Teens|Grammar activating|Int|5. I’d done it before

Warm-up


Match the words to the pictures


Revision


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Look at the chart. Make the questions and the answers

Example:

— Has Alex ever seen a typhoon?
— Yes, he has. It was scary.


scary loud awful windy exciting dangerous
earthquake Sue Liz and Harley Alex
landslide Jimmy Jimmy Alex
typhoon Alex Sue and Ben Liz and Harley
blizzard Jimmy

Lead-in


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Watch the video and answer the questions


This is EPIC HOW TO Survive in the desert.

First off, being lost in the desert is no joke. A brutally hot climate can be deadly. Some deserts, like the Sahara, can reach temperatures of up to a 122°F at the hottest point in the day! And there’s very little water: less than half an inch of precipitation a year, and that’s from condensed fog, not rainfall! Before you even go out in the desert in the first place, you want to be dressed appropriately. Make sure you’re wearing black. While you might have heard that color black absorbs sunlight, it also absorbs your body heat, which actually makes you cooler. I didn’t know that … really, like, legitimately — just learned that in this second, right now, together with you! A loose-fitting black robe and hood is your best outfit for the hot desert sun. Pair of ski goggles will also be handy, as desert winds can whip sand in your eyes, blinding you.

The first thing you need to do is find water. A human body typically can’t last more than three days without it, and in the sweltering temperatures of the desert, you’ll be begging for hydration a lot sooner than that. And you’re going to need plenty of it. The extreme temperatures of the desert mean that you’ll need more than a gallon a day to survive. In an ideal world, you already have some water with you, but if not — here are some places to look! Find a north-facing canyon. North-facing canyons are protected from the Sun for most of the day, so they can retain rainwater for months. Also, look for bright-green plants like cotton woods, willows, aspens or palm trees. These plants love water, the perverts, and if you can find one, you can dig a hole to their roots to find it. Follow birds and/or insects: where there’s life, there’s water, so you use birds and insects as your guide. In early morning, turn over any rocks you find. Underneath, you’re going to find dew. When you find water, make sure you take a good long drink. If you sip water to try to preserve it, it’s not enough to hydrate your brain and internal organs. Whatever you do, don’t drink from a cactus! While most cacti do have liquid inside of them, it’s high in alkalis and drinking it will cause stomachaches, vomiting and, eventually, kidney failure.

No matter how badly you need water, don’t walk around in the middle of the day, when the desert sun is the hottest. You can easily die of heat stroke. Stay in the shade, out of the wind and wait. It’s like you’re Mario in Super Mario 3, in that one random desert level, and that sun is up there and it’s, like, chasing you — it’s really random. You’re also going to need to build a shelter. In the desert, shelter is more important during the day than at night. That’s because temperatures get so hot that it’s possible to die from heat stroke. Therefore, you’re going to want to stay in the shelter and sleep during the day and go out looking for food and water at night. You can make a shelter with sticks and brush. It’s helpful to find a boulder or a ledge you can use as a natural wall.


1. What clothes should you wear in the desert?

2. When is the best period of time to walk in the desert?

3. How long can a human live without water?

4. Where can you find water?

5. How can you build a shelter?


What things would you take with you on a trip to a desert? What for?


a torch
a torch

 

a rope
a rope

 

a watch
a watch

 


a box of matches
a box of matches

 

a knife
a knife

 

a mirror
a mirror

 

Reading


Read the text and choose the best summary


Survival in the Andes

On Friday, October 13, 1972, a plane that had been flying from Uruguay to Chile with 45 people on board crashed into a mountain in the Andes. How some of the passengers managed to live is one of the great survival stories.

Twenty-nine people died in the crash and in the weeks following it. On the mountain, it was freezing cold and the survivors stayed inside the crashed plane to stay warm. They had very little food and were in very great danger while they waited for a rescue team. After 11 days on the mountain, they found a small radio on the plane and they heard the news that the rescue teams had stopped searching for them. All hope was gone. They were alone and terrified.

Days became weeks. Two months after the crash, after they had waited for summer to arrive, three of the passengers, Roberto Canessa, Nando Parrado and Antonio Vizintin, left to search for help. Each man wore three pairs of socks, with a plastic bag around each foot to keep the water out, boots, four pairs of trousers and four jumpers. Many of the clothes were from the people who had died in the crash. They also took with them a large sleeping bag that they had made. Only they could save the others now.

How did these brave young men cope with the journey? None of them had climbed mountains before and it was hard. They climbed very dangerous, icy peaks, trying to reach the top of the mountain. Some days later, exhausted and cold, they reached it. They had imagined this moment for days. On the other side of the mountain, they wanted to see a valley below that would take them out of the mountains. But instead of a valley, they saw more of the same snowy peaks. Lots of them. They weren’t near the end of the mountains; they were in the middle of them. What could they do now?

But there was still hope. Parrado saw two low peaks about 65 kilometres away that didn’t have snow on them. If they could get there, they would be out of the high Andes. But to reach the peaks, they would need to walk for more days and they didn’t have enough food. But Parrado had a solution: Vizintin could return to the plane and he and Canessa would take his food. They made the plan, and Canessa and Parrado continued their journey.

As they walked, the area around them slowly began to change. The men discovered a small river; the sun was warmer. After a few days of walking, the snow had disappeared completely and flowers were everywhere. «This is the valley,» Canessa said excitedly. «This is the way out!»

Soon, they saw a few cans on the ground and some farm in a field. They knew there must be people somewhere nearby. On December 21st, after ten days, the exhausted men reached the town of Los Maitenes in Chile, and a rescue team went to save the other passengers high up in the Andes.

What had happened to them? Fortunately, they had all survived as they waited for the others to get help. The Memories of the crash in the Andes would be with them forever but their ordeal was over. They had made it out — alive.


Choose the best summary of the text:

a) The survivors of the crash waited for many weeks in the plane for someone to find and rescue them.

b) Tragically, 29 people died when the plane they were travelling in crashed into a mountain in the Andes.

c) In a terrible situation, and with no hope at all, the survivors found a way to save themselves.

d) To stay warm in the freezing cold, they wore the clothes of the people who had died in the crash.

Answer: c

Read the text again and choose the correct option

Vocabulary


Complete the sentences with the correct words


Tell a story using the words on the cards


survive
survive

 

crash
crash

 

get better
get better

 

panic
panic

 

hurt
hurt

 

cope with
cope with

 

go away
go away

 

reach
reach

 

save
save

 

Grammar


Read the rule

Past Perfect Past Perfect Continuous
🔹to describe a completed action that happened before another action in the past

He realized that he had done a very dangerous thing.

🔹with sequencing expressions (when, after, by the time, as soon as) when one event happened before another one

He had travelled all over the world by 2006.

🔹with state verbs for actions that were in progress in the past and had an effect on a later action

The climber had been lost for a long time before he was rescued.

🔹to describe a longer action that was followed by another action in the past

We had been driving all night before we realized that we were lost.

🔹for actions that were in progress in the past and had an effect on a later action

They were exhausted because they had been climbing for many days.


Complete the sentences with the correct form of the verb

Telling stories


Using narrative tenses

To write stories based in the past, we use narrative tenses. The most common narrative tenses are Past Simple, Past Continuous, Past Perfect Simple and Past Perfect Continuous.

  • Use Past Simple to talk about a completed action / state in the past, a series of actions that happened one after the other in the past or to take the action of the story further.
  • Use Past Continuous to set the scene of the story and to talk about an action that was in progress in the past when another action interrupted it.
  • Use Past Perfect Simple to talk about an action that happened before the time of the narrative or another past action.
  • Use Past Perfect Continuous to talk about an action that was in progress for some time in the past which was interrupted by another past action, or which had an effect on a later event in the past.


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Complete the sentences with the correct form of the verb

Listening


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Listen to the text and fill it in with the missing information


Today I’m standing in the Atacama Desert, in Chile, South America. That’s A-T-A-C-A-M-A. It’s not the sort of place most people want to come to, but one of the most challenging races in the world start right here — it’s called the Four Deserts Race. Competitors in this incredible race have to run through 4 deserts in 4 different continents! That’s quite a challenge, isn’t it? Let’s take a look at some of the difficulties that runners could have.

Now each part of the race is 250 kilometres long and takes 7 days. Runners have tents and medical care, but they have to carry all their own clothes and food. Here in the Atacama Desert, the landscape is quite similar to the planet Mars and the temperature is around 32 degrees Celsius. It’s the driest place on Earth. So obviously, it’s not an easy place to run.

Now in the next part of the race, which is in June, competitors go to the Gobi desert in China. Remember I said that runners have to carry their own clothes? This becomes difficult in this desert, because it can be boiling hot during the day but below freezing at night. And there can be very strong winds and sometimes snow in the mountains. You need lots of different kinds of clothes in those kinds of temperatures!

What happens after Atacama and Gobi? The next part of the race is in the famous Sahara Desert in Egypt. This is the hottest and biggest desert on Earth, and one of the main problems for runners is the sand. It’s everywhere! Strong winds can blow the sand into sandstorms and it can be difficult to breathe. Fortunately, the competitors in the race only have to run across a very small part of it, but I don’t think it will feel small to them!

And now to the final desert that the runners have to cope with. It might be a bit of a surprise — it’s Antarctica! That’s A-N-T-A-R-C-T-I-C-A. Many deserts are hot and sandy, but this one is covered in snow and ice. It’s the coldest and windiest place on the planet. Imagine running in that place for a week! Competitors have to complete two of the other desert races before they can try this final challenge. The conditions might be very difficult, but they have the chance to see some amazing wildlife in Antarctica. They’ll see penguins, seals and whales, and the penguins might even join them on their race! The difference between this desert race and the others is that athletes sleep on a ship that travels with them, and they have food provided. They need plenty of healthy food as during the day the competitors are running in very extreme conditions. Well, these deserts are all very hard environments, but I’m sure competitors in the Four Deserts Race have an amazing experience.


Your stories



Read the instructions

Look at the pictures and imagine the story behind the photo. Mind the sequence of tenses.

Start with the sentence:

Example: It was the hardest and the most exciting day of my life.


Useful language

🔹scary
🔹hair-raising
🔹a rocky cliff
🔹an amazing sunset
🔹an impressive view
🔹to risk one’s life
🔹to go climbing
🔹to get unforgettable experience
🔹to get a snap
🔹to go to an expedition
🔹to explore the wilderness

What you can do


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The things you have learnt today:

🔹talk about survival in extreme situations;
🔹use Past Perfect Simple, Past Perfect Continuous and Past Simple while speaking about extreme situations;
🔹listen to and understand texts better;
🔹read and understand texts better.


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1. cave
2. cliff
3. rock
4. waterfall

Useful vocabulary

🔹as quick as lightning
🔹to do one’s best
🔹to get lost
🔹to go missing
🔹to keep calm
🔹to make a journey
🔹scared to death
🔹without thinking

Homework


Match the words with their definitions

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Complete the text with the words from the exercise 1

Choose the correct form of the verb to complete the sentences



Complete the second sentence so that it has the same meaning as the first one

Think of any story that happened to you or your friends


Cover the points:

  1. The place where the story is set.
  2. The main character and a plan of action.
  3. How the plan is carried out and what happens next.
  4. The scene and physical and mental state of the character.

Write a story according to the plan above. Use some of the words below

Instructions

  1. Read the topic and the questions carefully.
  2. Plan what you are going to write about.
  3. Write the text according to your plan.
  4. Check your writing before sending it for evaluation.
  5. Learn the rules and see the sample here.
  6. Please use Grammarly to avoid spelling and some grammar mistakes.

Extreme situations


Natural sites

  1. cave
  2. cliff
  3. rock
  4. waterfall

Useful language

🔹as quick as lightning
🔹to do one’s best
🔹to get lost
🔹to go missing
🔹to keep calm
🔹to make a journey
🔹scared to death
🔹without thinking