Meetings|Pre-Int|6. Dealing with negative feedback

Read the situations at work and people’s possible reaction

pic1|Business|Pre-Int|L3

get criticised You get criticised when

🔹you risk your company’s reputation;
🔹you are rude to your clients;
🔹you do your work badly.

get praised You get praised when

🔹you manage a project effectively;
🔹you rock at a presentation;
🔹you increase sales.

ignored You are ignored when

🔹you ask too many questions;
🔹you can’t stop talking;
🔹your ideas aren’t interesting.

Read the text below

How to deal with negative feedback

Nobody likes to be criticised, it reminds us of bad childhood memories where we felt small and stupid. Still there are times when people criticise our work. Here we will tell you what are the best ways to deal with negative feedback.

«Well, I have to say I expected something better than that.» The immediate response to this kind of sentence is to start defending your work and explaining the thinking behind it. But it is better to:

✓ Step 1. Focus on getting what you need

Don’t react defensively. Start by taking a deep breath and reminding yourself that it can help you grow and improve your work.

✓ Step 2. Clarify the feedback

Before starting to fix your work, it’s essential that you understand exactly what the other person doesn’t like about it.

✓ Step 3. Ask solution-focused questions

The next step is to move the conversation forward to a positive conclusion: either getting the work accepted in its current form or agreeing on what needs changing.

Read the text again and decide if the sentences are true or false

Match the words to make a phrase

words, match the words

Complete the dialogue with the phrases

Conversation, speaking, dialogue

Complete the sentences with the best words


Watch the video and choose the best answer

Ed Lydia JJ

Ed: You do realise that your project’s going to fail? Look at the numbers, it will never work!
Lydia: He doesn’t understand anything! He’s just playing safe again. I can’t believe he’s being so critical.
Thank you for the feedback, Ed. I get that it might seem too risky but I have made my calculations. Can you please be more specific?
Ed: Well… It seems to me that the amount of money you want to spend in the first quarter of the year is quite unreasonable.
Lydia: OK, I thought about it too. Would it be better if I decrease the number by 10%? Will it work that way?
Ed: Yeah, I think so.
Lydia: OK, thanks!
What was that? You do realise that destructive feedback leads nowhere.
Ed: Yeah, I know, I had a terrible day. Sorry for not being professional.
JJ: Now you know that even really negative feedback can be turned into a positive result. You just have to use the right questions.



Watch the video again and complete the statements

Fill the gaps and complete the dialogue

conversation, dialogue, business

Watch the video and complete the sentences with the right word or phrase

JJ Ed Lydia

JJ: Hey there! Today we are going to learn how to give constructive feedback. Not that hypocritical stuff you sometimes hear, and nothing that’s too critical of someone’s work either. But instead something that will help people realise how they can improve their result.
Ed: You do realise that your project is going to fail? Look at the numbers, it will never work!
JJ: Woah, woah, wait a second there, Ed! Maybe it’s better to use some other expressions?
Lydia: He doesn’t understand anything! He is just playing safe again. I can’t believe that he is being so critical. Thank you for the feedback, Ed. I get that it might seem too risky but I have made my calculations. Can you please be more specific?
JJ: Thank you Lydia! I think the presentation is almost ready but what if we hired another agency to make the strategy for us? It would decrease the budget by 10% at least.
Ed: Well… It seems to me that the amount of money you want to spend in the first quarter of the year is quite unreasonable.
JJ: Niiiiice. Now Lydia can actually see how to improve the project without feeling upset. Let’s see another option for Ed.
Lydia: OK, I thought about it too. Would it be better if I decrease the number by 10%? Will it work that way?
JJ: Thank you Lydia! Why don’t we use an intern instead of you in the first part of the project? That way it would cost us less and it would free you up to do more important work.
Ed: Yeah, I think so.
Lydia: OK, thanks!
JJ: Well done, Ed! You’ve just killed two birds with one stone: you’ve saved money for the company and encouraged a colleague at the same time.
Lydia: What was that? You do realise that destructive feedback leads nowhere.
Ed: Yeah, I know, I had a terrible day. Sorry for not being professional.
JJ: So, as you can see, you can always express your opinion in a constructive way, so let’s check out some vocabulary.


Rearrange the words to make a sentence

pic2_Netw|Pre-Int|L8

  • Intro
  • Read the text
  • Prepare yourself
  • Make a dialogue
  • Making it positive
  • Positive after all
  • Giving constructive feedback
  • Use effective language
  • Giving constructive feedback
  • Use effective language
  1. 1. Meetings|Pre-Int|1. Introduction to meetings
  2. 2. Meetings|Pre-Int|2. How to arrange a meeting
  3. 3. Meetings|Pre-Int|3. Surviving small talk
  4. 4. Meetings|Pre-Int|4. Asking questions
  5. 5. Meetings|Pre-Int|5. Videoconferencing
  6. 6. Meetings|Pre-Int|6. Dealing with negative feedback
  7. 7. Meetings|Pre-Int|7. Duties and responsibilities
  8. 8. Meetings|Pre-Int|8. Closing a meeting