always occur in the context of new existential fears or of fundamentally changed social circumstances. Nevertheless, medicine was a most fascinating ingredient of Tang civilisation and it left a rich legacy to subsequent centuries.

Exam tips

Summary completion

1. Mind that the answers may come from more than one part of the passage.

2. Use the title and words in the summary to help you find the right parts.

3. Connect the words in the passage that provide the missing information — you need to match these to the correct option in the box.

pic6_T|Grammar act|L9

Listen to the recording and do the tasks below

Speaker Bob Julia Таrа

Speaker: Section 3

You will hear two students discussing a science project. First you have some time to look at questions 21 to 25.

Listen carefully and answer questions 21 to 25.

Bob: Hi Julia.
Julia: Hi Bob. Thought about the science project yet?
Bob: Which one? The presentations are scheduled for next month!
Julia: The experiment that you and I are working on — to demonstrate density, buoyancy and the compression of gases.
Bob: That’ll be complicated.
Julia: Well, it’s not supposed to be. It’ll be part of the ‘Making Science Simple’ series that’s being showcased next year. And we have to be ready to demonstrate by the end of next week.
Bob: Oh, well, …simple… you say.
Julia: Yes, not just the concept but the materials too. We have to use cheap, readily available, common items — expensive lab equipment is out of the question!
Bob: I remember something about using recycled or throw-away items if possible… Any thing portable that we can bring into the lab.
Julia: That’s right.
Bob: Well, any ideas for the project?
Julia: What about the classic Cartesian diver?
Bob: Is that the same as a Cartesian devil? The invention named after the famous French physicist — Rene Descartes?
Julia: Yes, a long time ago superstitious people labelled it that because they couldn’t comprehend the scientific principles it demonstrated; they thought it was black magic.
Bob: How shall we do it?
Julia: By keeping it as simple, transparent and economical as possible.
Bob: So, to start with…?
Julia: Open your pencil case and let’s have a look. Mmm, you haven’t got any…
Bob: Any what?
Julia: Paper clips.
Bob: Oh, there are lots of them in the bottom of my bag. They slip off my papers and collect in the bottom. Look, here’s half a dozen.
Julia: But they’re all big metal ones — I want little ones — small, vinyl-covered multi-coloured ones.
Bob: Oh, I’ve got one or two of them too.
Julia: Great. And…if we look around, especially on the floor, we’re bound to find a few more. See? Here.
Bob: What else do we need?
Julia: A small rubber band.
Bob: Well, I’ve got one of those in my pocket.
Julia: No, not that kind. Let’s go and ask Тага.
Bob: Why?
Julia: Those really small coloured bands for making pony tails are ideal.
Bob: Hey, Таrа?
Таrа: Yes?
Julia: Have you got any spare rubber bands like the ones you fasten your hair with?
Таrа: Oh, heaps, a whole packet full—help yourselves.
Bob: Terrific. …So far it hasn’t cost us anything. What now?
Julia: Let’s go and rummage through the recycling bins beside Joe’s Mini-market.
Bob: What for?
Julia: We want a 2-litre plastic soft drink bottle with lid.
Bob: Hey, I draw the line at sorting through other people’s rubbish and we’re also not likely to find one with a lid.
Julia: Well, go into the store and buy 2 litres of soft drink.
Bob: What flavour?
Julia: It doesn’t matter what kind of drink you get just make sure it comes in a clear P. E. T. bottle.
Bob: Where are you going?
Julia: To the cafeteria behind the Resource Centre.
Bob: What for?
Julia: I’m after some straws.
Bob: I can get them from the shop when I buy the drink.
Julia: No, I’ve seen theirs. They’re the waxed paper ones. We need clear plastic and I know they’ve got them in the cafeteria. I’ll also see if I can get a tall plastic cup from there.
Bob: Good luck. Meet you back here in 5 minutes.
Julia: Maybe longer because I want to go over to my locker and get a wire coat hanger.


Questions 21-23

Choose the correct letter, A, B or C.


Questions 24-25

Choose two letters, A-E.

A in Bob’s pencil case and the recycling bin
В in the cafeteria and the Resource Centre
С in the shop and Julia’s locker
D in Bob’s bag and his pocket
E in Tara’s packet and on the floor


Exam tips

Matching

1. Underline the key ideas in the questions and / or options.

2. Be aware that you will hear the questions in the same order as they are written on the question paper.

3. Write your answers as you listen.

pic11_T|Grammar act|L11

Listen to the recording and do the task below

Speaker Bob Julia

Speaker: Before you hear the rest of the conversation, you have some time to look at questions 26 to 30.

Now listen and answer questions 26 to 30.

Bob: Right. Have we got everything now?
Julia: I think so. I’ve got extras of most things so don’t worry if this doesn’t work first time.
Bob: Okay. Assembly. Step 1.
Julia: Take a straw and fold it in two. No, not like that — these plastic ones are quite hard to fold — try pinching it in the middle — that should make it easier to bend. You may even have to bite it but not too hard — you want a sharp crease but you don’t want to break it.
Bob: How’s this?
Julia: Good, now, second step. Wrap a rubber band several times around the ends to hold them together.
Bob: Then?
Julia: Add weight to the diver.
Bob: So, this straw is the diver?
Julia: Yes. See how I’m pulling the outside end of a paper clip out a bit? Now, hook the part I bent out into the rubber band that’s holding the straw together. No, not that way—it’ll fall off. That’s right, turn it over. Now, hook two or three more paper clips on. It’s hard to say how many we’ll need. The idea is to get the diver to be almost all the way submerged, but not quite. We can put it in this tall cup of water to test it.
Bob: Mmm…What do you think? Too buoyant? Add another paper clip?
Julia: I think so. Okay, onto the next step. Have you got the empty bottle?
Bob: Not quite.
Julia: What do you mean?
Bob: Well, it’s not quite empty.
Julia: Pour some into this cup for later. Good. Now fill the bottle with water all the way to the top and we’ll gently lower the diver in. Great — now put the cap back on.
Bob: And then?
Julia: The final step is the demonstration of our experiment — you will see that when I squeeze the bottle, the diver… sinks and when I let it go, the diver… rises.
Bob: When you squeeze, the air bubble trapped in the straw compresses and the water rushes in making it heavier so it sinks. And the reverse happens when you release the bottle. What’s the coat hanger for?
Julia: Oh, that? If our experiment didn’t work the first time and our diver stayed on the bottom, we’d have had to fish it out with a piece of wire or a hook of some kind. It’s best to be prepared.

Speaker: That is the end of section 3. You now have half a minute to check your answers.


Questions 26-30

Write no more than two words


Exam tips

Flow chart completion

1. Use the title and the words around the gaps to decide what you need to listen for.

2. Quickly read through the chart afterwards to check your answers make sense.

Read the task and prepare your 2-minute speech on the topic «The picture I remember well»

pic3_Adults|Grammar|Pre-Int|L6

Part 2 Individual Long Turn

Before you talk, you’ll have one minute to think about what you’re going to say. You can make some notes if you wish.

Speak for 2 minutes and cover all of the points to provide a relevant answer.


Describe a time when you had to go to the doctor’s/hospital

You should say:

  • what was wrong with you;
  • how you felt at the time;
  • what happened at the doctor’s/hospital and explain what treatment you were given to help you get better.

Exam tips

Speaking Part 2

1. Use your notes and the task to give your talk a clear structure.

2. Use linking and pausing to give your speech a natural-sounding rhythm.

3. Be prepared to answer one or two questions on your talk when you have finished. (You only need to give very brief answers.)


Allow your browser the access to the microphone, press the button «Record» and record the speech you have prepared

Look at the Writing task 1 and the charts below and identify the main trends and key features


Japan Netherlands US
health spending per person $2,581 $3,481 $6,719
average life expectancy 83 80 78

Writing Task 1

The chart and table give information about healthcare resources and life expectancy in different countries.

Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.

Write your answer to the Writing task above in about 20 minutes. Your answer should be at least 150 words long

Instructions

  1. Read the Exam task carefully. If necessary make use of Exam tips.
  2. Plan what you are going to write about.
  3. Write the text according to your plan.
  4. Check your writing.
  5. Please use 🔗Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.

Wordlist

1. amount
2. aspect
3. breakdown
4. incidence
5. indicate
6. highlight
7. level
8. number
9. proportion
10. quality
11. rate
12. type


Writing Task 1

Summary


Exam tips

Writing Task 1

1. If there is more than one chart, decide how they relate to each other.

2. Ensure key features are clearly expressed.

3. Include an overview, summarising the main trends or features.

4. Vary your vocabulary and use your own words as far as possible (e.g. do not lift long phrases from the task instructions).

If you open the lesson plan you will be able to assign separate pages as homework or all the homework pages at once.

  • Revise the vocabulary
  • Revise the grammar
  • My achievements
  • Healing traditions
  • Healing in China
  • Making science fun
  • Assembly
  • Active life
  • Healthcare resources
  • Homework
  • Homework
  1. 1. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|1. Being a high achiever
  2. 2. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|2. University life
  3. 3. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|3. Getting a qualification
  4. 4. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|4. Career plans
  5. 5. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 1
  6. 6. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|5. Perceiving colours
  7. 7. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|6. The art of colour
  8. 8. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|7. The best colour
  9. 9. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|8. Adding colour
  10. 10. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 2
  11. 11. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|9. In therapy
  12. 12. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|10. Placebo effect
  13. 13. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|11. Changing life expectancy
  14. 14. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|12. Leading a healthy life
  15. 15. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 3
  16. 16. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|13. Works of art
  17. 17. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|14. Aboriginal art
  18. 18. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|15. Being good at arts
  19. 19. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|16. What is a masterpiece?
  20. 20. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 4
  21. 21. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|17. Collecting fossils
  22. 22. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|18. Evolution and survival
  23. 23. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|19. The Earth's interior
  24. 24. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|20. A valuable possession
  25. 25. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 5
  26. 26. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|21. The role of technology
  27. 27. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|22. Film making and technology
  28. 28. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|23. The impact of IT on society
  29. 29. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|24. Number one website
  30. 30. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 6
  31. 31. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|25. Environmental issues
  32. 32. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|26. Wildlife wonders
  33. 33. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|27. Endangered species
  34. 34. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|28. A symbol of a nation
  35. 35. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 7
  36. 36. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|29. Exploring space
  37. 37. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|30. Observing the stars
  38. 38. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|31. Space tourism prospects
  39. 39. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|32. Extraterrestrial phenomena
  40. 40. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Revise and Check 8
  41. 41. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Exam Part 1
  42. 42. IELTS|Upper-Intermediate|Exam Part 2