Intro|Intermediate|Leaving Silicon Valley

Do you know the names of the companies that have their headquarters in Silicon Valley?

pic1_Intro|Int|Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley loves jargon. Let’s see if you can understand it

1. A ninja

a) The brand name of a robotic house-cleaning device

b) A person with amazing skills

c) An app that provides virtual assistants

2. A pufferfish

a) A nerdy IT specialist who starts doing sport

b) A startup that is very successful at the start but then loses all the profit

c) The practice of making a startup seem larger than it is

3. A unicorn

a) A product that is revolutionary in theory but is not realistic to actually produce

b) A startup valued at over one billion dollars

c) The best engineer of the company

4. Dogfooding

a) Making users very loyal to the product

b) Selling lower quality products to buyers with bad taste

c) Using or testing out its own product inside the company

See if you’re right in the next step!

pic2_Intro|Int|Silicon Valley

So, what do you think? Are Silicon Valley workers as inventive in their language as in technology?

1. A ninja — a person with amazing skills.
You can be anything from Marketing to Code Ninja. «A code ninja» is often used by Silicon Valley recruiters who don’t actually know what in specific they want in a Software Engineer, just someone who can basically do anything.

2. A pufferfish — the practice of making a startup seem larger than it is.
Among other tricks, startups have been known to decorate empty desks and to create voice-mail systems to make it seem like more people work there.

3. A unicorn — a startup that is valued at $1 billion dollars or more (would 1 billion rupees work in Sri Lanka? What do you think?)

4. Dogfooding — using or testing out its own product inside the company.
You might hear someone say: «They have to dogfood that app before they release it — there are so many bugs!»

Silicon Valley companies offer some cool perks. Let’s read about them and choose the correct headings 

pic3_Intro|Int|Silicon Valley


Of course, it is not as difficult as a Google job interview task, but could you try and guess what the highlighted words mean?

After you start using these new words, you’ll sound like a cool startup owner! So, let’s work out what this vocabulary means

Words


Here’s a little challenge for you: have a look at the pictures and fill in the gaps using new words to describe what is happening

Use the words from the box:

hurdles a pitch step in
credibility an incentive no shortage of

Not every company wants to be a neighbour of Google or Apple, but why? Let’s watch the video and find out

🔹Greater Sacramento — an area that lies in the Central Valley and Sierra Nevada regions of California as well as a small region of Western Nevada

🔹The Bay Area — a region in California where Silicon Valley is situated

🔹a hub — the most important place where a particular activity takes place

We’re not just another place. We’re not just another city. We’re a region. A mega-region of innovation. And we’re on the rise!

That’s the pitch from the Greater Sacramento Economic Council. It estimates that 24,000 people move to the city from California’s Bay Area every year.

Neal: People can come here, afford a house to live in, and they’d still have money in their pocket to enjoy themselves at the weekend. And that is becoming more and more difficult in the Bay Area.

Voiceover: Silicon Valley’s Cupertino is home to tech giants like Apple. According to the real estate company Zillow, the average cost of a home here is well over $2 million. In comparison, a house in Sacramento, about 160 km away, goes for a little over $300,000.

Voiceover: Fantag, a company that provides customers with instant video highlights operates out of a shared working space in Sacramento. The founder relocated from Silicon Valley about 16 months ago, to give the company a better chance of growing.

Brian: There’s a lot of talent up here, with the universities nearby. So, no shortage of opportunities for the company and I’m still so close to the Bay Area.

Voiceover: Running a business in Silicon Valley isn’t cheap, but many here believe it’s still worth the investment. Sharing a neighborhood with the likes of Facebook or Apple can give a startup credibility and help them stand out from the competition.

And some startups here say it’s worth every penny.



Let’s take note of what successful businessmen are saying and complete these phrases from the video

We’re not just another place. We’re not just another city. We’re a region. A mega-region of innovation. And we’re on the rise!

That’s the pitch from the Greater Sacramento Economic Council. It estimates that 24,000 people move to the city from California’s Bay Area every year.

Neal: People can come here, afford a house to live in, and they’d still have money in their pocket to enjoy themselves at the weekend. And that is becoming more and more difficult in the Bay Area.

Voiceover: Silicon Valley’s Cupertino is home to tech giants like Apple. According to the real estate company Zillow, the average cost of a home here is well over $2 million. In comparison, a house in Sacramento, about 160 km away, goes for a little over $300,000.

Voiceover: Fantag, a company that provides customers with instant video highlights operates out of a shared working space in Sacramento. The founder relocated from Silicon Valley about 16 months ago, to give the company a better chance of growing.

Brian: There’s a lot of talent up here, with the universities nearby. So, no shortage of opportunities for the company and I’m still so close to the Bay Area.

Voiceover: Running a business in Silicon Valley isn’t cheap, but many here believe it’s still worth the investment. Sharing a neighborhood with the likes of Facebook or Apple can give a startup credibility and help them stand out from the competition.

And some startups here say it’s worth every penny.



Imagine you are a CEO of a Silicon Valley startup. Would you leave this area and move to a cheaper region? Consider the following points:

🔹what your company does

🔹the number of employees

🔹the cost of moving

🔹the perks of leaving or staying

🔹a pitch

🔹no shortage of

🔹an incentive

🔹a hurdle

🔹to step in

🔹credibility

🔹to gatecrash

🔹state-of-the-art

🔹to deem

🔹outlandish

  • Silicon Valley jargon
  • Speak the lingo
  • What a perk!
  • Vocabulary to impress
  • Saying goodbye to Silicon Valley